"Future hippie cyberpunk" was Richard Nicoll's distillation of the spirit of his new men's collection. That didn't really gel with what we saw on the catwalk, which was essentially the Nicoll we've become familiar with since he started showing menswear three years ago: easy, sporty, casually proportioned, intriguingly colored, all with a techno gloss. You could pluck more descriptives from his show notes—basic, urban, utilitarian. So far, so generic.

But that was only half the story. The designer insisted his emphasis this time around was on "personality and diversity" within that generic context. Cut a basic blouson, for instance, from a metal-threaded fabric that could be crinkled any way you wanted. Or better yet, use the artisanal Japanese tie-dyeing technique of shibori on a bomber jacket, then plasticize the result. That hybrid of mechanical and handmade kind of hit the "future hippie cyberpunk" button. It was also the best example of the urban bohemian quality that Nicoll talked about.

There were others: Tyvek tees, ombré-dyed shirts, silk paisley shorts paired with a chunky knit, tomato red and a tricky acid yellow as accent colors. The presence of a few streamlined looks from Nicoll's Resort collection for women had the usual knock-on effect of making the boys appear even more boyish by contrast. In fact, they looked pretty. Was that something he was acknowledging when he delivered his signature jumpsuit in girlish gingham? Gender's a mere bagatelle for the urban bohemian.