Asked why he opted for such a layered look this season, Yohji Yamamoto replied that he is fascinated with nomads—how they will often wear all the clothing they own and, without intent, manage to make some kind of statement on style.

The designer's idealized nomads wore their clothes baggy; both pants and jackets appeared doubled up, with lower layers hanging down in a way we have seen from him in the past. This time, however, the tailoring ended up a tad limp. The layers worked better when sliced with longitudinal venting down legs and arms, affording generous flow. And when the smocks and shorts were as spare as the electric guitar soundtrack, things felt more on point.

Accenting all the black and slate gray were sunset hues of gradient yellow, purple, and blue, suggesting the passage of time (indeed, one shirt was marked like a clock face). This might also explain the whitened braids and foreheads; it was an illumination effect. Or else maybe it represented another layer—this time, of dust.

But then what to think of the high-sheen fabrics meant to look rain slickened and the ominous umbrellas capped with scarecrow beaks and claws? Well, when you're a nomad, you're more exposed to the elements. If Yamamoto had a dark cloud over his head this season, it will surely pass.