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August 20 2014

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22 posts tagged "Andre Saraiva"

Impossible Concerts, Courtesy of Maison Kitsuné and Mr. André

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Andre Saraiva  x Maison Kitsune's Dream Concert Posters

Since launching Maison Kitsuné while on tour with Daft Punk in 2002, onetime band manager Gildas Loaec and architect Masaya Kuroki have never strayed far from their dream of bridging the gap between the Parisian fashion and music worlds. And their newest project falls right in line with that mission. Dubbed Dream Concerts Art Show, the pair’s latest effort is a collaborative exhibition with longtime friend André Saraiva, which will open at their concept store in Tokyo on September 4.

“I’m very close with André—we spend a lot of time together—and when we discovered that he was willing to explore an exhibition, we came up with the concept of concert lineups for an incredible evening,” explained Loaec, who first met the famed graffiti artist-cum-garçon-about-town more than fifteen years ago when he moved to Paris. The exhibit features a host of Saraiva-scribed posters showcasing the globetrotter’s fantasy concerts: “An amazing hip-hop concert, the best French electro lineup—dream shows,” commented Saraiva by phone from Los Angeles. Continue Reading “Impossible Concerts, Courtesy of Maison Kitsuné and Mr. André” »

Pledging Allegiance to Kenzo

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Carol Lim. Maurizio Cattelan, Pierpaolo Ferrari, Micol Talso and Humberto Leon at the Kenzo party

Leave it to Kenzo designers and Opening Ceremony founders Humberto Leon and Carol Lim to host a full-on Fourth of July BBQ a Paris. On Thursday, the pair invited guests such as André Saraiva, Rose McGowan, Sarah Andelman, Ellen von Unwerth, and Léa Seydoux to the Jardin d’Acclimatation, where they got their fix of hamburgers, hot dogs, fries, and nineties jams. The occasion (other than an Independence Day celebration for the visiting Américains) was the unveiling of Kenzo’s Fall ’13 campaign. This season, the designers teamed up with Toilet Paper magazine founders (and the evening’s cohosts) Maurizio Cattelan, Pierpaolo Ferrari, and Micol Talso, to create their imagery. The surreal ads (below) star Leon and Lim pals Rinko Kikuchi and Sean O’Pry, who pose among a cast of giant insects, gangs of mice, bananas, kittens hiding in boots, the Fall collection’s eye motif, and Cattelan’s favorite—the tiger dog.

Cattelan—an OC devotee—reported that he was pleasantly surprised when Leon and Lim called to collaborate, and described the shoot as a “creative laboratory.” In addition to appearing in Fall glossies, the ads will be featured in Kenzine—a limited-edition Toilet Paper-esque magazine—as well as on a capsule collection of sweatshirts and T-shirts, which will hit stores this September.

Continue Reading “Pledging Allegiance to Kenzo” »

Seven Suggestions For Improving Milan Fashion Week

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Gildo Zegna, Patrizio Bertelli, Cav. Mario Boselli, and Diego Della Valle during the Camera Nazionale Della Moda Italiana press conference in Milan

At 8 a.m. on Sunday morning, the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana held a press conference at which attendance had been all but mandated weeks in advance. The early, un-Italian hour was no doubt meant to indicate the seriousness of the occasion, as was a lineup of speakers that included Patrizio Bertelli, Diego Della Valle, and Gildo Zegna, all of whom have joined the organization’s new board. Essentially, these captains of one of Italy’s most important and cherished industries have banded together to reinvigorate Milan’s increasingly hidebound fashion weeks. “I’ve heard the word boring,” Zegna acknowledged, though he insisted that wasn’t the case. The speeches were heavy on sweeping statements and light on concrete details, which provoked the assembly of sleep-deprived journalists into a volley of probing questions. Bertelli had earlier compared his fellow board members to “senators of fashion,” and he might have been thinking, Et tu, Suzy? as the International New York Times‘ Suzy Menkes led a round of interrogation into everything from Milan’s inhospitality to young designers to its perceived shortcomings on the digital front. Bertelli is no pushover, and he gave as good as he got. When a French journalist asked why we were only hearing from old men (Angela Missoni was a mostly silent presence on the board today), the Prada CEO told him he’d be a dangerous old man himself if he didn’t change his attitude, and then unexpectedly pointed out that Italy was the first country to abolish slavery, in the 1300s. By the end, one attendee was muttering, “Business as usual,” but if the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem, then today’s announcement should be welcomed as a positive development. Certainly there is enough firepower and entrepreneurial know-how on this new board to solve world peace, let alone bring new energy to a fashion week. Zegna stressed that the process would be a dialogue and said suggestions would be encouraged. In that spirit, here are seven modest proposals for improving Milan fashion week.

