Seven looks into Paul Smith's Spring men's show, a giant multicolored mushroom appeared on a shirt. Further on, it multiplied into an allover motif, sprouting from the yoke of a chambray shirt, or woven into a jacquard. You might assume this was Smith's way of telling us these were fun guys (fungi, get it?); he being a master at Brit wit and all.

But Smith seemed more focused on the collision of sportswear and suiting—and how they can coexist in a variety of hybrid, high-impact separates. Backstage, he said the juxtaposition of skateboarding and snowboarding performance materials with superfine summer wool hit an incongruous sweet spot that has become something of a Smith signature. He pointed out that there wasn't any formal suiting (a puckered jacket-and-pant combo in a juicy melon hue came closest). Instead, he showed a clever cropped blouson in a giant windowpane fabric with a drawstring nylon layer poking out below. A knee-length coat combined patches of bouncy mesh and supple leather. Hot-pink pants were capped off with fuchsia zippered sweatband cuffs.

Yet this duality was not nearly as obvious as the trippy asymmetry. A triangular patch of color started on one pant leg and widened seamlessly across the other. Thick, irregular bands of contrasting color (or non-color in some cases) wrapped around sport jackets that were shown over shirts with dramatically elongated collars. Fine-gauge knits were covered in random regions of pink. Even the zippered plackets appeared more trapezoidal than rectangular. Smith conceded that he had no idea where this idea came from—not that every design inspiration requires motivation (the black sandals and black socks remain a question mark). Aha, maybe the mushrooms made him do it.