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9 posts tagged "Andrea Lieberman"

Editor Obsessions: A.L.C.’s Leo Bucket Bag

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Every day, Style.com’s editors reveal their current obsessions—and where to buy them. Check out today’s pick, below.

A.L.C. Bucket bag

Over the years, I’ve accumulated a collection of purses so vast, it could fill a bellman’s luggage trolley. But the one item I’m still sorely lacking in my arsenal is a classic bucket bag. For some time now, I’ve been jonesing to get my hands on one of Mansur Gavriel’s popular, well-priced styles. But after seeing so many other girls carrying their MGs in recent months, I’m now coveting something a bit more anonymous: A.L.C.’s new Leo bucket, which I first spied designer Andrea Lieberman toting at a recent Resort appointment. It’s roomy enough to stash all my daily essentials—plus my notebooks, press releases, and even a spare pair of shoes. The convertible Leo (named after Lieberman’s son) features smooth leather and unassuming hardware, but the best part is it can be worn as either a hobo or a cross-body. Simple, practical, and guaranteed to break in beautifully.

A.L.C. Leo convertible bucket bag, $895, now available for preorder on barneys.com.

Photo: Via Barneys.com

Dressing for Fame: Stylist and A.L.C. Designer Andrea Lieberman on What Women Want

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andrea-liebermanIf celebrity status is conferred in red-carpet appearances, then no actress today can compete without the help of just the right stylist. As Kerry Washington once told Glamour after she noticeably upped the sartorial ante, “There were a couple of actresses whom I felt were having the upper hand careerwise—because they knew how to work that red carpet.” A carefully crafted collaboration between stylist and client, the perfect look can create an indelible impact on agents, casting directors, and those of us watching from the sidelines. Straight from the epicenter of all things celebrity, we’ve asked some of the industry’s top stylists to share their experiences and impressions from their perch above Tinseltown. With our Dressing for Fame series, we bring you an exclusive, insider look at everything it takes to create those iconic moments captured by a million photo flashes.

Andrea Lieberman is a rare breed of stylist. A success story at styling, no doubt (she put J.Lo on the map in that plunging Versace at the Grammys), Lieberman harnessed that success into A.L.C., her well-received contemporary collection that seems to set the standard of cool season after season. With one foot still delicately placed in the world of styling and one firmly planted in design, the stylist-slash-designer talks exclusively to Style.com about going through the Valentino archives, her friend Arianne Phillips, working with J.Lo, and more.

You’ve done a lot of work styling music artists. Is there anything about styling for music artists that you’ve found different from styling celebrities in general?
My background was always very much a music background. For me, I really enjoyed that collaborative effort and creating a whole image, like an art director. It was more about collaborating on their image and touring and costuming and just really creating a look to go along with the vibe of where the album was.

What compelled you to start designing?
I immersed myself at a young age growing up in New York in the world of fashion, whether it was internships to retail to helping out friends who were stylists. Arianne Phillips is a very dear friend and has always been a huge inspiration of mine. I remember when I met her when we were both young and hanging out in New York. She was one of the first people I knew who worked on music, so she was quite inspiring. In terms of when I made the decision, it was just organic for me, and it felt right at that time in my life. I had a great time styling for ten years, and it was time for me to start a family and shake things up.

Do you think your styling career has informed your design career and vice versa?
As a stylist, you understand women and their wardrobe needs. Whether it’s an artist or a more average person, how they take things from the runway and make it a reality is an interesting thing. That’s how people actually wear things, and I think that’s why there’s been so many street-style blogs. I understand the emotional connection of women getting dressed, what makes them feel good, and what they put on to say, “This makes me feel good, this is what makes me feel strong.” I think from dressing women who were not models, you understand this emotion.

You’re well known for certain looks that you dressed your clients in. Is there one that sticks out to you as your favorite red-carpet moment?
For me, there are quieter moments that might not have gotten attention like the other moments. I had access to the Valentino archives for the Oscars one year (when there was no red carpet) and dressed Jennifer Lopez in a beautiful mint green Valentino dress that [had been] worn by Jackie O. That was a majorly beautiful moment. And I worked with Fred Leighton, and we made these amazing maharaja-inspired earrings out of all platinum and diamonds.

Do you want to be remembered or regarded as a stylist or a designer? Or both?
I just want to be present. Obviously, both. Styling was a really important part of my journey, but maybe I’ll be remembered for the next thing that I do.

