Josie Natori outlined her mission this season as "celebrating the woman in a very modern way." To get there, Natori backtracked to 1930's Hollywood, an era she admires for its empowered screen sirens and strong, sensual silhouettes. "Every woman is an icon," the designer said, explaining that she wanted to create "power dressing" pieces that were still feminine. The result was an appealingly soft yet structured group of daytime separates in Italian jacquard that had substance, thanks to their weave, but still gave the impression of floating off the body. Lightness is key for Natori, who is never far from the kimono. Evolved elements of its shape were apparent throughout, from the loose bows that tied cotton shirting at the waist to the capacious nature of most of the collection's sleeves. The silhouette stayed simple and organic through evening, but a blurred, rainbow-bright check print gave a somewhat unpleasant jolt; a series of sheer tops in sherbet hues paired with crisp pastel pants were a better use of brights. Old Hollywood elegance was fully restored by the simplest looks—the unstructured, uncluttered gowns that closed the show. Sometimes the best way to celebrate a woman is to let her speak for herself.