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26 posts tagged "Alberta Ferretti"

Jonathan Saunders Wins BFC/ Designer Fashion Fund, CDG Rolls Out Another Beatles Collection, Alberta Ferretti X Macy’s, And More…

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Jonathan Saunders is this year’s winner of the prestigious BFC/Vogue Designer Fashion Fund. Saunders will receive a cool £200,000 prize along with a personalized business mentoring program. Saunders beat out the likes of Peter Pilotto, Mary Katrantzou, and Richard Nicoll for the award. [Vogue U.K.]

The sporadic but well-received Comme des Garçons by the Beatles collection will return for another installment later this month. On February 17, CDG stores and Dover Street Market will release the merchandise—a green apple-printed backpack and two tartan shirts. Prices range from $395 to $860. [Hint]

Actress and musician Charlotte Gainsbourg sat down with Nownesss to discuss her forthcoming album, Stage Whispers. Gainsbourg describes her creative process, growing up as the child of Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin, and being the muse of Balenciaga’s Nicolas Ghesquière. [Nowness]

Alberta Ferretti will be the next designer to create a collection for Macy’s contemporary Impulse department. Available April 17, the line is inspired by the Amalfi Coast and will consist of “light summer clothing that evokes the spirit of my beautiful country,” Ferretti tells WWD. The collection of about 30 pieces will range from $49 to $119. [WWD]

Photo: Alessandro Viero / GoRunway.com

Who’s In Who For Tomorrow’s Royal Wedding, Why The Supes Are Super, And More…

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You know, I know, and given the media saturation, even extraterrestrial life probably knows: Tomorrow’s the Royal Wedding. But who’s wearing what? Details are starting to trickle in: David Beckham will be in Ralph Lauren; Princesses Tatiana of Greece and Denmark and Matilde of Belgium in Armani Privé; Anya Hindmarch in Emilia Wickstead; and Prince Harry’s date (and on-again/off-again girlfriend) Chelsy Davy will wear two custom-made dresses by Alberta Ferretti (a sketch, left). [Vogue U.K.]

And the princess-to-be? London bookies are probably cursing right now: The front-runner for Kate’s dress, Bruce Oldfield, has come forward to confess that he’s not doing the honors. So who will Cinderella’s fairy god-tailor be? [WWD]

The IHT‘s Jessica Michault considers the continued reign of the early-nineties supe, like Kate, Naomi, and Christy, and wonders what it takes to stay on the runway. [Jessica Michault]

And Jessica Alba is the new face of Piaget. The timeless beauty jokes write themselves! [Racked]

Photo: Courtesy of Alberta Ferretti

Alberta Ferretti Talks Working With Emma Watson

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Emma Watson—when she’s not busy making Harry Potter flicks, creating mini Internet firestorms by cutting her hair into a Mia Farrow crop, speaking as the face of Lancôme, or attending Brown University—is also a committed environmentalist. After working with People Tree, the English fair-trade fashion company, on a collection for several seasons, Watson branched to debut Pure Threads with designer Alberta Ferretti. (Part of the proceeds from Pure Threads will also benefit People Tree.) The five-piece capsule collection, Ferretti says, is “like a mini wardrobe,” one that consists of two lace dresses, a cotton skirt, a muslin long-sleeved shirt, and a pair of embroidered denim shorts, all made according to principles of eco-friendliness and sustainability. The Pure Threads collection (below) is now on sale at AlbertaFerretti.com. Below, Mrs. Ferretti spoke with Style.com on Watson’s sophisticated style, their collaboration, and her own long-standing environmentalism.

How did you come to work with Emma Watson?
Emma and I have a long relationship that dates back to when I dressed her for the promotion of her first Harry Potter film. Since then, we have been in touch and I was very struck by her collaboration with People Tree. I think she is very serious, intelligent, and extremely talented. She was an obvious choice for me on this project as we share a deep sensibility for the green cause.

How would you describe her style? How did it gel with your own aesthetic?
Emma is a fresh, serene, and intelligent young woman who has a very sophisticated style. She is a young woman who lives life to the full: She is dedicated professionally, involved socially, and is intriguing and cool. We both wanted the collection to be easy to wear and accessible to a wide range of the public. The main inspiration that came directly from Emma was the Jane Birkin mood, typical of London in the late 1970′s, which came when she saw [my] Spring ’11 collection. However, the collection shows the unmistakable feminine and romantic style of Alberta Ferretti. The two came together in the shared concept of feminine style.

Has ecological fashion been a long-term goal of yours?
Concerns with the environment have always been important to me, and over the years I have been involved in a number of projects. I was born near the sea, I live surrounded by nature, and I am particularly close to the environment and sensitive to ecological problems. The event that made me really think was the Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster off the American coast last year. As a designer I felt it was important for me to create a line of clothing that would demonstrate my commitment to eco-friendly principles. The materials used for this collection are entirely organic, and every process is environmentally friendly, from the growing of the cotton down to the dyeing of the fabrics.

