Style.com

August 23 2014

styledotcom Three questions for a powerhouse player in Brazil's fashion scene: stylem.ag/XEntdC pic.twitter.com/j36jpxEAvF

Subscribe to Style Magazine
3 posts tagged "Andrea Incontri"

Are Italian Up-and-Comers the Answer to Milan’s Sleepy Fashion Week?

-------

au jour le jour

Last June, the Camera Nazionale della Mode Italiana held a very serious press conference to address the very serious issue of Milan’s waning fashion week. Gildo Zegna told a room of journalists that he had heard MFW described as “boring.” That’s somewhat unsurprising, given the city’s lack of new energy and fresh perspective. The heavy hitters on hand vowed to make changes, and though the audience of international journalists was skeptical, there are some signs that the issues are being addressed. An early draft of the Spring ’15 MFW schedule has begun circulating, and it seems there’s been a bit of a designer shuffle. According to WWD, a strong focus has been put on Italy’s emerging talents. Stella Jean and Andrea Incontri, for instance, will show right before Gucci on September 17, and Au Jour Le Jour (above) and MSGM will show on September 21, the same day as Marni and Salvatore Ferragamo. Perhaps the thinking is that the press won’t skip the newbies if they’re sandwiched between the major houses—and the move matches up with Camera CEO Jane Reeve’s goal to help Italian up-and-comers build their businesses internationally. Giorgio Armani, too, has been a staunch supporter of youngsters, allowing one lucky designer to show in his Armani Teatro free of charge each season. (Angelos Bratis is his Spring ’15 pick.) It would be nice, as our editor in chief suggested last year, to see Milan drawing new designers from around the globe to MFW—that would really spice things up—but helping homegrown talents is a start.

Photos: Courtesy of Au Jour Le Jour

Andrea Incontri Tapped for Tod’s Menswear

-------

Andrea Incontri - Backstage - Milan Fashion Week Womenswear Autumn/Winter 2014Tod’s continues to amp up its ready-to-wear presence. Back in September, the leather goods company brought on Alessandra Facchinetti to design its women’s collections, and today it announced that Andrea Incontri has been hired as the label’s new creative director of menswear.

“Becoming part of a company like Tod’s is both an honor and an exciting challenge,” says Incontri. “Quality and contemporary Italian style are Tod’s values that are already part of my personal vision of the modern man. My aim is to develop them, always keeping in mind the importance of the roots of a brand with such a rich history and craftsmanship.”

Incontri has been showing his namesake men’s and women’s labels since Spring 2013, but will no doubt benefit from the global exposure of Tod’s. Incontri’s first collection for the house will be shown in Milan this Sunday, June 22.

Photo: Pier Marco Tacca / Getty Images

Quick to the Draw: A Moment With Richard Haines

-------

Richard HainesRichard Haines is somewhat of a fashion-week anomaly—he’s a 61-year-old illustrator with a blog. In a past life, he was a womenswear designer for some of America’s biggest brands, such as Calvin Klein, Bill Blass, Perry Ellis, and Puff Daddy, but he threw all that in to focus on art in the digital age. He quickly gained traction, getting hired by everyone from J.Crew to The New York Times for his ability to make guys look far cooler on paper than they do in real life (you can only imagine what he does for models at runway shows). And recently, he received the ultimate validation: a gig illustrating Prada’s menswear collections, the fruits of which were released in book and T-shirt form. Haines gave us a sneak peek at his Spring ’14 illustrations from Prada (below, left), Jil Sander (below, right), and Andrea Incontri (bottom), which debut exclusively here. And below, the talent talks about flying on private jets with Calvin Klein, life as a blogger, and that one time three days ago when Beppe Modenese mistook him for Bill Cunningham.

When did you first come to the shows and what’s changed since then?
Eighteen thirty-four [laughs]. I went to Paris fashion week in the early eighties, when I was designing, and a friend of mine, who was the editor of New York magazine, would take me to shows like Claude Montana and Thierry Mugler. It was this amazing moment in Paris. Back then I saw womenswear, now I see menswear, so the scale of the audience is different. The biggest thing [then] was this trend of sending out, like, eight models in the same outfit all at once. It was very dramatic, and that doesn’t seem to happen now. If anything, it’s gotten more intimate and more manageable. But the media has made fashion week very different, which is fascinating.

I’ve heard you say that people were dropping a lot more money back in those days.
Yeah, it was a different time. It was easier to be in the fashion business, because there weren’t these constant collections to do. The stakes weren’t as high, and people did it with a lot more money. Now, there are more brands competing for less money. A couple of years after I started going to the collections in Paris, I was working at Calvin Klein, and it was a privately owned company—it was his company—so if he wanted to charter a jet, he would. We’d go to London and then the fabric shows in Milan, and then we’d go to Lake Como and stay at the Villa d’Este. It wasn’t bad.

Richard Haines' sketches from Prada and Jil Sander

What’s it like being one of the only illustrators at the shows?
I love doing it. There’s something really exciting about sitting down and watching someone present and being able to draw it. I don’t think about whether I’m one of the only people doing this. I just love doing it, and it makes me happy. I just keep going.

What are your fashion-week essentials?
I inevitably always forget one thing. I have little cases where I carry charcoal pencils, Moleskine notebooks—which reminds me, I need to buy a new one today—a charger for my cell phone, antidepressants…. And that’s it. When I first started doing this, I would forget paper, and I started drawing on envelopes and show notes and people loved that, so sometimes it works to my advantage. Continue Reading “Quick to the Draw: A Moment With Richard Haines” »