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July 29 2014

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12 posts tagged "Adam Lippes"

ADAM, Elizabeth Street’s Newest Resident

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“I want our stores to be a real environment where you can hang out, like a house,” says designer Adam Lippes, who opens his newest boutique today in Nolita. “Elizabeth Street is so beautiful and vibrant; it’s a place people like to go and have brunch.”

Brunchers will now be able to pick up Lippes’ namesake collection, as well as his collaborations with the jewelry label Lulu Frost and the handbag line he’s set to launch, which will be hanging on the racks at the new 1,008-square-foot space at 211 Elizabeth Street. Lippes included the same design elements from his Hudson Street store, like a hand-picked selection of antiques, photos (mostly from Lippes’ personal collection), and books, to create a similar cozy atmosphere in his second Manhattan outpost. On Thursday, the designer, Annabelle Dexter-Jones, and filmmaker Tracy Antonopoulos will all be on hand to celebrate the official opening of the store with a Fashion’s Night Out bash. As for his next shop, the downtown designer is looking to make the move uptown.

Photos: John Aquino

Intrepid Explorers

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For the crowd sitting front-row at the Jeffrey Fashion Cares runway show last night, something seemed not quite right. It wasn’t the event (the annual fundraiser for AIDS charities) or the venue (the U.S.S. Intrepid battleship). It was just that, with Jason Wu (left, with JFC founder and Jeffrey New York owner Jeffrey Kalinsky), Joseph Altuzarra, Crystal Renn, and Hanne Gabby Odiele all in attendance, the backstage had come out front. Altuzarra articulated the sentiment for everyone. “It’s weird to be sitting at the show and not doing one,” he said. “Is this what it feels like?”

Yes and no was the answer. Sure, there was the runway and the stylish crowd, but the casting skewed toward the nontraditional. “Males in Speedos, I heard?” Sky Ferreira posited before the show. “Hey, I hope so—that’s why I’m here,” Odiele joked.

They were not disappointed. After hosts Nate Berkus and Tash Perrin of Christie’s rallied the crowd to empty their pockets (to add to the $4 million dollars that Jeffrey Fashion Cares has already raised) for the live auction items, such as trips to Switzerland and Paris fashion week, a handsome group of male models, in tiny swimsuits accessorized by the occasional pair of Lanvin shorts or Gucci sunglasses, began strutting the runway to the sound of Britney Spears. Loving every minute of her night off from the runway, Odiele yelped and offered high-fives to her friends as they swaggered past her. “I have never actually seen a male runway show before,” Renn added afterward. “It was definitely a change.”

It was an evening of firsts all around—many guests had never visited the Intrepid. “I haven’t been here, ever, and I love that one airplane with the folded wings,” said Adam Lippes. But even in new surroundings, tastes stay the same. “But I was also interested in the Hermès suede coat.”

Photo: D Dipasupil / FilmMagic

Adam Lippes, Patron Of The Arts

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On the terrace of his West Village penthouse last night, designer Adam Lippes was wearing a white V-neck. Hey, it’s his place, he can wear what he wants—especially if it helps highlight the series of artist T-shirts he just did for the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Lippes collaborated with four of the Whitney’s Biennal artists—Matthew Brannon, Phoebe Washburn, Ellen Harvey, and E.V. Day, the last of whom stretched a fishnet stocking diagonally across the front of her T-shirt and sprayed it stencil-style with red paint—on two designs for men and two for women, and made a thousand of each; the shirts go on sale (for 36 hours) tomorrow at Gilt Groupe, which teamed up with Lippes last night to throw a laid-back launch party. A chunk of the profits will benefit the museum.

Made in L.A. and hand-numbered in New York, the shirts have a bicoastal pedigree. The idea is that they be as contemporary as the institution they benefit, Lippes said. “The Whitney as a museum is pretty progressive,” he pointed out. “You know, they were the first major institution to collect living artists instead of dead artists—who would have thought?”

Photo: Chance Yeh/Patrick McMullan

Blasblog: Flower Power

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As he himself will tell you, when Carlos Mota put together his first book, Flowers: Chic & Cheap, he was hoping that some of his decoration-loving friends would be willing to host a few fêtes for the tome. Well, he got what he asked for: Since the tome came out in May, Mota has done parties uptown and downtown and even across the ocean. “In the end, I think I’ll be promoting this thing for longer than it took me to put it together,” he joked. “Not that I’m complaining. You know me: I love a good party.” And apparently, a good party loves him. Last night, John Demsey (pictured, left, with Mota) hosted a sit-down dinner for Mota in his Upper East Side town house, bringing the likes of Marjorie Gubelmann, Stefano Tonchi, Cynthia Rowley, Anne McNally, Rachel Roy, Adam Lippes, and Cornelia Guest. Dinner was served at three tables on the second floor, with each seat bearing its own personalized arrangement. Many people, including Tonchi, mistook them for artificial. “But he does amazing fake arrangements,” W‘s new editor in chief protested. This one, at least, was more chic than cheap.

Photo: Dimitrios Kambouris

The Style World’s Art Buyers On Their Whitney Acquisitions

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Tomorrow night, the Whitney throws its annual Art Party, presented by the BCBG Max Azria Group, where, beneath the air-kisses, clinking glasses, and sartorial appreciation, a good cause lurks: the museum’s Independent Study program, the beneficiary of the evening’s silent auction. Artists from Cecily Brown to Lawrence Weiner have donated works this year, and if past years are any indication, they should go fast. Style.com checked in with a few past buyers to find out what they snapped up and what they’re hoping to grab this year.

Adam Lippes
Designer, ADAM

Lippes (above right), who’s on the host committee of the event this year, came away last time with one of Rachel Owens’ glass-shard pieces (above left). “I’ve been a fan of her work for a long time,” Lippes told Style.com. “This is very strong and powerful, especially in this animal head shape.” (We’re not sure we see it, but art is in the eye of the beholder.) But powerful is right—with its jagged glass, we wondered if hanging the work at home posed a problem. “Actually, I’m afraid to touch it!” the designer said with a laugh. “I am hiring someone to hang it so I don’t sustain serious injuries.” Continue Reading “The Style World’s Art Buyers On Their Whitney Acquisitions” »