Sergio Corneliani says he looked to the future for Spring 2015, something Italian designers have been forcing themselves to do more and more as of late. For this outing, that meant a little streetwear influence—stated by baggy pants, generous jackets, hooded parkas, and wide-neck leather T-shirts. It wasn't the sportswear-inspired streetwear we've seen iterated on the runways in New York and London for the past few seasons (the pleated trousers and three-button jackets weren't quite downtown ready), but, hey, this is Milan, where hand-stitched lapels are still the rule, not the exception.

Corneliani's experiments with fit weren't quite as persuasive as some of the more imaginative casual pieces. The funnel-neck shirt was simple, elegant, and cool. Animal-hide outerwear looked surprisingly summery—both the gray leather bomber and beige suede pullover would pair well with the linen trousers favored by the men of Milan. As for color, powder blue and sage green popped in the middle of a mostly white show that ended with a stark black period.

The slightly oversize suiting seemed less like a look toward the well-dressed future and more like a concession to the next generation who hasn't yet learned all the rules. Corneliani's laid-back take on tailoring appears comfortable—the models moved with ease—but does the effort to avoid stodginess come at a cost? You'd like to think there can be a streetwear solution to tailoring that does more than just size up.