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Editor Obsessions: Alexander McQueen’s Skull Handle Walking Cane

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Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

mcqueen

Sometimes, walking is difficult. Particularly if you, like me, favor towering spikes over sensible footwear. Clearly, Alexander McQueen understands this, which is why the brand offers my latest obsession: a skull-capped walking cane. In black and silver, this accouterment matches my entire wardrobe (not to mention my apartment—it’s going to be a great addition to my foyer). And to answer the question raised by the entire Style.com edit staff: No. I am not concerned about looking like The Penguin.

Alexander McQueen skull handle walking cane, $525, Buy it now

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

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EXCLUSIVE: Calvin Klein Goes Back to Its Roots for Net-a-Porter

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Calvin Klein

“It really is very DNA-driven, very Calvin,” Francisco Costa said of his new capsule for Net-a-Porter. Having last year celebrated his 10th anniversary at the house, Costa is more than well-versed in the Calvin Klein vernacular. And this 14-piece lineup, which debuts exclusively here, was created with the CK lifestyle in mind.

It’s a vision that NAP was quick to snap up. “We presented the collection as a lifestyle collection including jackets, trousers, sweaters, [and more]. Then they made an edit, and the edit turned out to be mostly dresses because it is the category we do so well with,” Costa said on a call from Water Mill, New York, where the luxury e-commerce giant was feting the collection with a private lunch. But it’s not just frocks here: Separates such as a crisp white maxi skirt, close-cut ribbed tops, a Lurex-laced pencil skirt, and a classic oxford all channel Costa’s signature, streamlined vision for the brand. A couple of pieces evoke Calvin Klein’s red-carpet coups. Fans of the salmon-hued T-shirt style that a very blond Emma Stone sported at the 2011 Golden Globes can pick up a spaghetti-strap number in a similar shade. A rosy maxi, meanwhile, will appeal to those coveting the sex appeal Jennifer Lawrence exuded when she wore a Calvin scoop-neck gown at the Oscars back in 2011.

Calvin Klein

Calvin Klein’s exclusive Net-a-Porter capsule collection launches August 1 on net-a-porter.com.

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Edie Campbell Wins the Magnolia Cup—Which Is Not a Modeling Award, by the Way

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Edie Campbell is no one-trick pony. The much-loved model, who is the face of countless new ad campaigns (Bottega Veneta, Lanvin, Saint Laurent, and Alexander McQueen among them), is also a competitive horsewoman in her (probably limited) spare time. This afternoon, she showed off her equestrian skills at the Glorious Goodwood Ladies Charity Race in Chichester, England, and took home the Magnolia Cup. According to British Vogue , it was admittedly a high-fashion horse race: Vivienne Westwood designed some of the jockeys’ uniforms, jeweler Theo Fennell dreamed up the sculpture prizes, and Tom Cruise handed out the awards. Campbell participated in the hopes of raising £10,000 for The Reading Agency, a charity that promotes the importance of reading for both children and adults. You can still sponsor her here.

Photo: via Instagram 

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Tim Blanks Remembers Alexander McQueen’s La Poupée

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Alexander McQueen

“The original idea was Jesus walking on water.” Who but Lee McQueen could get away with that? In today’s Throwback Thursdays video, Tim Blanks revisits McQueen’s vivid Spring ’97 show, where models very literally walked on water—or, at least, a splashy runway. Contrary to first impressions, the collection wasn’t riffing on religion. “It was about the restrictions of fashion, really,” McQueen said. His starting point was Hans Bellmer, an artist who took dolls apart and put them back together in “fetishistic,” slightly eerie ways. (Side note: Bellmer’s work will be exhibited in That Obscure Object of Desire, a show set to open at New York’s Luxembourg & Dayan gallery on August 14.) “It’s the way I view fashion, chopping the proportions to make you feel longer, smaller, thinner,” McQueen explained. He created surrealist corsets, and enlisted Shaun Leane to design jewelry and frame-like contraptions for each memorable look, but you really have to see it to believe it. Watch Tim’s video, then take a look at the full runway show, here.

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Heather Huey’s Hats Get Dark and Decadent

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Heather Huey

Entering milliner Heather Huey’s apartment, a fourth-floor walk-up in a heavily graffitied building in Bushwick, is a surreal shock. With rustic dark wood furniture, raw brick walls, and sewing supplies strewn across the center table, her home-cum-studio resembles something from another era. The walls are covered with the designer’s architectural “cage” garments, as well as her fiancé Billy Kidd’s black-and-white photographs. And then, against the back wall, there’s the 6-foot-high cabinet filled with her hats.

Huey makes the most spectacular—often one-of-a-kind—cranial confections. So when she invited me to preview her latest outing, which debuts exclusively here, I jumped at the chance. Fall ’14, the first collection Huey has designed since last year’s Pleated Project, boasts sculptural toppers crafted from manipulated black felt, distorted rosettes, tulle veils, feathers, chiffon-coated crystals, beads, and more. The embellished lineup is a departure for Huey, who usually focuses on form rather than frills. Though, as the designer tells it, “I love looking at old movies from the ’40s and ’50s. I’m such an admirer of the elaborate headpieces you see in them, so I thought I might as well just make my own versions and get that out of my system.” After seeing the results, like a beaded headband befitting a Spanish queen or an origami-ed bow-topped number that ever-so-slightly tilts to cover the forehead, I selfishly hope she hasn’t quenched her craving for such styles. But if this first foray into decoration is, in fact, her last, at least it packs a punch.

Heather Huey

“I had accumulated all these random trims that my sister gave me,” Huey continued of the range, which looks like it belongs in a dark, decadent fairy tale—or, as she described it, “Marie Antoinette-meets-Man Ray.” “And they inspired me to start working on something that was a bit more regal. Something that had a little bit more pomp and circumstance.” Huey carefully fastened an abstract fedora—garnished with gauzy blooms and a lone feather—to the left side of her head. “Nothing too extreme, though,” she deadpanned.

In addition to these one-off designs, Huey sells a selection of everyday(ish) toppers, including expertly shaped straw sun hats, critter-inspired fascinators sold at Kiki de Montparnasse, and rhinestone rabbit ears, which I recently purchased for my own collection. It’s Huey’s special concoctions, however, that bring her the most joy. “I was raised in Ridgewood, Queens. Everything was always very low-key,” Huey recalled, while sitting in her living room in loose khaki pants and a faded gray tee. “I love dressing up, but within five minutes of walking out the door, I feel very self-conscious. I wish I were that woman, but in reality, it’s just not me.” She rarely wears her own hats, leaving that pleasure to models, pop stars like Rihanna, and eccentrics like Michelle Harper. But in making them for others, she gets her fix.

For more information, visit heatherhuey.com.

Photos: Billy Kidd

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