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July 12 2014

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59 posts tagged "3.1 Phillip Lim"

Take Five: Tracy Sedino’s Warehouse of Vintage Sunglasses

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Fashion folk are a curious bunch, and we’ve found that they tend to collect equally curious things. In our “Take Five” feature, we get the lowdown on our favorite industry personalities’ most treasured trinkets.

Vintage Linda Farrow Glasses

There won’t be enough sun-filled English days in this lifetime for Tracy Sedino to wear each pair of vintage shades in the Linda Farrow archive. “Oh, my god, I must have thousands,” she said last week at a dinner in New York. Sedino was behind the revival of the Linda Farrow brand, whose namesake designer worked with houses such as Yves Saint Laurent and Emilio Pucci to create glasses in the seventies and eighties. Farrow closed her business to start a family in the late eighties, and her crates of luxurious lenses were stored away in a London warehouse.

Over a decade later, Sedino—then a student at the London College of Fashion—began dating (and has since married) Farrow’s son, Simon Jablon. “His father had some warehouses,” Sedino recalled. “And he asked Simon to get rid of all the stock, because they were getting turned into residential properties. So I went with him, and we found original Pucci and YSL sunglasses piled three-floors high.” Obviously, their discovery couldn’t go to waste, so she and Jablon used it as a jumping-off point and rebooted the house of Linda Farrow. They sold some of the vintage styles but, more notably, began partnering with young talents to turn out glamorous—and often outrageous—designs. (Remember those Jeremy Scott Minnie Mouse shades? That was their doing). Today, the husband-and-wife team continues the company in Farrow’s spirit and makes glasses for everyone from Dries Van Noten, 3.1 Phillip Lim, and Suno to Alexander Wang, Peter Pilotto, and The Row. “We thought there was a massive gap in the market,” said Sedino of her and Jablon’s decision to relaunch Linda Farrow. “You have these big luxury houses that sign licensing deals, but other designers, like Dries, will never do that, because they value their brands too much. We wanted to reinforce what Simon’s mother did in the seventies by working with designers to create eyewear as a fashion accessory, rather than a licensed product.”

Sedino and Jablon celebrated their company’s (and their relationship’s) tenth anniversary this year. And to mark the milestone, the duo have not only offered up a ten-year capsule collection but also opened a pop-up shop in collaboration with BOFFO, right here in NYC. The store, which is located at the Chelsea SuperPier, and open through December 24, boasts a bevy of Linda Farrow’s most covetable products. As for that archive of vintage sunnies, Sedino told us that it’s a constant point of reference. “We don’t want our collections to be too vintage, so we take inspiration from the vintage styles, and incorporate new technology and materials,” she said. Here, Sedino talks us through her five favorite pairs of old-school Linda Farrow frames.

1. “These are acetate Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties. They’re my holiday pair. I love them because the idea and design are fun, and they’re quite comfortable on my face. Ironically, it’s hard for me to find sunglasses that fit—for Asians, it’s difficult to find pairs that sit on the nose bridge. I’ve been wearing these for the last two years, and I’m particularly inspired their shape, because they’re almost like a big chunky Wayfarer. You can really wear them whenever.”

2. “These are Yves Saint Laurent glasses from the early seventies. They’re kind of a round Jackie O style. They’re handmade in acetate, with metal arms. This pair is a one-off, so we don’t have stock anymore. They’re one of my favorite styles, because they’re the perfect size. But I don’t really wear them, because I’m afraid of losing them.”

3. “These are Linda Farrow glasses from the eighties, and they were kind of inspired by Lolita. Whenever stylists call in for Lolita-style frames, we send them these. I wear them all the time in the summer.”

4. “These are amazing. This is another YSL pair from the seventies. They’re not one-of-a-kind—we still have a few—but not many. The lenses are polarized, and because of the orange, they’re my autumn glasses.”

5. “This is the most iconic Linda Farrow style. I love how the sides are beveled. We’ve actually launched a fine-jewelry collection of 18-karat-gold-and-diamond sunglasses, and this is one of the styles we used.”

