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April 20 2014

styledotcom .@karolinakurkova, @emmyrossum, @ChloeGMoretz, and more in this week's red carpet report: stylem.ag/1i05QLU

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6 posts tagged "Andrea Pompilio"

From Anime to Zen, Tokyo Fashion Week Had It All

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Tokyo Fashion Week

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tokyo closed on Saturday, just as the cherry blossoms were starting to paint the town pink. The fashion found on Tokyo’s Fall ’14 runways seemed more “Japanese avant-garde” than ever, but perhaps not in the way one might think. While the Japanese in Paris tend to be severe and dark, the inclinations of Tokyo’s catwalks lean more to the kawaii street movements that come with bright colors and catchy hooks of POP. Issey Miyake-backed brand Né-net (above, left) showed apron dresses splashed with cute, big-eyed manga girls and coquettish eyeball motifs. Thai brand Sretsis (above, right) arguably did kawaii better than the Japanese, and turned out signature flowery baby-doll dresses. The label is a staple on the streets of Harajuku. Mikio Sakabe pushed his fringe “pop-otaku” (anime geek) aesthetic to the extreme by casting only male models for his feminine collection. The cult of otaku is flirting with fashion more than ever before.

Tokyo Fashion Week

Another area in which Tokyo excels is menswear. Factotum is just a few eccentric details shy of being the next (N)umber (N)ine, and designer Koji Udo’s sleek pajama-party collection is already a hit among the city’s top buyers. On the other end of the spectrum is 99%IS (above, left). Now in its sophomore season, the label is already a fan favorite of streetwear aficionados. The house collaborated with Mackintosh on a number of rubberized motorcycle jackets, which climaxed in postapocalyptic cacophony when teamed with black plaster masks and aggressive studding.

One of the strongest shows was by local sportswear brand Onitsuka Tiger, which teamed up with Italian designer Andrea Pompilio for its first ready-to-wear collection. In a palette of black, white, and orange, it was racer-inspired but filled out with tailored suits that reflected the modern Tokyo man to a T.

If this is causing sensory overload, clean your palette with Dressedundressed (above, right), whose study on precise minimalism would make nineties-era Calvin Klein cry with jealousy. The Fall ’14 collection was inspired by Zen rock gardens. The lineup’s soft lines brought the week some cool harmony.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Giorgio Armani Gives Julian Zigerli a Runway

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Julian ZigerliGiorgio Armani is dead set on reviving Milan fashion week. To contribute to its growth, the designer has started inviting emerging talents to present at his Teatro Armani show space. The first two up-and-comers awarded with a runway were Andrea Pompilio (menswear) and Stella Jean (womenswear), who showed their Spring ’14 ranges with Mr. Armani’s help. Today, the next rising star on his radar was announced: Swiss menswear designer Julian Zigerli. Having studied at the University of Art Berlin, Zigerli’s luxurious, sporty looks (think: a jacket merged with a backpack, relaxed silhouettes, and playful-yet-masculine prints) earned him the Swiss Design Prize in 2011 and also got him a spot in London’s Vauxhall Ones to Watch lineup in 2012. Zigerli will send his Fall ’14 collection down Armani’s catwalk on January 11.

Armani Gives Stella Jean a Chance

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A look from Stella Jean's Fall '13 collectionContinuing his effort to provide some much needed support to Italy’s up-and-coming designers, Giorgio Armani has announced today that he will invite emerging talent Stella Jean to show her Spring ’14 collection at Teatro Armani during Milan fashion week. “The new generation of Italian designers needs our support,” offered Mr. Armani. “It is for this reason that I continue to make my theater on Via Bergognone available to them.”

Armani began inviting young labels to present in his space during the Spring ’14 menswear season, asking Andrea Pompilio to be his first rising star. Jean—a native Roman with a Haitian background—often uses her Creole heritage as a point of reference for vibrant ready-to-wear. A former model, she earned second place in Alta Roma’s Who Is On Next competition in 2011.