A.L.C. Kicks It With Clergerie

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ALC x Robert Clergerie

Fashion collaborations are a dime a dozen these days, but every once in a while, we come across one that just makes sense. The latest case in point is A.L.C. x Robert Clergerie. As a longtime fan of the renowned footwear brand (creatively helmed by current artistic director Roland Mouret), designer Andrea Lieberman jumped at the opportunity to join forces with Clergerie on a limited-edition style that complements her Spring ’14 collection. What does Lieberman look for in a great shoe? “The same thing I look for in my wardrobe: incredible versatility, comfort—knowing everything I have to do in a day—and a bit of unconventional edge,” she told Style.com. “The process was effortless. It was important for us to maintain the integrity of A.L.C.’s DNA and also Clergerie’s.” Gilles Assor, vice president of Robert Clergerie U.S., added, “We felt a genuine synergy from our first meetings.”

The result of the partnership is a pair of architectural wedge sandals, which debut exclusively here. The kicks are an updated version of Clergerie’s signature Danvin style, reimagined with a gray suede body and a platform, featuring textured white and black patent leather. Arriving in select Intermix stores across the country this weekend, the new shoes have us excited for the warmer months ahead. Are there more Clergerie collabs in A.L.C.’s future? “I feel like we’ve forged a great friendship,” said Lieberman. “That being said, I am a slave to the shoe department, and however it manifests itself in the future is all good by me.” After all, A.L.C. recently launched a handbag line, so a footwear line isn’t out of the question.

The A.L.C. x Robert Clergerie limited-edition sandals ($595) will be sold exclusively at four Intermix retailers: Robertson Boulevard, L.A.; Bal Harbour, Florida; Soho, NYC; and Madison Avenue, NYC.

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

Shorts on Parade

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Marc by Marc Jacobs' shorts, Amy Poehler, A.L.C.'s shorts

Red carpets and the perennial summer press stops, including Comic-Con, don’t cease because of the heat. Taking a cue from Resort ’14, stylists are getting creative with ways to temper the temps. “We dress our clients in shorts on the red carpet—in lieu of a short skirt—when we’re looking to achieve a smaller proportion on bottom to balance a more oversize top or jacket,” offered designers and stylists Emily Current and Meritt Elliott. Not unlike A.L.C.‘s Andrea Lieberman, who used a tailored button-down and structured wool coat to do just that in her Resort collection, Elizabeth Olsen made a stop in San Diego promoting Godzilla in black-and-white Balenciaga, offsetting a super-short—and slim—shorts hemline with additional volume on top.

Sticking with sport instead of Resort’s usual frocks, Marc Jacobs dressed up his Marc by Marc shorts by lowering their length and contrasting their ease with a tailored top. So too did Amy Poehler, at the New York premiere of Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine, who forwent the familiarity of a flirty designer dress for a seasonally appropriate shorts-and-button-down combo. The result was a cool, casual alternative to the standard summer uniform.

Photo: Courtesy Photos (Marc by Marc Jacobs and A.L.C.); Monica Schipper / FilmMagic (Amy Poehler)

Lucky In L.A.

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“Bloggers have changed the fashion industry.” So opined Lucky editor in chief Brandon Holley, and that’s the guiding wisdom behind her magazine’s FABB Fashion and Beauty Blogger conference. The third annual conference took place yesterday, but for the first time, Holley chose L.A. as its home. “There’s a really neat intersection between fashion, bloggers, and celebrity; L.A. is kind of the center,” she explained. Proving her point were the the panelists set to speak: L.A.-based bloggers including WhoWhatWear’s Katherine Power and HelloGiggles’ Sophia Rossi; online-savvy celebrities like Jessica Alba (pictured), Cat Deeley, and Elizabeth Banks; fashion businesspeople like J Brand’s Jeff Rudes; and Hollywood insiders such as Mad Men costume designer Janie Bryant and Easy A screenwriter Will Gluck.

How did the day’s speakers see the change that blogs have wrought? Celebrity stylist-turned-A.L.C. designer Andrea Lieberman suggested that they’ve brought the stars down-to-earth—and in so doing, made them relatable to millions. Casual shots of celebrities on their off-hours, tirelessly chronicled by celeb-focused blogs, have “as much of an impact on fashion and style and image as the red carpet does.”
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