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April 19 2014

styledotcom A real-life lodging that puts 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' to shame: stylem.ag/1hUXjLj

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Curtains Up At New York’s
Newest Gallery Of Note

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New York’s newest gallery, Algus Greenspon, is a bona fide labor of love—emphasis on labor. It’s been two years in the works, and only a few months ago, co-founder and director Amy Greenspon (who will run the gallery with Mitchell Algus) was referring to the Morton Street space as “the puddle,” thanks to the poky pace of construction. Luckily, she had supportive friends to ease her along. “I didn’t have much to do with it,” pal Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler demurred. “But I’d ride my bike over after work and we’d sit in the space and drink a bottle of wine.”

He was only one of the many friendly faces on hand for the grand opening last night. Hernandez and Jack McCollough, Kai Kühne, artists Nate Lowman and Hanna Liden, and gallerists Kelly Taxter and Pascal Spengemann were all there to see the opening show, a retrospective of the work of Gene Beery (pictured). Artist/performer/gallerina Emily Sundblad even performed a few songs for the occasion. (“Pure bliss,” was Kühne’s verdict.) All in all, a bang-up opening—and a testament to the power of word of mouth. “I’m a technological disaster,” Greenspon said. “So apparently not a soul received the e-mail invite I sent. I’m so happy the word got out, or it would have been Emily singing her heart out for Mitchell, me, and Michael, the mouse that comes out at night.” And luckily for revelers, Michael didn’t end up making an appearance.
Algus Greenspon, 71 Morton Street, NYC, (212) 255-7874, www.algusgreenspon.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Algus Greenspon

Sauvage Love

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Adrien Sauvage is an unusual multi-talent—a former basketball player turned London’s coolest new suitmaker. Never mind that the photo essay/ad campaign he shot for the line, starring Mark Ronson (above), Coco Sumner (top), Bill Nighy, Terry Gilliam, and an 82-year-old former Harlem Globetrotter is called “This Is Not A Suit.” And there’s another talent still, for photography—”This Is Not A Suit” attracted enough attention from the British media that he’s now fending off offers as a lensman. “For now, I will stick to the design thing,” Sauvage said last night at the line’s debut at Matches. “It’s going so well.”

Sumner was on hand for the event, as were Lily Allen and rocker-sartorialists like Louis Simonon (son of Clash guitarist Paul Simonon, and occasional Prada model) and These New Puritans’ George Barnett, the rock drummer who’s a favorite of Hedi Slimane (and has done turns on the Dior Homme runway). And so, of course, were plenty of sharp A.Sauvage suits as well. There are dashes of public schoolboy style—Prince of Wales check and fine cashmere, but also purple and orange trousers and sizing for the full-grown gent (a nod, perhaps, to Sauvage’s own basketball-player’s proportions). Coco, for her part, was holding out for a custom piece. She didn’t get to keep the suit she modeled, but, she said, “I think he’s making a waistcoat for me. At least I hope.”

Photos: Adrien Sauvage

Ron Galella Reminisces, The Lady Dior
Gets Larger Than Life, And More…

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Did Jackie O.—arguably the paparazzo get of the sixties—secretly love being photographed by Ron Galella (pictured, left stalking his prey)? The lensman seems to think so—though based on his description of their one conversation (“You’ve been hunting me for three months now”), we’re less sure. [The Moment]

One of fashion’s ultimate boundary crossers is, no surprise, preparing yet another boundary crossing. Hussein Chalayan is mounting an installation and film on the overlap of art and fashion at London’s Lisson gallery. [WWD]

Dior doesn’t do anything so middling as erect a mere scaffolding when it renovates a store. It just builds a giant, camouflaging Lady Dior bag. [Racked]

Your Friday not-so-surprise: Olivia Palermo would like to be a designer. [Styleite]

Fashionista does its best to translate the blog-speak of one Miss Lourdes Leon, Madonna’s daughter and muse of her Material Girl line. Since it’s often difficult to figure out what the hell the girl is talking about, we’re var var (Loures-ism: “very”) grateful, so mercizz (“thanks”). [Fashionista]

Photo: WireImage / Getty Images

Whoo Is Oh Land?

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A former ballerina with a funny name may soon be the fashion set’s new favorite music act. Either way, expect to hear more about Danish electro-pop artist Oh Land (pictured) in coming months. Sony’s Epic Records is putting out her EP in September and her debut album in early 2011, and Missoni has gotten on board early, selecting Oh Land (née Nanna Øland Fabricius) as a face for M Missoni and as the evening’s entertainment for its summer party last night at Le Bain. Maryna Linchuk, Ann Dexter-Jones, and Byrdie Bell were all on hand to give a listen.

Oh Land has only been in New York since January, and writes and performs (solo, using drum machine and synthesizer) from a very specific place: “This land where big city and skyscrapers and great nature and mountains and valleys come together—my little musical church,” she explained post-performance. It doesn’t hurt, of course, that the keeper of that church is a total stunner.

M Missoni had dressed her in a bat-winged tunic that gave her freedom to sway and ripple during her set. “I love what I’m wearing right now and I feel really comfortable in it,” Oh Land said, flapping her arms. “Like a big owl.”

Photo: Neil Rasmus/Patrick McMullan

Smythson for Blokes

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Smythson has been crafting extremely fine (and, let’s be honest, extremely expensive) stationery and leather goods for over a century now, since Frank Smythson first opened his doors on London’s New Bond Street. But in recent years, the offerings, while largely unisex, skewed toward the women’s market. But this holiday season, the men are getting theirs. A new collection of men’s business accessories aims to bring the gents deeper into the Smythson fold, with several styles of briefcases, laptop bags, overnight cases, wallets, and small leather goods. (A new, more masculine logo—a circular silver button dotted in the center with the line’s hallmark Nile blue—is also being introduced.) Smythson’s longtime creative director, Samantha Cameron, recently moved into a design consultant position, the better to accommodate her new role—as wife of Britain’s new prime minister, David Cameron. It’s not hard to imagine one of the new cases finding its way to the PM’s office at 10 Downing Street.
Men’s accessories range from $1,200 to $2,200 and arrive this October at Smythson boutiques, www.smythson.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Smythson