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August 22 2014

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If He Builds It, They Will Come

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Salvor Projects designer Ross Menuez is a hands-on type of guy. That’s putting it mildly: As Menuez prepares for his first-ever fashion week presentation, he’s handling just about every part of it himself. He’s designed the setup of his multimedia installation, created hammocks of industrial plastic in which to suspend Salvor Projects-clothed models, shot and edited the film he’ll be projecting, and has mixed together his own soundtrack, as well as composing some of the music therein. “Do I need to make the food for backstage, too?” Menuez asks, half seriously, as he shows off some of the prints he’ll be using in his upcoming collection. (That’s one, above.)

Given that Salvor Projects is one of the six labels to win this year’s Ecco Domani award, Menuez ought to be able to outsource the catering, at least. But then again, why not take a crack at cookery, too? The designer long ago proved himself a dab hand at, well, just about everything. Trained as an industrial designer, Menuez designed furniture, lighting, and housewares for several years prior to arriving on the fashion scene; in 1996, he took home the Best New Designer prize at the ICFF. While working for Habitat, he developed an interest in textiles, and, he says, “began shifting into thinking in 2-D.” The interest in textiles begat an interest in printing, which begat Salvor Projects in 2003. The line has since comprised silkscreened tees and scarves, printed leather handbags, outerwear, and one pair of steel-toe work boots. Fall ’10 is Menuez’s fourth season focusing primarily on womenswear, and his February 10 presentation has given him an excuse to revert to 3-D thinking: He says he wants the experience of entering the West Chelsea space he’s booked to be immersive. “It’ll be dark, and kind of like the girls are sleeping, and the film is like their shared dream. A collective unconscious. And when people enter, it’ll be like they’re entering the same dream.”

Photo: Courtesy of Salvor Projects

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