Word on the street in London today was that Eudon Choi had a fairly byzantine reference set this season—something about a Korean princess married lovelessly to a Japanese king. Or vice versa? Anyway, sometimes backstory is irrelevant. Whatever backstory it was that got Choi to produce this collection, it worked. This was by far his most accomplished outing yet. There was a sense of specificity to these looks, from the show-opening asymmetric dress made from puzzled-together pieces of men's shirting fabrics, to the insouciant askewness of Choi's side-slung knit dresses and tops, to the controlled yet expansive volume of a strapless white cotton frock. Choi refined his pieces, but he didn't over-fuss them. The strongest items here tended to be the ones that erred toward a menswear influence: the shirting pieces and loungewear-style pajama pants and robes. (As an aside, apropos of the latter: Is it possible that fashion people have fallen in love with pajama dressing because we are all totally and utterly exhausted? Just saying.) Here and elsewhere, simplicity reigned. And the collection's standout look was the simplest, or the seemingly simplest, of all: a pair of pale pink A-line shorts paired with a matching T-shirt with an alluring backward drape. That's all it takes sometimes. A good look works for a Korean princess, or a Japanese one. Or whomever.