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8 posts tagged "Ace Hotel"

Opening Ceremony Heads to Shoreditch

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magritteOpening Ceremony fans in London’s trendy Shoreditch neighborhood are in for a treat. The Ace Hotel, a longtime OC collaborator, will debut a pop-up shop at its Shoreditch location at the end of July. (If you’ll recall, the Ace Hotel in New York City also opened an OC pop-up in 2010.) WWD reports that the Max Lamb-designed store will pop up at 106 High Street.

In addition to Opening Ceremony’s men’s and women’s collections, the shop will sell the new René Magritte capsule (pictured) and pieces by local NewGen designers Faustine Steinmetz and Marques’Almeida.

The pop-up coincides with the temporary closing of OC’s Covent Garden shop, which will undergo renovations.

Don’t Wait a Minute More, L.A. Acne is Waiting for You Downtown

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Acne's L.A. Store

Acne's L.A. Store

Acne Studios is heading to Downtown L.A. Tomorrow, the Swedish brand will open its largest store in the world (and its second stateside location) in the city’s Eastern Columbia Building—a thirteen-story 1930s art-deco landmark with a deep blue and decorative gold facade. “It started with the building, to be honest,” creative director Jonny Johansson told Style.com of his decision to decamp to an unexpected part of the city rather than one of its high-gloss shopping locales. “We can afford to not do what people think has to be done,” he continued. “And we always work with the concept of the space—we like to find somewhere historic and interesting, and then do something contemporary inside.”

The 5,000-square-foot, single-level space was based on Johansson’s own vision. “I tried to not learn the history of the building,” he said. “I just wanted it to speak to me.” The result is a futuristic interior with exposed columns and structural details that fit Johansson’s concept of modernity. The formatted rows of merchandise are expansive, as the store houses Acne’s men’s and women’s ready-to-wear and denim, as well as bags, accessories, and footwear. Though sleek and structural, the design actually embraces Johansson’s desire for privacy. “When you walk through the store, you see columns that create these private areas,” he said, referring to the mazelike floor plan. “I like to stay a little bit more private when I shop, and I think this structure allows for that.” Meanwhile, the flagship’s adjoining ilcaffè coffee shops—one of Johansson’s favorite spots back home—will offer customers a true taste of Stockholm.

Acne Scarf

Shifting the paradigm of what downtown means to the L.A. fashionscape, Acne’s L.A. flagship seems to be a beacon of what’s to come. Rumors of Aesop and A.P.C.’s arrival are swirling, and the new Ace Hotel down the street is receiving the finishing touches for an early 2014 bow. But at present, local shoppers have plenty to be excited about: In addition to the new store, Johansson has designed a limited-edition scarf (above) that boasts a print of the brand’s new SoCal home. Naturally, it’s available exclusively in L.A.

Acne Studios opens this Wednesday in the Eastern Columbia Building, 855 South Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90014.

Photos: Courtesy of Acne Studios

Dita in 3-D

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“I can get out of a lot of things, but this dress is not one of them,” said burlesque star Dita Von Teese of the gown she donned to last night’s party at the Ace Hotel. The dress in question was the first fully articulated 3-D printed garment, which was conceptualized by designer Michael Schmidt. And the party, which drew the likes of Debbie Harry, Bob Gruen, and Andrej Pejic, served to toast its unveiling. “I was interested in finding the middle ground between the world of mathematics and the world of ephemeral beauty,” Schmidt told Style.com. The L.A.-based designer, who has crafted looks for stars like Madonna, Cher, and Lady Gaga (the latter wore his glass-bubble costume on the cover of Rolling Stone in 2009), conceived Von Teese’s frock with Fibonacci’s Golden Ratio in mind.

With the help of computational designer and architect Francis Bitonti, Schmidt used 3-D software to realize his space-age gown (think cinched waist and steroidal shoulders). The dress began as a digital rendering, which was then engineered in powdered nylon by high-tech collaborator Shapeways. “As an architect, it’s all about dealing with facades, and this was just about making a curvy one,” mused Bitonti. The body-skimming dress featured an undulating mesh silhouette of three thousand articulated joints fashioned out of layered nylon powder. As if that weren’t complicated enough, it also boasted twelve thousand Swarovski black crystals, which were painstakingly placed by hand after printing. “It’s obviously very futuristic, but I tried to retain a level of old-world glamour that was befitting of Dita,” added Schmidt. Indeed, the Blade Runner-meets-Bettie Page ensemble was worthy of the millennial pinup. “It’s superlight,” Von Teese mused later that evening after slipping into a demure Roland Mouret shift. But was it comfortable? “The only uncomfortable part is that I needed to be very cautious about how I walked. I had to make sure my heels wouldn’t get stuck in the hem.” Even in the future, glamour’s got its obstacles.

Photo: Jeff Meltz

Bedtime For Band

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What the well-dressed napper will be wearing this season: Band of Outsiders’ new drawstring cotton PJ sets, available exclusively at Opening Ceremony’s Ace Hotel location. The styling gurus at OC recommend you wear these with a fitted cap and a judicious flash of leg. Technically, these jammies are men’s—the better to kit out aspiring Hefs, we guess, though these are cotton, not silk—but sleepy ladies should note they come in a lovely candy-striped pink version, too.

$320, available at Opening Ceremony, 1190-1192 Broadway, NYC, (646) 695-5680.

Photo: Courtesy of Opening Ceremony

E-mail Chains Of The Stars: A Style.com Investigation (UPDATED!)

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Update: Solange weighed in via Twitter to fill in the missing link in the chain. The friend who sent her “Stillness Is the Move” cover to Grizzly Bear’s Chris Taylor is Ethan Silverman, who co-founded Terrible Records with Taylor and runs Silverhawk Management with Molly Hawkins. We’ve added him below.

One day, Solange Knowles was Beyoncé’s radio-friendly little sister. And then, practically overnight, she became a cool-kid sensation, headlining one of the biggest parties of fashion week, the Opening Ceremony/Ace Hotel opening party, where she was backed by indie favorites the Dirty Projectors. That’s no accident: Solange shot to the top of the Pitchfork charts with an inspired cover of the Projectors’ “Stillness Is the Move.” How did Solange and the band come together? A new interview with New York magazine has the answer, which involves a complicated trail of e-mails that brings together the music, fashion, and general art-weirdo (we’re looking at you, Björk) worlds. Our crack team has assembled this helpful infographic to explain.

In the words of Knowles:

“I sent it [her recording of the song] to one friend, who sent it to [Grizzly Bear’s] Chris Taylor, and he sent it to some of my friends in Chairlift, and one of my friends in Chairlift sent it to one of the guys in Dirty Projectors, and one of the guys in Dirty Projectors somehow sent it to Bjööööörk. And if you write that, you have to make it sing like I just did. And a good friend of mine, [designer] Jeremy Scott, sent me a message saying that Björk sent it to him. So I pretty much did cartwheels for ten hours straight.”

Case closed.

Photos: Seth Browarnik/startraksphoto.com (Solange, Chairlift): Courtesy Press Here Publicity (Chris Taylor); CAMERA PRESS / Retna Ltd. (Dirty Projectors); Dave Allocca/startraksphoto.com (Bjork); NICK HUNT / PatrickMcMullan.com (Jeremy Scott)