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7 posts tagged "Adrian Joffe"

DSM Brings Moynat to the Big Apple

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DSM Bags

There’s much to be said for the luxury of the discreet, something Moynat has in spades. Sans screaming logos, and even sans advertisements, the Parisian luggage label has made its name on the weight of an impressive heritage. Now, after more than a century and a half, the brand will make its first foray into the stateside market, with a temporary ground-floor boutique in New York’s Dover Street Market. The space opens tomorrow.

Since its inception in 1849, Moynat has enjoyed a storied history as a malletier alongside counterparts Goyard and Vuitton, outfitting Europe’s upper echelons with bespoke trunks. Long before Mulberry’s Alexa, Marc’s Stam, or even the Birkin, there was Moynat’s Réjane, a handbag en homage to celebrated Belle Epoque actress Gabrielle Réjane. But by the latter half of the 20th century, the tide had turned. The grande dame Parisian boutique shuttered in the mid-seventies and Moynat languished more or less in obscurity until being acquired by LVMH in 2010. Since then, CEO Guillaume Davin and artistic director Ramesh Nair have been tasked with reacquainting the world with the house’s former glory. First up was a 2,150-square-foot flagship at 348 Rue Saint-Honoré, which bowed in 2011. Nair has paid particular attention to a sense of joie de vivre, whipping up a sumptuous valise specifically to house the macarons of Pierre Hermé and an opulent, bicycle-mounted picnic case for those who would take their lunch alongside the Seine. A first international boutique opened its doors in London just a month ago, and tomorrow, Midtown East.

DSM

Le Moynat Trunk Show (a tribute to the brand’s historic “caravan” approach to presenting their wares abroad) has made stops previously at the Galeries Lafayette in Paris and Isetan Shinjuku in Tokyo. Along with a bevy of other goods, the Dover Street installment will feature two one-off, hand-painted Quattro bags inspired by New York. “We wanted to blend into [the space] and at the same time tell a story, because for us the most important element in debuting in New York is to share a bit of our history and show our values,” Davin says. Happily, Comme des Garçons CEO Adrian Joffe and his team have endeavored to make that as liberating an experience as possible. “We give them a space and a few health and safety rules, and then leave them complete freedom to do what they want. We urge them to be creative and to be freer than they would be normally. We encourage them to ignore corporate constraints where possible.”

While the pairing of famously cutting-edge DSM and a historic brand unfazed by trend or the passage of time may seem incongruous at first glance, Joffe is quick to dismiss any naysaying. “The juxtaposition of heritage and strong fashion is a very important part of Dover Street Market, just as is the clashing of luxury and streetwear, the iconic and the iconoclastic, the simple and the more complicated—all go toward the aim of an exciting shopping experience through the realization of beautiful chaos. Creative, visionary people do not need borders and boundaries and categorization.”

Le Moynat Trunk Show will be open at Dover Street Market New York, located at 160 Lexington Avenue, from April 24 to June 22.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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Marc by Marc Jacobs

RODARTE
Breakfast with my colleague Maya to go over the lineup for the next issue of Style.com/Print, which we put together while simultaneously covering the shows on the site and publish within a month of the close of Paris fashion week, a live-broadcast approach to making a magazine. Then it was off to the Rodarte show. Last season’s collection got slated, though I sort of liked its trashy energy. This one had more of the Mulleavy sisters’ customary handcrafted offbeat charm and should be a hit with their fans. After that it was on to Diesel Black Gold on the West Side, and then a meeting on the East Side with a European luxury house, who filled me in on its plans for a huge event later this spring.

MBMJ
Tons of energy and lots of food for thought at Marc by Marc Jacobs, which has been rechristened by its initials and is now in the hands of the London-based duo of Luella Bartley and Katie Hillier. Something about the scale of the plywood set and the refracted references here made me think I could have been at a show in Paris. There was an intriguing magpie quality to the clothes, as if you were moving through the racks of Dover Street Market from the Japanese designer section to the sophisticated European section to the streetwear section. My favorite grouping was the BMX-inspired looks. The show was a bona fide smash with the audience. It’ll be interesting to see how the aesthetic, a break from the line’s more insouciant past, plays at retail. Delphine Arnault, of the parent group LVMH, was looking on from the front row.

ANDRE WALKER
Talking of Dover Street Market, I ran into the new Comme des Garçons-operated, multiretailer space on Lexington Avenue to say hello to Andre Walker. Walker is the first to describe himself as an “elusive” designer, and after a few stops and starts, he’s back with a small line, thanks to the encouragement of DSM’s Adrian Joffe and Rei Kawakubo. You’ll find it on the seventh floor between Junya Watanabe and Prada, an indication of the esteem Kawakubo has for Walker.

