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August 2 2014

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Tokyo Street Style And Spring 2010: Do You See The Connections?

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It’s no secret we’re obsessed with street style photos. And from the looks of the runways, we aren’t the only ones. Clicking through Tokyo blogs like Dropsnap.jp and Fashionsnap.com, we noticed a strong link between the snapshots from Harajuku and Shibuya and the trends that emerged in the Spring 2010 collections. Denim-on-denim? Boho layers? Post-apocalyptic chic? The kids in Tokyo did them first. Designers get their ideas from all over and filter them in their own ways, but there’s no denying that these young Japanese women (and men) know what’s hip months, sometimes years before the rest of us, and they’re as influential now as they’ve ever been.

Click for a slideshow and let us know below, do you see the similarities?

 

 

 

Photo: Marcio Madeira

 

Tie-Dye: Tired Or To Die For?

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Are the eighties over as a source of fashion inspiration? Tommy Ton’s recent street-style photos seem to indicate a move toward easier seventies styles, and we found further evidence of the trend in the tie-dyed looks that brightened the Spring runways. “There’s something about tie-dye that speaks to everyone,” says Tory Burch, adding, “it’s a little nostalgic but also feels modern.” If Blumarine‘s caftan belongs cheerfully in the former camp, Proenza Schouler‘s Lazaro Hernandez and Jack McCollough gave the dyeing technique new life by applying it to sleek and of-the-moment active-sports styles. Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte, meanwhile, pieced together ragged, postapocalyptic looks using fabric usually associated with long-haired flower children. Are you ready for the re-dawning of the Age of Aquarius?



Click for a slideshow and let us know, below.

Photo: Marcio Madeira

Are You Ready For Web 3.0?

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Call it a sign of the times. With the old world order seemingly hanging by a thread, designers kept things together by lacing and tying and weaving outfits all over the Spring runways. At Celine, Etro, and D&G, the approach was fairly straightforward, with looks lashed shut safari-style. Things got more interesting at Gareth Pugh, Mark Fast, and Temperley London, where the webbing became an integral part of a garment’s construction. “We used lacing to reference woven textures in Egyptian art, weaving raw leather strips across shoes, leggings, and into knits as a harder contrast to our soft draped silk pieces,” explained Ohne Titel‘s Alexa Adams and Flora Gill. The result? Looks we’d happily get tangled in.


Click for a slideshow and tell us if you’re ready to get tied down.

 

 

 

Photo: Marcio Madeira

 

Will You Borrow From The Boys?

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The tomboy trend continues apace for Spring. You saw it in the plethora of pantsuits, and it surfaced in some of the active sports references to linebackers and latter-day Jacques Cousteaus. But the crisp white men’s shirt will always be the easiest (and, for us, coolest) way to get the look. Giambattista Valli topped a fanciful fringe skirt with a utilitarian button-down, and Limi Feu whipped an oxford into wildly oversized proportions. The tuxedo shirt, meanwhile, was reimagined by Nicolas Ghesquière at Balenciaga and Phoebe Philo at Celine, among others. “A tux shirt on a girl always looks great,” says Rag & Bone‘s Marcus Wainwright. “It has the obvious connotations…girl in boyfriend’s/husband’s/one-night stand’s shirt the morning after a black-tie ball. It’s very James Bond.” That’s a good enough reason for us to button up. What about you?


Click for a slideshow and tell us whether or not you’ll adopt the trend.

Photo: Marcio Madeira

Are You Prepared To Go Bare?

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Bras, corsets, tap pants, and briefs were exposed all over the Spring runways, with unexpected designers like Akris‘ Albert Kriemler joining lingerie lovers such as Jean Paul Gaultier and John Galliano at the panty party. No doubt about it, innerwear as outerwear is one of the season’s top trends. But does the look work off the catwalk? Can you really show up to a meeting dressed as Madonna in her Like a Virgin phrase? We asked the experts.


“Naturally, I’m not hoping to see a lot of inappropriate bare skin and literal lingerie showing in the workplace,” says Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo. “I’m foreseeing a spike in lace-edge slips emerging from hemlines and sheer, pretty hosiery again.” However, if you are thinking literal, “the best way to wear lingerie is to take it out of context,” explains Fabiola Beracasa, who’s been known to rock a black corset over a white tee. “And make sure it’s delicate and expensive-looking, not trashy,” says stylist Kate Young. Her Spring pick? Stella McCartney‘s plunge-front nude lace halter. A couple of hard and fast rules: Exposed elastic bra straps are a no-no, only silk will do (Jean Yu); and if you do experiment with transparency, don’t leave home without a jacket (Kelly Cutrone). And, finally, this from a master of the seductive arts, Domenico Dolce: “Don’t be too audacious. Save something for the imagination.”


Click for a slideshow, then share your thoughts on the etiquette of exposed lingerie below.

Photo: Monica Feudi / GoRunway.com