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April 21 2014

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Chinese Models Break Barriers in Beauty and Business

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Photo: Tommy Ton

“Sometimes a Westerner will say to channel the thirties or forties during a photo shoot,” says New York-based model Xiao Wen Ju. “I want to tell them what China was up to then…it would terrify them!” She’s referring, of course, to the violent upheaval of a 3,000-year-old dynastic system, civil war, Japanese aggression, and Communist rule that characterized much of China’s past century.

Modeling—and fashion at large—are relatively new phenomena in modern China. It wasn’t even until 1979 that the country saw its first-ever fashion show when Pierre Cardin presented twelve French models to a bureaucratic, Mao-suit-clad crowd at Beijing’s Cultural Palace of Minorities. Today, roughly thirty-five years later, the greater China region has grown to become the world’s second-largest luxury goods market and boasts a ferocious appetite that’s largely dictating the terms of a $300 billion industry.

In the last decade, however, one contingent of girls—excuse me, women—has inadvertently become de facto cultural ambassadresses who are softly wielding their influence in meaningful ways. They are the industry’s leading Chinese models, including Du Juan, Liu Wen, Xiao Wen Ju, Xi Mengyao (or Ming Xi), Sui He, Wang Xiao, Fei Fei Sun, and Shu Pei Qin, among others, and they are introducing new notions of beauty back home in the East while simultaneously breaking racial stereotypes in the West.

It was the trailblazing Shanghai beauty Du Juan who paved the way. Following her big break—being featured on Vogue China and Paris Vogue covers in the fall of 2005—she participated in the four big fashion weeks of New York, London, Milan, and Paris. “I remember being the only Asian model at Chanel’s Spring 2006 Couture show,” she recounts. “So many backstage photographers would ask me if I was from Japan or Korea. When I would tell them that I was from China, I felt so proud.”

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Photo: Matt Irwin / Style.com PRINT

Though she is the epitome of what constitutes classic, conventional beauty in mainland China—she has wide eyes, a high nose bridge, and petite lips—Du Juan enabled those who followed to successfully fill an industry void at a time when Eastern faces were hardly choice. “There were only two or three of us Asian models back then,” she explains. “But the competition was still intense because the shows didn’t want Eastern faces, and if they did, they only wanted one.”

Since then, the number of Asian models has almost doubled from 5.4 percent to 10.1 percent from 2008 to 2013, according to Jezebel’s New York Fashion Week racial diversity report—Givenchy showed its Spring 2011 Couture collection in Paris on an all-Asian cast. Other brands, like Alexander McQueen, Fendi, Lanvin, Louis Vuitton, and Valentino, have even taken measures to stage elaborate runway productions (similar to Mr. Cardin’s) in Beijing or Shanghai.

Chinese models have also been placed in barrier-breaking campaigns in the West. The Hunan-born model Liu Wen, for example, was the first Chinese model cast for international beauty brand Estée Lauder and as an alluring Victoria’s Secret Angel. “I want people to gain a deeper understanding toward Chinese models and not just think that we are only suited to wear red,” she says. “Even a lot of Chinese people will think that we are demure, so I hope to spread a more empowering image of Asian beauty that is characterized by strength and personality.”

For model Xiao Wen Ju, her unconventional looks made for a rocky start to modeling. “Girls love to look at themselves in the mirror, right? But every time I would look at myself, I would just think that I looked so unattractive,” she says. “When I first began modeling outside of China, people would ask me, ‘How can you be so pretty?’ I was shocked.”

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Photo: Greg Kessler

It was only then that she stopped using double-stick tape for her eyelids and exaggerating her makeup to make her eyes look bigger (both are requisites for go-sees in mainland China), and the industry and fans alike responded in kind. “I was so happy when I saw Weibo and Instagram—people in China were talking about me, like, ‘Xiao is so good, she was so brave to be herself.’ Before I came [to New York], I wanted to change who I was, but now I really love it.”

Other bold statements, like Fei Fei Sun’s January 2013 Vogue Italia cover, shot by photographer Steven Meisel; Ming Xi’s buoyant energy in an SS’14 Diesel campaign captured by Inez & Vinoodh; or Sui He as a fierce face for Shiseido, shot by Nick Knight, have helped move the diversity needle, but there’s still a long way to go. VFiles’ Model Files series recently spoofed the growing demand for Asians in modeling by creating a fictitious all-Asian modeling agency called The Asiancy, which ultimately drew attention to the industry’s overwhelming whiteness.