Photo: John Munro

Shop the Look: Electric Feel

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Shop the Look: Electric Feel

Oh, the weather outside is frightful…but bright furs are so delightful. Real or faux, furs in electric hues are the savviest way to keep warm this season. However, if you’re questioning the life span of a candy-colored fur bag, take note: This isn’t just a winter trend. Between the expressionist coats at Prada and the fuzzy bags, jewelry, and Buggies at Fendi, bold fur had a major warm-weather moment on the Spring ’14 runways. Go big in a nearly neon coat, or add just a hint of fluff with a covetable key chain. Shop all of our favorite colorful pieces by 3.1 Phillip Lim, Fendi, Topshop, and more, below.

1. Topshop collarless faux-fur coat, $170, available at topshop.com

2. 3.1 Phillip Lim Ryder multi-fur shoulder bag, $1,350, available at avenue32.com

3. Albertus Swanepoel fur bomb cap, $290, available at barneys.com

4) Fendi textured-leather-and-fox monster bag charm, $580, available at net-a-porter.com

5. Nicholas Kirkwood mink-trimmed leather sandals, $1,777, available at mytheresa.com

Photo: Courtesy Photo

On the Fringe

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Fringe at GucciWith the holidays in full swing, we’re in a festive spirit here at Style.com. And when it comes to party looks, we’re feeling for fringe—the stuff was all over the Spring ’14 runways. Imagine twirling on the dance floor in the white leather jacket from Altuzarra, or shimmying about in Emilio Pucci’s glam poncho. Decorative tassels added an artisanal touch at Dries Van Noten, Marc Jacobs, and Alexander Wang, while dense, carpetlike shag turned up at Proenza Schouler and 3.1 Phillip Lim. If a full-on fringy outfit is too much for you, get the look with a bohemian handbag similar to the ones we spotted at Céline, Valentino, and Gucci.

Here, a slideshow of our favorite fringed pieces.

Gingham’s Checkered Present

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Balmain Spring '14Gingham typically stirs up feelings of nostalgia, but lately designers are doing their part to modernize the classic checks. Derek Lam opened his Spring show with eight crisply tailored, crosshatched looks; Delpozo creative director Josep Font paired the graphic pattern with cheerful sunflowers; and Olivier Rousteing put his signature glam spin on the trend at Balmain with plaid bomber jackets and kicky skirts accompanied by chunky chain jewelry. As seen on the 3.1 Phillip Lim and Mark McNairy New Amsterdam menswear runways, buffalo-plaid pieces have been earning style points with the guys, too. Meanwhile, model off duty Marine Deleeuw looked like Lolita incarnate in her sweet pink-and-white shirtdress, and we spotted plenty of gingham items from Prada’s cinematic Fall ’13 collection in the streets. As Isaac Mizrahi told Style.com a few years ago at a Resort presentation, “Gingham is like a solid with a lot of personality.” Agreed.

Here, a slide show of Spring’s gingham highlights.

Fringe With Benefits

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Fringe from Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs, and Sister by Sibling

Fringe, in every length, style, and color, has been adding a playful kick to the Spring ’14 collections. It surfaced early in NYC, namely at 3.1 Phillip Lim and Ralph Rucci. The former showed fringe on punctuated-block tops in Neapolitan hues, while the latter offered an evening gown tiered in fiber-optic strands that radiated with synthetic rainbow phosphorescence (“eyelashes,” Rucci called the textile).

At Rodarte, Kate and Laura Mulleavy paid homage to their beloved Los Angeles, attaching long tassels to trash-fab grommeted belts and heavy leather skirts. Proenza Schouler‘s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez whipped up a lattice-patterned overcoat in shredded fabric—scraps of which were dip-dyed crimson red, and Marc Jacobs enhanced his collection’s Victorian vibe via bunches of fluid thread (above, center). Meanwhile, Francisco Costa—who celebrated ten years at the helm of Calvin Klein—also implemented fringe on a number of sporty silhouettes (above, left), breathing a reinvigorated rawness into his famed streamlined aesthetic.

The trend has been spotted out of the gate in London, too. Sister by Sibling used drapery tassels on netted skirts (above, right), while Holly Fulton employed wispy stranding on topcoats at her seventies-influenced outing. Of the fringe effect, New York’s Fivestory owner Claire Distenfeld told Style.com, “Amazing elements from the past are back in full force, including fringe. As a romantic, I’m ready to embrace it.”

Photos: IndigitalImages.com