Style.com

July 29 2014

styledotcom The looks that should have walked the #ComicCon red carpet: stylem.ag/1AuceTS pic.twitter.com/e9zyEVRRzQ

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Shop the Look: Fringe Factor

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Fringe Fashion

Ever since Karl Lagerfeld sent models down a Dallas runway in miles of fringe, cowboy boots, and blanket-striped ponchos for Chanel’s Métiers d’Arts show, there’s been a collective shift toward Western style. But you don’t have to live in Texas or own a Palomino to pull it off. Fashion houses like Valentino and Saint Laurent are giving fringe a chic, citified appeal. In earthy hues like ecru, black, and burnt sienna, fringe is perfect for the workweek ahead and your weekend trip upstate—it’s as easy as swapping your pumps for desert boots. Shop our favorite fringe pieces by J.Crew, Tamara Mellon, and more, below.

1. Tamara Mellon fringed suede pencil skirt, $895, available at net-a-porter.com

2. Samuji ecru white rooibos crop top, $400, available at avenue32.com

3. J.Crew chain tassel earrings, $58, available at jcrew.com

4. Saint Laurent fringe small bucket bag, $2,150, available at barneys.com

5. Valentino C-Rockee fringed leather sandals, $1,095, available at mytheresa.com

Photos: Courtesy Photos

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The Looks That Should Have Walked the Comic-Con Red Carpet

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Stella McCartneyOne doesn’t typically associate the fashion industry with comic book culture, and yet every year our favorite celebs hit Comic-Con wearing the best of the new collections. Considering the laid-back, youthful setting, we anticipated that the likes of Cate Blanchett, Kristen Stewart, Salma Hayek, and more red-carpet regulars would step out in bright, fun-to-wear ensembles that matched the atmosphere. In reality, we saw lots of dark colors, ladylike shift dresses, and sensible heels. Where’s the fun in that? The Fall ’14 runways and Resort ’15 collections were literally bursting at the seams with pieces that were practically made for Comic-Con, like Rodarte’s C-3PO gown, Neil Barrett’s lightning-bolt bomber jacket, and Stella McCartney’s Resort ’15 superhero-inspired wares complete with clutches that double as masks. To us, it was a no-brainer…or so we thought. Here, a slideshow of all the graphic prints, cartoon motifs, and bold colors we would have loved to have seen at the convention.

Photo: Stella McCartney 

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At Colorado’s Pot-Themed Wedding, Everybody Raised a Grass

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weed bouquetSomething old, something new, something borrowed, something…green? That was the case for newly wedded (newly weeded?) Colorado couple Lauren Meisels and Bradley Melshenker, who supplemented their nuptials with what they “love the best”: cannabis. According to The New York Times, not only was the bridal bouquet made of marijuana leaves, but the groomsmen accented their tuxes with boutonnieres filled with the couple’s favorite plant. While this budding trend might be a slow burn, some dank additions to Spring ’15′s wedding gowns would definitely make bridal week a little more chill.

Photo: Morgan Rachel Levy for The New York Times 

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Editor Obsessions: Moschino’s Irreverent Tee

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Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

Moschino TeeWhen Jeremy Scott made his Moschino debut in February, he wore this shirt. For that reason alone, I am shocked that the tee is still available. I love how Scott throws consumer culture in everyone’s face—and this shirt, as well as his Fall collection, does just that. Sure, $265 is a pretty penny for a glorified cut of cotton, but at least you get the label name in an obnoxiously large font. If only it were available in black…

Moschino slogan T-shirt, $265, Buy it now

Photo: Courtesy Photo

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Dressing for Fame: Versace, J.Lo, RiRi Gone Rogue, and More Career Tidbits from Stylists Mariel Haenn and Rob Zangardi

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If celebrity status is conferred in red-carpet appearances, then no actress today can compete without the help of just the right stylist. As Kerry Washington once told Glamour after she noticeably upped the sartorial ante, “There were a couple of actresses whom I felt were having the upper hand careerwise—because they knew how to work that red carpet.” A carefully crafted collaboration between stylist and client, the perfect look can create an indelible impact on agents, casting directors, and those of us watching from the sidelines. Straight from the epicenter of all things celebrity, we’ve asked some of the industry’s top stylists to share their experiences and impressions from their perch above Tinseltown. With our Dressing for Fame series, we bring you an exclusive, insider look at everything it takes to create those iconic moments captured by a million photo flashes.

Rob Zangardi and Mariel Haenn

Rob Zangardi and Mariel Haenn

It takes quite the fashion force to dress J.Lo for the stage, Rachel McAdams for the Cannes red carpet, and Pharrell for his many (sartorially daring) public outings, but the powerhouse styling duo of Mariel Haenn and Rob Zangardi have proved they’re nothing if not up to the task. Whether they’re commissioning original pieces to bring an idea to life, going back to their roots on music video sets, or forging relationships with up-and-coming talent, their scene-stealing tastes draw a uniquely diverse client mix that includes the abovementioned stars and beyond. Here, the duo talks exclusively to Style.com about going rogue with RiRi (they worked with the songstress for four years), being equal-opportunity stylists, and why women are more complex to style than men.

How did you both begin styling?
Rob Zangardi: I grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and graduated with a fashion merchandising degree from Ohio University. After college, my twin brother was working in NYC as a casting director, casting the audience for the VH1 Vogue Fashion Awards. He knew I would love it, so I stood in the pit to watch the show and ended up meeting a stylist who worked at MTV. I had no idea what a stylist was until then, but it sounded like my dream job. Because of her, I ended up getting hired at MTV to help with their New Year’s Eve show, which turned into a full-time job—right place, right time. And the rest is history.

