So Tom Ford wasn't kidding when he told Style.com he was off suits. Here he stood in front of his Spring presentation in a safari jacket and T-shirt, looking all the better for his newly relaxed guise. Further evidence: There was exactly one suit in the show. It featured a different construction from the sleek sartoria that has won Ford his loyal following of hedge fund he-men.

For Spring, Ford was thinking about what such men would want for their days off. There was a typically Fordian aperçu—"Everyone likes to look sexy for the weekend"—to accompany an expanded denim line, all made in the USA (the only part of his collection that isn't produced in Italy). The designer was particularly taken with the way his jeans cupped the butt. He showed them for evening with an animal-print silk tux jacket.

That easy sportswear luxe is a category Ford is keen to grow, hence Spring's re-emphasis. He's addressing his own needs, too. Family life places different demands on a guy's wardrobe. And, maybe because some of Ford's family life is in Santa Fe, there was a Western flavor to his new collection: fringed suede jackets; denim cowboy shirts; desert boots in leather, based on a pair his husband, Richard, has been wearing since the sixties. Ford remarked on the passing resemblance one of his models had to Warhol superstar Joe Dallesandro, who made the West a little bit wilder in Lonesome Cowboys. There was little chance Ford's own cowboys would let themselves get so down and dirty in his fringed suede. Developed specially for him, plush as the most luxurious velvet, dyed in shades so edible they made you hungry, it was hardly skin as we know it. "Cashmere suede," he called it. It was just the kind of secret weapon a smart cookie needs to fire up his sportswear business.