Photos: Courtesy of Alberta Ferretti

The Pitti Preview

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Raffaello Napoleone, Pitti Immagine’s dapper CEO, convened a group of editors and trade officials—many chattering away in Italian—at Quattro in New York City for a briefing on the upcoming Pitti Uomo and Pitti W fairs. It was a whirlwind visit (Napoleone and company headed for the airport while most were still sipping espresso), but the news was all good. As has been announced, Gareth Pugh (left) will be the invited guest, presenting his new womenswear collection in Florence in January. (Via video message, he expressed his gratitude; Pitti’s special events director hinted that he’d be showing in an unlikely location—one that had never hosted a fashion show before.) Trussardi will be the invited guest for men’s, but the company has plans that go far beyond fashion. In the Stazione Leopalda in the heart of Florence, the label will not only host its fashion show, but also present an exhibition called 8 ½, one that will include contemporary artworks by Maurizio Catellan, Paul McCarthy, and Tino Sehgal. (There’ll even be a house made of bread, courtesy of Swiss conceptual artist Urs Fischer.) And Alberta Ferretti will kick off the event with a special collection presented, she said, “for women everywhere.”

The Florentine trade fair, which runs from January 11 to 14, will also play host to a variety of intriguing launches: a new archival project London-based designer Aitor Throup is undertaking with Umbro; a capsule collection celebrating the centennial of the Italian suit line Lubiam; and a new project from Adam Kimmel, who took his turn as Pitti’s invited menswear guest two years ago.

Photo: Courtesy of Pitti Immagine

Behind-The-Scenesters: Mary Howard

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Designers design. Photographers photograph. Models model. That much—in broad strokes, at least—is clear. But what about the artists, technicians, and industry insiders, often unpublicized and underappreciated, who help to get clothes and accessories made and shown? Call them Behind-the-Scenesters: people who shape our experience of fashion but never take a bow on the catwalk or strike a pose for the camera. Without them—from pattern-makers to production designers—the show wouldn’t go on. And in a new series, Style.com sits down with a few of these pros to find out, basically, what they do.

Mary Howard is the set designer on virtually every key fashion photographer’s speed dial. She’s the consummate background professional, literally—she creates the mise-en-scène of a shoot. Howard (left works regularly with Steven Meisel, Annie Leibovitz, and Steven Klein, among others, and her sets range as widely as her collaborators’ styles. She does dazzlingly elaborate (Leibovitz’s 2008 Wizard of Oz shoot starring Keira Knightley), and she can make a set virtually invisible, too (Meisel’s Spring ’10 Prada campaign.) On any given day, you can find Howard mottling the gray backdrop at a studio shoot or packing up a selection of Art Deco lamps headed off on location. Here, she talks to Style.com about working with the masters, how much stuff is too much stuff, and learning when to leave the bobby pins in.

So, Mary: In one sentence, what do you do?
I call myself a set designer for print. Could be editorial, could be ads. In movies, they call someone like me a production designer; in fashion, the name “set designer” has stuck but it doesn’t entirely describe the job. There’s a lot of art direction involved; it’s not just about picking out a rug. But I guess if I have to boil down my job description to one sentence, I’d say—I create the world around the girl. I don’t have anything to do with the model, but I shape the physical environment that surrounds her and help the photographer and the stylist and everyone else involved with the shoot tell the right story and make the girl pop.

Why do you think the fashion industry has shied away from the title “production designer”?
I think some of it has to do with the fact that this is still an emerging field. It barely existed when I moved to New York; it wasn’t until recently that my studio even began getting credits in magazine. I work quite a bit with Grace Coddington at Vogue, and she’ll tell stories about sending her assistants out to just, you know, grab a chair. Or the photographer would send his assistant out to pick up props.

How did you get into set design?
I grew up in New Orleans, and after I got my MFA, I went back down there to build Mardi Gras floats. Then I came to New York City and built floats for the Macy’s parade. I was always making things—I’d make props for Saturday Night Live, for instance. Eventually I began working with a set designer—this was about 20 years ago, and it’s possible that she was the only one. We began working with Richard Avedon, and that led to other photographers and editors seeking us out. Then I went out on my own. Honestly, I feel like a grandma in this field.

What’s an average workday like for you?
I think that, like a lot of people in fashion, I do what I do because there isn’t really “an average day.” There are days on set, and there are prep days that involve a lot of thinking or researching or pounding the pavement looking at stuff. So there’s a routine, but the work itself is so dependent on the assignment—if I’m working with Annie, her process is totally different from, say, Steven Meisel’s process. Continue Reading “Behind-The-Scenesters: Mary Howard” »