Mariel Haenn: I was in school at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale for fashion design and I met someone who introduced me to the music video world. I started as a seamstress on videos, and then was assistant-styling while still in college. Once I graduated, I was fortunate enough to keep getting called to assist, but in the back of my mind, I was focusing on working at a design studio. I considered styling my means of making a living until I found the job I really wanted. Cut to 13 years later, turns out this is the job I wanted.

RihannaWhat’s the most memorable moment you’ve created thus far?

RZ: Rachel McAdams in the red Marchesa at the Cannes Film Festival was pretty memorable. She just looked like a movie star—you couldn’t take your eyes off of her. That train added the perfect amount of glamour and drama but didn’t overpower the woman wearing it. It was definitely a moment.

MH: Rihanna in the Dolce & Gabbana tux at the [2009] Met Gala. That was a special moment because we went completely rogue. It was a Marc Jacobs year and we got a call 30 minutes prior that so-and-so was wearing the same boots we’d planned on putting Ri in. So last minute, we went for plan B, and plan B ended up being this complete outlaw moment for both Rihanna and in Met history. It was something special.

RZ: Working with Versace to re-create Jennifer Lopez’s iconic Grammys dress for her most recent performances was also huge. It was pretty unbelievable to see her in the print that started it all.

How do you find working in New York different from working in L.A.?
MH: Styling-wise, New York tends to be much more avant-garde and fashion-forward. L.A. is a bit more risk averse and tends to focus on glamour more so than experimentation. There’s also a different level of polish. In L.A., you never want to look like you’re trying too hard—it’s almost as if people put even more effort into looking “effortless” than anything else—while in New York, there’s a broader range in dressing up and down.

RZ: It might sound cliché, but New York’s pace and tone also feels a lot quicker and has this undeniable sense of purpose. The way people walk in New York is representative of how they are. There’s a bigger hustle. It feels more natural for us, honestly, since we are always on the move and juggling multiple projects. The collaborations in L.A. tend to also be more commercial. New York is a greater creative playground. We get to be more forward-thinking and innovative.

What’s your favorite event to dress clients for and why?
RZ: Working on tours and music videos is definitely something we both really enjoy because there is more storytelling involved. There’s an entire arc that goes beyond a broad theme, so to speak. The looks have to work together with different elements to communicate so much. It’s not simply a supplement or continuation of the story, it’s a significant part of it.

MH: Collaborating with designers on custom pieces is a big thrill for us, too. Red carpet is fun, but there’s something to be said for bringing an idea to life rather than plucking from what already exists. A great example is having had the honor of working with Versace for Jen [Lopez]‘s stage looks in NYC. The experience itself was pretty surreal and the end result was nothing short of exceptional.

How do you manage to juggle multiple clients with multiple obligations and aesthetics all at once?
RZ: This is where it’s great to have two people rather than one. We like to joke that we are carbon copies of each other, so it’s like being in two places at once.

MH: The reason we started working together to begin with is because Rob was the only one I trusted to hand my clients over to if I wasn’t available for a job. The partnership was very organic. In terms of balancing the different aesthetics, you sort of train your mind to understand each client and their personality. There’s a lot of relationship-building there. After that, it’s almost impossible to mix aesthetics because you associate the person with the look so instantly.

How do you think working as a pair strengthens your styling? What has this relationship been like?
RZ: Our taste is practically the same, yet we complement each other well in terms of workflow and personality. The relationship is like an old married couple meets brother and sister, if that makes sense.

MH: For lack of a better phrase, two heads are truly better than one. It’s great to have someone else to bounce ideas off of, especially when in a more risk-taking scenario. It’s also great to have someone challenge you or ask the right questions when you’re dead set that something might look great but it could actually be better.

How do you balance dressing clients in looks by emerging designers as well as clothes by respected, longstanding favorites?
RZ: We try to be “equal opportunity” stylists and simply pull what we think will work best for the client in that particular scenario, despite notoriety. The designers we have relationships with always end up in that mix because we sincerely admire their work. That relationship is built from using their pieces over and over as opposed to an obligation.

MH: Plus, we know which clients love which designers and will want to try their pieces no matter what, like Jen with Zuhair Murad, for example.

Do you approach styling men and women differently?
MH: Men usually go one of two ways: very classic or completely modern. You have someone like Will Smith, who is just dapper Old Hollywood movie star head to toe, and then on the flip side, somebody like Pharrell, who loves to play with fashion and sees it as an extension of his art. Styling women has a much greater spectrum, and there are many more shades of gray. It’s equally important to understand the client’s personality and experiences, regardless of gender, and women, by nature, tend to have more complexity. This reflects in how many different ways you can go with a look.

What do you think of the “stylist as celebrity” trend?
RZ: In a more open, share-friendly, social-media-driven world, anyone can be a “celebrity” for their craft or, in some cases, their lifestyle. The definition of celebrity has shifted in that regard. From a creative standpoint, that’s a great thing, because regardless of what you do, you can be found and your work can be followed, admired, and act as inspiration for somebody else. This creates an elevated benchmark for everybody and their work, and in turn, much more interesting, provocative, and creative end products.

Photos: Courtesy Photo; Wireimage 

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