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April 16 2014

styledotcom New technology aims to make the clothes you see on the street instantly shoppable. Too far? stylem.ag/1jIQKdb

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49 posts tagged "Acne"

Federico Marchetti Adds Art to Yoox’s Oeuvre

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Federico MarchettiThe impressive second-quarter results posted recently by the Yoox Group, Italy’s e-commerce giant, was further proof that the future of high fashion lies online. But can CEO Federico Marchetti (left) work the same magic with fine art? It has been on his mind since he launched Yoox fourteen years ago. “I’ve always had the notion of the one-stop shop, with a mixture of modern and vintage, clothes and furniture,” he says. “The art component is the one that closes the circle.”

Marchetti tested the waters last October with Damien Hirst, Grayson Perry, and the first-ever edition by Italy’s top Pop artist Francesco Vezzoli. “He did it to help earthquake relief in Emilia-Romagna, where I’m from,” explains Marchetti. “We did an edition of 399 priced at 399 euros, dollars, or pounds.” Yoox is now providing corporate sponsorship for Vezzoli’s Trinity, a series of three exhibitions in three cities, the first in Rome now until November 24, the second opening at New York’s MoMA PS1 in the fall, and the third at the Museum of Contemporary Art in L.A. in early winter.

But any multimillion-dollar business can cough up sponsorship dollars. It was Padiglione Crepaccio (below), the much humbler Yoox initiative during the opening days of the Venice Biennale, which cast a more interesting light on Marchetti’s intentions in the art world. Curator Caroline Corbetta assembled work by ten Venetian artists under 30—the sort of creative types who are usually overlooked when the Biennale’s grand caravan rolls into town every two years—and exhibited the result in the house where three of them live. (A very nice piece of old Venice it was, too, calculated to make starving artists everywhere else in the world utterly puce with envy.) The twist was that the exhibition preview was online. “Like Saatchi, but in reverse,” says Marchetti. “Everyone else got to see it online before the art-world elite got there.” Which didn’t stop heavy hitters like Vezzoli, Diesel’s Renzo Rosso, and cherished art-world provocateur Maurizio Cattelan (a patron saint to young Italian artists) from showing up in person at the opening.

Padiglione Crepaccio at Yoox.comWith his Acne jeans and his Lobb shoes, Marchetti is almost correct when he describes himself as the Yoox customer. And he was setting a good example by shopping for art at Padiglione Crepaccio. (In keeping with the initiative, it was only possible to buy the pieces on the iPads provided, even if you were standing right in front of the art and the artist). Right now, Marchetti is picturing art on Yoox as “something like a TV talent show, 99 percent talent, 1 percent the special X factor.” But going forward, he imagines people picking up “a pair of jeans and a painting” when they visit the site. “It’s part of the plan to make yoox.com a playful lifestyle,” he adds. “But playful in a serious way. It’s not the Amazon approach. We’re serious about collaboration.” Serious enough, in fact, to partner with the legendary photo agency Magnum—its first venture into e-commerce—and Hirst’s publishing company, Other Criteria.

But when Marchetti insists, “Surprise is the beauty of Yoox,” I flip back to the young artists in Venice, in particular a painter called Thomas Braida. With talent like his in the equation, people are going to be picking up way more than one painting with their pair of jeans.

Photos: David Needleman (Federico Marchetti); Courtesy of Yoox

Riding Dirty

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Louise du Toit wearing a shirt from Acne's capsule collectionAcne Studios has rarely met an out-of-the-box idea it hasn’t liked. So though for most labels, publishing its own limited-edition collection of rodeo-rider portraits from a mid-century physique photographer wouldn’t be the first order of business, here it is. And so last night, with its usual clutch of models in tow—Hanne Gaby Odiele, Jacquelyn Jablonski, Ji Hye Park, et al.—Acne launched Rodeo, a hardbound book of photos from the collection of New Yorker critic Vince Aletti. Must be something in the air lately. As Hedi Slimane’s latest editorial suggested: Cowboys—they’re a thing.

