The Carolina Herrera woman has always been a classy, cosmopolitan character. Backstage after her show, the designer said that her Spring femme was active and international, stopping in France one day and South America the next. This spirit shone through in some of the collection's more youthful, sporty wares, like an embellished black dress with meshlike tulle detailing and a boxy, ivory suede frock with strict-but-subtle sheer insets.

Spring '14, however, was decidedly evening-centric in comparison to recent Herrera outings. While there were about a dozen fluid gowns sent down the catwalk this morning, the designer offered only a handful of trousers and focused more on ladylike cocktail frocks and swooshing floor-length dresses than daytime separates. Perhaps this had something to do with her inspiration. While dreaming up her Spring prints and silhouettes, Herrera referenced kinetic art, specifically the work of Venezuelan artists Carlos Cruz-Diez and Jesús Rafael Soto. She translated the movement's graphic lines into geo-prints, which appeared in chocolate, citrus, and plum on skirts and gowns as well as on their organza overlays. As they swished down the catwalk, Herrera's layered lines produced mesmerizing optical illusions. "When you layer the fabrics like this, it becomes an entire visual experience," she said. No doubt, it would be tricky to achieve the same effect with classic suiting or separates.

That's not to say Herrera's loyal customers won't have before-dark options for Spring. A series of viscose-blend day dresses were soft, energetic, and easy. And a glamorous black and white bikini covered with wafting organza (and topped with a very Audrey-esque sun hat) seemed to cater to Herrera's newer devotees, such as Christina Ricci, Michelle Dockery, and Christina Hendricks, who sat in the front row. Only, it would've been nice to see more attention paid to the chic sportswear that's been so integral to the Herrera brand.