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Partying with Mayor Bloomberg and Maripol at a pair of publishing-world bashes

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Jared Kushner, Katie Couric, and Michael Bloomberg   
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The written word isn't dead. Proof of that could be found in last night's uptown-downtown publishing-world parties. The festivities began in the Four Seasons' Pool Room, where The New York Observer celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary with a cocktail party that drew such a large swath of the city's socialites, financiers, and politicians that even Mayor Bloomberg was impressed. "The Observer throws a great party," he said. "It shines the spotlight on the characters that make New York City what it really is, the center of the universe."

Dennis Basso—who has an anniversary of his own this year, marking thirty years in the fur business—was feeling sentimental: "You know, I met Ivanka Trump when she was 3 years old—and look how far she's come now!" For once, Ivanka, and not her dad Donald, was the focus of the evening, greeting guests, arm in arm with her husband, Observer publisher Jared Kushner.

Things were a bit more fast and loose later on at the Document release party. It seemed that nearly every downtown art kid there is came out to celebrate the niche title's second issue. In fact, the line outside the New Museum grew so boisterous at one point that it became impossible to let some of the magazine's contributors up to the rooftop party. "Maripol can't get in!" shrieked creative director James Valeri.

As the vodka ran out at the bar and the party started to calm down a bit, editorial director Nick Vogelson told Style.com, "Our job is curating the contributors and letting them do what they want." Victoria Bartlett styled a spread for this issue, and of the five racks of clothes that were pulled, she only ended up with about two fashion credits over sixteen pages. A nearly naked fashion shoot—talk about creative freedom. "It's about seeing another side of people in a really creative way that we don't get to see them usually," said Vogelson. "That kind of creative license is how we get such great talent to contribute."

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