NARCISO RODRIGUEZ
Every season, there are a couple of models who break through and start popping up in all the big shows so that you can trace the day’s development through their changing hairstyles and runway attitudes. This season, those models are Binx Walton and Anna Ewers, who in the space of a few hours went from Bolshevik ninja at MBMJ to sleek gallerina at the serenely beautiful Narciso Rodriguez show that closed another day of New York fashion week.

Photo: Getty Images 

Exclusive: LVMH Reveals the Forty Heavy Hitters on Its LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers Experts Panel

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LVMH Panel of Experts

Back in November, we broke the news that LVMH was launching its new 300,000-euro LVMH Prize for Young Designers. After applications close on February 2, an LVMH team will select thirty promising talents from the long list of hopefuls. And during Paris fashion week, those up-and-comers will present their collections to an esteemed panel of forty industry insiders. Today, we can reveal the heavy hitters who will be sitting in the judges’ seats, and boy, if the fact that 300K is on the line doesn’t give the contestants butterflies, the international powerhouses set to survey their work just might. Central Saint Martins’ Louise Wilson, stylist Olivier Rizzo, Net-a-Porter’s Natalie Massenet, stylist Camilla Nickerson, Colette’s Sarah Andelman, Dover Street Market’s Adrian Joffe, and editor Katie Grand are just some of the experts in the group. Of course, we can’t leave out Style.com’s own Tim Blanks and Jo-Ann Furniss, who will be joining their peers in narrowing down the pool from thirty to ten designers. As for the ultimate winner, we’ll have to hold our breath until May, when a group including Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Humberto Leon, Carol Lim, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, as well as Delphine Arnault, Jean-Paul Claverie, and Pierre-Yves Roussel decide who wins the grand prize. But considering the knowledge and taste levels the members of LVMH’s panel boast, it’s going to be worth the wait. Take a look at the full list of judges, below. As for the ultimate winner, we’ll have to hold our breath…

LVMH’s Panel of Experts
Imran Amed, founder and editor of Business of Fashion (London)
Sarah Andelman, creative director of Colette (Paris)
Fabien Baron, art director, founder of Baron & Baron (New York)
Tim Blanks, editor at large, Style.com (London)
Mariacarla Boscono, supermodel and muse (Rome)
Angelica Cheung, editor in chief of Vogue China (Beijing)
Alexandre de Betak, founder of Bureau Betak (Paris)
Godfrey Deeny, editor at large, fashion, Le Figaro (Paris)
Patrick Demarchelier, photographer (New York)
Babeth Djian, editor in chief of Numéro (Paris)
Linda Fargo, senior vice president of Bergdorf Goodman (New York)
Jo-Ann Furniss, writer, editor, and creative director (London)
Chantal Gaemperlé, LVMH group executive vice president for human resources and synergies (Paris)
Stephen Gan, founder of Fashion Media Group LLC (New York)
Julie Gilhart, consultant (New York)
Katie Grand, editor in chief of Love magazine (London)
Jefferson Hack, co-founder and editorial director of Dazed Group (London)
Laure Hériard Dubreuil, co-founder and chief executive of The Webster (Miami)
Adrian Joffe, chief executive officer of Dover Street Market International (London)
Sylvia Jorif, journalist at Elle magazine (Paris)
Hirofumi Kurino, creative Director of United Arrows (Tokyo)
Linda Loppa, director of Polimoda (Florence)
Natalie Massenet, founder and executive chairman of Net-a-Porter (London)
Pat McGrath, makeup artist (New York)
Marigay McKee, president of Saks Fifth Avenue (New York)
Sarah Mower, contributing editor, American Vogue (London)
Camilla Nickerson, stylist (New York)
Lilian Pacce, fashion editor and writer (São Paulo)
Jean-Jacques Picart, fashion and luxury consultant (Paris)
Gaia Repossi, creative director of Repossi (Paris)
Olivier Rizzo, stylist (Antwerp)
Carine Roitfeld, Founder of CR Fashion Book (Paris)
Olivier Saillard, director of the Galliera Museum (Paris)
Marie-Amelie Sauvé, stylist (Paris)
Carla Sozzani, founder of 10 Corso Como (Milan)
Charlotte Stockdale, stylist (London)
Tomoki Sukezane, stylist (Tokyo)
Natalia Vodianova, supermodel and philanthropist (Paris)
Louise Wilson, course director of the Fashion M.A. at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (London)
Dasha Zhukova, editor in chief of Garage magazine and founder of Garage Museum of Contemporary Art (Moscow)

Photo: Courtesy Photo

World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore

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The many different edifices—many designed by Rei Kawakubo—of Dover Street Market New YorkTomorrow, Dover Street Market in New York opens its doors to the public (including that very committed member of the public who has been camped out in a pup tent on the corner, reportedly for days, waiting). The multibrand store, owned by Comme des Garçons, stocks both the full range of Comme des Garçons labels (which are many), and lines that Rei Kawakubo and her team select and buy for the store—with the sphinx-like Kawakubo often doing the buys herself.