1. Lure young, international designers to Milan.
Menkes wondered how Milan would be replacing Burberry and Alexander McQueen, two brands that have recently decamped back to their native London. But the city’s relatively uncrowded schedule could be one of its biggest assets. Given how ridiculously packed the New York and, increasingly, London and Paris schedules have become, you would think any number of hot young brands could be persuaded to believe that they’d have a better chance of standing out in Milan. If access to Italy’s unparalleled production expertise were thrown in as part of the deal, who could resist?

2. Take the show on the road.
The British Fashion Council and, to some extent, the U.S.-based CFDA have done a good job of promoting their designers abroad. As part of the London Showrooms events, a dozen young U.K. talents have even careened around Hong Kong together on a bus. While there are barely enough young Milan-based designers to fill a Smart car let alone a minibus, and its more established designers are already well known internationally, it shouldn’t be too hard to come up with the right kind of touring exhibition. Picture a mix of up-and-comers such as Umit Benan, Andrea Pompilio, and Fausto Puglisi; some cult brands like MP Massimo Piombo and Aspesi; and a couple of designer offshoots like Versace’s Versus line and Lapo Elkann’s highly covetable new made-to-measure collaboration with Gucci—all introduced by a charming, high-profile figure (yes, we’re talking to you, Lapo). That would go some way to showing the rest of the world the extent of Italy’s ambitions. Continue Reading “Seven Suggestions For Improving Milan Fashion Week” »

Mr. André’s Joyful Noise

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It’s hard to imagine downtown New York without the touch of graffiti-artist-turned-nightclub-impresario André Saraiva. He’s been in and out of the scene since the late nineties and is so deeply embedded in the city’s art-fashion nexus that his presence feels almost indelible. His latest project, a music video he directed for conceptual punk band TV Baby, is a visual love letter to the New York of his early days.

“The guys from TV Baby are some of my oldest friends, and first friends in New York,” Saraiva told Style.com. “I met them in a bar when they were in a band called A.R.E. Weapons, and they were the people who took care of me, who became my family.” A.R.E. Weapons—a former Beatrice Inn fixture—consisted of Paul Sevigny, Matthew McAuley, and Brain McPeck. Today, McAuley and McPeck make up TV Baby, the now 2-year-old band whose music is an ode to television and the pre-Internet era. “It’s loud, and if not confrontational, a little aggressive,” offered McAuley.

Titled “Wild Joy,” the music vid, Saraiva explains, is “a little love story that mixed my French side—where I have a bit of nouvelle vague—with Matt and Brain, who are really very New York.” Saraiva’s former flame, Annabelle Dexter-Jones, stars in the film, which was shot in the director’s Chinatown apartment. Debuting exclusively above, the short is a lighthearted look at some very long-lasting friendships.

McAuley and McPeck, however, suggest that “Wild Joy” has a dark side, too. “The song itself is a very reductionist view of life,” says McAuley, “It doesn’t really matter whether we like [the life we're living] or not, because this is all we have. Enjoy it if you want.”

Where’s Le Baron?

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Art Basel is upon us—the Miami Beach edition of this year’s fair begins next week—and the parties number in the triple digits each night. Sure to be a question at each: Where’s Le Baron? After five years of stationing their Basel pop-up at the Delano Hotel, André Saraiva and his Le Baron crew have decided to switch it up—five times. From December 4 through December 9, the now-mobile party spot will spend each night in a different locale. (The obvious joke about partygoers doing the same suggests itself here.) The details will be kept under wraps until dark—or, at least, 6 p.m.—when the addresses will be revealed via Twitter, Facebook, and the club’s new “Where’s Le Baron?” app (available for download at whereislebaron.com). “I thought it would be fun to make it a challenge to find Le Baron this year,” Saraiva told Style.com, noting that last year’s overcrowding and round-the-block lines were a factor in the decision. “I wanted to make it a space that our friends and family come to every night without the trouble of the usual crazy doors in the same spots.”

As a nightlife-purveyor-cum-graffiti-artist, Saraiva plans to embrace the Basel spirit by throwing a party with Richard Prince for his new AriZona iced tea, for which the artist branded cans with his Nurse and Joke paintings. (At $0.99 to $1.25, they’re bound to be the most cost-effective Princes at the fair.) Not to be outdone, Saraiva will unveil a public mural he’s created in Miami’s Design District. Naturally, his work will be feted with a Baron-style block party.