 

Bruce of Los Angeles, little-known except among physique-photo aficionados, has nevertheless been influential among later photographers. Aletti traced elements of his style in the work of Mapplethorpe, Herb Ritts, and Bruce Weber. (The similarities were in some cases so striking, you could probably have bylined the book Bruce of Los Weber.) “It’s clear that he’s looked at it and had some appreciation of this period of work,” Aletti said between tête-à-têtes with Fran Lebowitz last night. “And I’d imagine he knows [of] some other photographer named Bruce.”

 

Unlike much of the photographer’s oeuvre, these rodeo shots are naturalistic, of real guys (rather than models) in their own clothes (rather than nude). Of course, exceptions apply. In any case, Acne took the opportunity to create a little capsule collection of clothes around them, too, for those who prefer to wear, rather than page through, their vintage beefcake. There are T-shirts, glammy cowboy boots stitched with appliqués of cowboys, and the traffic-stopping shirt modeled last night by the label’s Louise du Toit, available at Acne shops now.

Photo: Courtesy of Acne

Thom Browne’s Tokyo Drift

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Thom Browne is on a roll. The FLOTUS favorite received a nomination for the CFDA’s Menswear Designer of the Year Award last night, and today, WWD announced that Browne is bowing a flagship in Tokyo. Slated to open on Saturday, Browne’s new boutique is set in the Aoyama district, in the same building as the recently launched Acne store (less immediate neighbors include Prada, Undercover, and Marc Jacobs). Being Thom Browne, the designer wanted his 4,500-square-foot space to be a full-on experience, and to seem as “non-retail as possible.” As for his Japanese fans, Browne says they’ve been some of his strongest supporters from the start. “They understand what I do better than most people around the world,” he told WWD. The boutique marks Browne’s second stand-alone store—the first being in Tribeca.

Photo: Marcus Tondo/InDigital/GoRunway

Tip of the Hat

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Thanks to European labels like Saint Laurent, Acne Studios, and Costume National, hats—mainly casual versions with wide brims—are a well-established Spring ’13 trend. But here in the USA, it’s National Hat Day. And while milliners across the pond (like Stephen Jones, Philip Treacy, Piers Atkinson, and Maison Michel) get lots of love from the fashion set, we’d like to use the holiday to tip our toppers to homegrown headgear talent. Take CFDA winner Eugenia Kim, for instance. Her sweet kitten-ear felt caps were a big hit this fall, and her bright feather-embellished fedoras can be worn with most anything. Satya Twena crafts everything from easy-to-wear fedoras to out-there studded fascinators, and Jason Wu included floppy feminine hats in his debut Miss Wu collection. On the more eccentric side, we have milliner Heather Huey, whose conceptual chapeaux (left)—which range from bejeweled bunny ears to sculpted, twisted takes on more traditional styles—have appeared in magazines such as Vogue, W, and Interview . Whether or not you deem yourself a “hat person,” National Hat Day is the perfect excuse to experiment with topping off your look. And, considering each of the designers above is based in New York, you won’t have to go too far to do so.

Photo: Courtesy of www.heatherhuey.com

Get The Look: Laid-Back Jac

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What’s not to like about Jac Jagaciak? The Polish runway vet has certainly become a familiar face, even to those who don’t follow models. At the Style.com office, we have loved her since her start in 2009 (she was only 15!). Aside from her killer good looks, she’s always had a signature nonchalant aesthetic that keeps the street-style photographers on their toes. For example, one of her recent looks snapped in Paris included black skinny jeans, suede sneakers, a two-toned boyfriend blazer, and a classic Chanel bag. The getup and the laid-back hair speak to Jac’s down-to-earth nature, which make us even bigger fans. Re-create her look with the essentials from Acne, Isabel Marant, and more, below.


From top left:

1. Rebecca Minkoff blazer, $378, available at www.rebeccaminkoff.com

2. Acne jean, $263.51, available at www.barneys.com

3. Isabel Marant sneaker, $640, available at www.lagarconne.com

4. Marc Jacobs bag, $575, available at www.neimanmarcus.com

Photo: Stockholm Street Style