“There certainly are many more Asian women on the runways and rosters of modeling agencies than before,” says veteran casting director Jennifer Starr, who gave both Wang Xiao and Sui He their breaks with CK One and Ralph Lauren, respectively, in 2011. “There’s even an Asian woman representing a major [Western] cosmetics brand. Yes, things are changing. We need to applaud that change, educate people on the need to continue in that direction, and to make the pages of our magazines and our runways as culturally diverse as the streets of our global cities.”

Ollie Henderson Starts A Riot

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Ollie Henderson—model, artist, musician, and activist—is a pretty damn impressive young lady. Via one hundred DIY T-shirts that she painted herself, the 23-year-old Australian native (though she’s currently based in New York) launched a new initiative, Start the Riot, at Mercedez-Benz Fashion Week Australia. “The basic premise is to encourage young people to become politically aware and involved,” Henderson told Style.com. “There’s a lot going on in Australia that I don’t agree with. I was tired of the government making decisions on my behalf, and I just felt like I had to do this.” The T-shirts, which models and designers have been sporting around MBFWA, are printed with phrases like “Welfare Over Wealth,” “Save the Reef,” “Reject Racism,” and “Welcome Refugees, Save Lives.” The latter is a cause about which Henderson is particularly passionate. “It’s a human right to seek asylum, and welcoming refugees can only make our country better. We have a lot of people coming over with the hope of establishing a life somewhere other than their war-torn countries, and they’re put in detention centers, which don’t really have pathways to help the refugees get settled anywhere,” she explained emphatically. “Imagine spending your entire life savings to get on a dangerous boat, or sending your 9-year-old child off by herself so she doesn’t get killed and has the opportunity for education, which everyone should have. These people aren’t just seeking a better life because they’re fed up with the one they’ve got—they’re seeking a life.”

Henderson has also launched a Start the Riot Facebook page in order to encourage discussion, as well as a zine, which was handed out at the Desert Designs show on Monday. The model, who told us she collects vintage goggles (during this interview, she sported a pair that her father had given her for Christmas with her protest tee) has yet-to-be-revealed plans to expand the project, and asks that supporters continue to keep their eyes open. As for why she decided to kick things off with a range of T-shirts, Henderson offered, “Fashion is a big part of our lives. We consciously choose what we wear every day, and it’s a great medium to express how you feel. It’s really empowering that you can spread a message to the world about your thoughts, feelings, and beliefs through your clothes.” Right on.

Photo: via keishikibi.com

Marc Jacobs Casts Fall Campaign Via Social Media

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“Oh, you’re a model. Who’s your agency? Instagram?” Easy as it may be to pimp oneself out on the platform, the general consensus here at Style.com is that selfie-snapping should be kept to a minimum. The Internet is not your portfolio and iPhone pics are not your headshots. Marc Jacobs, however, has decided to add fuel to the photographic frenzy. Marc by Marc Jacobs is taking a page out of Nicola Formichetti’s book and plans to find a fresh face for fall via social media. #CastMeMarc began yesterday and runs through April 9. For rules, info, and a chance to star in the brand’s campaign, visit MarcJacobs.com

David Beckham’s Beachy New Briefs

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David BeckhamAsk any girl about her favorite Super Bowl ad and she’ll likely reference the David Beckham Bodywear commercial for H&M (in which the tattooed heartthrob scales a building in his undies, ICYMI). It certainly sparked our attention. So it comes as no surprise that the now-retired British footballer is also introducing a range of men’s swimwear for the Swedish retailer. The line includes Speedo-esque briefs alongside slightly more conservative trunks, all in shades of white, olive green, and navy. The icing on the cake? Each style is modeled by Beckham himself. “We’ve worked to create new classics for men, with great fit, comfort, and also style,” he told The Telegraph. The collection will hit stores on May 22. World-famous abs (unfortunately) not included.

Photo: H&M 

Gisele Bündchen’s Blondie Moment

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We love a multitalented model, so we were pleasantly surprised to hear that Gisele Bündchen is going back into the studio for a new H&M campaign. If you recall, the super teamed up with H&M last fall to record The Kinks’ “All Day and All of the Night,” with each song purchase benefitting UNICEF. This time around, Bündchen is recording a cover of Blondie’s “Heart of Glass” with French music producer Bob Sinclar. “I never in a million years thought I would record a song and work with a producer like Bob,” she said. The song and video will be released in May.

Photo: Courtesy of H&M