The concept of shop-in-shops at multibrand retailers is nothing new, and many department stores have concessions piloted by individual designers and labels. But few give so much freedom to so many as Dover Street Market. (“We don’t go in for brainstorming,” CdG CEO Adrian Joffe put it dryly to Style.com last year) The result is that walking through the seven stories of New York’s Dover Street Market—or riding up in the glass elevator that was commissioned for the space—is a varied, eye-popping, and often surreal experience. Brands are grouped together in unlikely arrangements, decided by Kawakubo. On the seventh floor, Prada sits next to the skate brand Supreme, the Japanese line Visvim, and near André Walker, the cult designer coaxed out of semi-retirement to design a new collection for the store. And because most if not all of the labels are given license to design their own spaces and fixtures, going from one to the next, even over a distance of only a few feet, can feel like traveling between dimensions or falling down the proverbial rabbit hole. (This is not even to take into account the stairway, designed by the architects Arakawa and Gins, which somewhat resembles a birth canal and is reputed, according to a Comme representative, “to reverse your destiny.”) And this is before you account for the artworks commissioned from the space, including three artist-designed pillars that evolve as they cut through the seven floors, a sound art installation, a mural and more.

The result is a store that is completely unlike all of the existing shopping experiences in New York. But for every person disoriented by the experience, there is likely to be another delighted by the creative chaos. “It’s not overthought. I feel sometime shopping environments can be overcalculated—it’s nearly forced, duty-free luxury,” said Jonathan Anderson, who created the first branded space he’s ever done in the history of his J.W. Anderson label for the store. “I don’t think luxury has to be determined in that way. I think luxury is about the arrangement of ideas, not necessarily the finish.”

Style.com spoke with several designers who created their own spaces—and in many cases, exclusive product—for Dover Street Market New York.

Dover Street Market New York opens tomorrow at 160 Lexington Avenue, NYC.

J.W. Anderson

J.W. Anderson's space at Dover Street Market New YorkAnderson, the London-based designer who was recently named creative director of Loewe, was inspired to build his space out of children’s foam-rubber play blocks, all in a shade somewhere between sky and Yves Klein blue. He’d seen children playing with them in a park in Venice, where he’d just returned from his first vacation in seven years when Joffe asked him to do a space on DSMNY’s fifth floor. “They’re from America, weirdly,” he said. “The company did them exclusively in different shapes for us. It was quite fun, actually.”

Dover Street has been a longtime patron of Anderson’s collections, which are also stocked in its London and Ginza, Tokyo, stores. Kawakubo herself selects the pieces to carry which often, thanks to her off-kilter eye, end up being exclusive to DSM. “I always like watching her edit. I love her commitment to fashion, buying from other brands. You have to be on a very different plane to able to do that,” he said. “I think that’s what’s so exciting about the relationship between Dover Street and Comme des Garçons. I think it’s such an interesting exercise, and that’s why there’s no compromise in the buy, there’s no compromise in the store shopping experience.”

Supreme

The Supreme space at Dover Street Market New York

“Supreme is a hard brand for people to categorize,” said founder James Jebbia. “DSM does a great job at taking the best brands in the world and mixing them in their store without categorizing them.”

All that is to say, Dover Street let Supreme be Supreme: graphic, in your face and immediate. Jebbia commissioned Weirdo Dave (né Dave Sandey, but also known as Fuck This Life) to create a large backdrop mural of found images, which has a Tumblr-ish spark. (A few yards away hangs Visvim’s cozy hanging quilts.) How much interaction did Kawakubo have with the space? “Not much, really,” Jebbia said. “Rei let us design the space how we wanted, but she looks at and approves every detail. If she didn’t like something, she certainly would have told us.”

Continue Reading “World of Interiors: Dover Street Market New York’s Designers on the Spaces They Designed for the New York Megastore” »

A Very DSM December

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Dover Street Market New YorkIt’s coming…. Last year, it was announced that Rei Kawakubo’s conceptual shopping wonderland, Dover Street Market, which already has locations in London and Tokyo, would be opening its doors in New York. But we didn’t know exactly when the Manhattan mecca would launch, until today. This afternoon, DSM revealed that the store, located on the fittingly unlikely corner of Thirtieth Street and Lexington Avenue, will bow on December 21. What treasures will be on offer, you ask? Prada, Thom Browne, Supreme, Simone Rocha, Christopher Kane, Alaïa, Atto, A.P.C., Rick Owens, Junya Watanabe, and a brand-new range from nineties fashion star Andre Walker are just some of the lines on DSM New York’s stock list. And don’t worry—wares from every breed of Comme des Garçons you could possibly dream of will be up for sale, too. Whether DSM will be able to transform the notoriously bland Murray Hill neighborhood into something with a little more elegance and edge is up for debate, but if anyone can do it, it’s Rei Kawakubo. For more information on DSM’s stateside arrival, read our Q&A with Comme des Garçons CEO Adrian Joffe.

Photo: Courtesy of Dover Street Market