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Meet Elliphant, the Provocative Swedish Pop Singer You Need to Know

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elliphant

Elliphant, whose EP “Look Like You Love It” is out this week via Mad Decent records, is not your ordinary pop star. Take, for instance, her perpetually wild visuals, like her latest video for the dizzying track “Revolusion.” It features her decapitated head Saran-wrapped as if it were chilling at the meat market, replete with a reduced price of $2.35. Then there are her jams, produced by the likes of Diplo, Skrillex, Dr. Luke, et al., which are genre-bending, euphoria-inducing kinds of madness.

Style.com caught up with Elliphant to chat while she was in Miami at the Red Bull Guest House for Mad Decent’s raging rooftop pool party during the Ultra 2014 music festival. Here’s what she had to say about Miley Cyrus wannabes, real fashion vs. bullshit fashion, and how she really feels about Sweden.

What are your thoughts on Ultra fashion so far?
I was expecting a little more Miley Cyrus, because I’ve been to music festivals in America and usually it’s, like, four thousand Miley Cyruses. But they don’t have the spirit that Miley has, so they just look stupid actually. They just stand, looking cold in their terrible outfits. It’s something that I really think is interesting in America. People here, they have, like, $200,000 sweet-16 parties for their kids. They buy them silicone boobs when they’re 16, but [the kids] can’t fuck until they get married. It’s fucking crazy. It’s a reflection of something that’s really shitty that’s going on in the new rich world. As long as you don’t have sex with anybody or you don’t make art, it’s fine with parents—as long as you run around and show your silicone boobs, it’s OK for people. For me, it’s really scary. I was expecting that a little more here.

Would you say you’re more into the comfort-comes-first, be-yourself kind of personal style?
Walking around in high heels looking uncomfortable is a waste of time, I think. I appreciate the production of high heels. Sometimes I see a pair of high heels and I almost get a hard-on, and I’m like, “Whoa! Those are nice.” But as soon as they’re on somebody, I’m like, “Ooh! That looks uncomfortable.” I own a superexpensive, almost $1,000 pair of heels. I’ve never worn them in my entire life—they’re just standing there like a reminder of what I’ll never do.

What are your thoughts on the intense style comebacks of the nineties club kids and the seventies/eighties punk? The Met’s Punk: Chaos to Couture comes to mind…
If you were wearing this twenty years ago, this would be a provocative state of mind. My mom was a punk—she had, like, needles in her face. She wasn’t that because she was embracing herself, she was doing that to be provocative against her strict family. She needed that. That was a revolution for her. For me, everything’s been open. I can wear whatever I want. I need to start embracing that—being a young woman in the new world where I don’t have to struggle to be who I am. But most people are in the deep patterns of the old, and it’s just a waste because you don’t need that shit now. You can really be yourself now.

You’re from Sweden—what do you think of the fashion/creative world over there?
Sweden represents H&M, Ikea, and Max Martin. We don’t have any wars, we didn’t have any conflicts in our country, we’ve had money for decades, we didn’t have any struggles. We are a perfect country. We’re born over the surface. You have food on the table, you have clothes on your body. We don’t make soulful music in Sweden—we make pop music, we make Ikea. It’s actually a big fucking crime what we’re doing in Sweden. We’re killing all of the people who want to make their own collections in the world. We kill them because we sell it cheaper and we make it impossible for the little person. Fuck Sweden!

Would you ever consider being the face of a fashion brand?
That’s not what I’m here for, so I’m not putting any focus on that. But if a person would get into my project and has some amazing ideas with clothes that could represent me and tell a message in a clear way, I’m down for that. Because for me, fashion is art. My sister’s been living in Paris for eight years. I’ve been to every fashion week there. I’ve seen real fashion. I know what it’s about. These people who make real fashion kill themselves every day. These are the artists. This is Van Gogh—they’re cutting their ears off. That’s what I stand for—the artists with great personalities in the world. I’m down with fashion, but it’s the bullshit fashion I’m so tired of that doesn’t mean anything.

Photo: Rob Snow / Red Bull Content Pool

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