Seven Suggestions For Improving Milan Fashion Week

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Gildo Zegna, Patrizio Bertelli, Cav. Mario Boselli, and Diego Della Valle during the Camera Nazionale Della Moda Italiana press conference in Milan

At 8 a.m. on Sunday morning, the Camera Nazionale della Moda Italiana held a press conference at which attendance had been all but mandated weeks in advance. The early, un-Italian hour was no doubt meant to indicate the seriousness of the occasion, as was a lineup of speakers that included Patrizio Bertelli, Diego Della Valle, and Gildo Zegna, all of whom have joined the organization’s new board. Essentially, these captains of one of Italy’s most important and cherished industries have banded together to reinvigorate Milan’s increasingly hidebound fashion weeks. “I’ve heard the word boring,” Zegna acknowledged, though he insisted that wasn’t the case. The speeches were heavy on sweeping statements and light on concrete details, which provoked the assembly of sleep-deprived journalists into a volley of probing questions. Bertelli had earlier compared his fellow board members to “senators of fashion,” and he might have been thinking, Et tu, Suzy? as the International New York Times‘ Suzy Menkes led a round of interrogation into everything from Milan’s inhospitality to young designers to its perceived shortcomings on the digital front. Bertelli is no pushover, and he gave as good as he got. When a French journalist asked why we were only hearing from old men (Angela Missoni was a mostly silent presence on the board today), the Prada CEO told him he’d be a dangerous old man himself if he didn’t change his attitude, and then unexpectedly pointed out that Italy was the first country to abolish slavery, in the 1300s. By the end, one attendee was muttering, “Business as usual,” but if the first step to recovery is admitting you have a problem, then today’s announcement should be welcomed as a positive development. Certainly there is enough firepower and entrepreneurial know-how on this new board to solve world peace, let alone bring new energy to a fashion week. Zegna stressed that the process would be a dialogue and said suggestions would be encouraged. In that spirit, here are seven modest proposals for improving Milan fashion week.

1. Lure young, international designers to Milan.
Menkes wondered how Milan would be replacing Burberry and Alexander McQueen, two brands that have recently decamped back to their native London. But the city’s relatively uncrowded schedule could be one of its biggest assets. Given how ridiculously packed the New York and, increasingly, London and Paris schedules have become, you would think any number of hot young brands could be persuaded to believe that they’d have a better chance of standing out in Milan. If access to Italy’s unparalleled production expertise were thrown in as part of the deal, who could resist?

2. Take the show on the road.
The British Fashion Council and, to some extent, the U.S.-based CFDA have done a good job of promoting their designers abroad. As part of the London Showrooms events, a dozen young U.K. talents have even careened around Hong Kong together on a bus. While there are barely enough young Milan-based designers to fill a Smart car let alone a minibus, and its more established designers are already well known internationally, it shouldn’t be too hard to come up with the right kind of touring exhibition. Picture a mix of up-and-comers such as Umit Benan, Andrea Pompilio, and Fausto Puglisi; some cult brands like MP Massimo Piombo and Aspesi; and a couple of designer offshoots like Versace’s Versus line and Lapo Elkann’s highly covetable new made-to-measure collaboration with Gucci—all introduced by a charming, high-profile figure (yes, we’re talking to you, Lapo). That would go some way to showing the rest of the world the extent of Italy’s ambitions. Continue Reading “Seven Suggestions For Improving Milan Fashion Week” »

Gender Bender

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From J.W. Anderson‘s tube tops and frilled shorts (above right) to Meadham Kirchhoff‘s tunics and skirts to Sibling‘s fluffy cotton-candy-pink shorts, London’s up-and-coming designers put some extreme feminine twists on their Fall ’13 menswear collections. But while men (who aren’t Marc Jacobs or Andrej Pejic, that is) may be a little hesitant to jump on the gender-bending bandwagon, it would seem that women are, once again, craving an androgynous edge. The proof? Due to popular demand, menswear designers are creating looks tailored just for the ladies. For instance, as deputy editor Matthew Schneier reported from Pitti Uomo yesterday, Andrea Pompilio sent out nine cross-dressing girls (above left) before allowing his male models to walk the Fall runway. “They ask so many times for very petite sizes for women, so why not do it?” he said after the show. Over in London, E. Tautz‘s Patrick Grant was feeling the same pressure. “We just started a very small line of women’s shirts, which kicked off at the request of one of the stores in Japan—who came to our men’s show and asked if they could have small versions of our men’s shirts,” Grant told British Vogue, hinting that a full-on Savile Row-inspired womenswear range might be in his future (the shirt capsule will be available at Matches.com this spring). Of course, shes dressed like hes isn’t a revolutionary trend (Le Smoking, anyone?), but the overlap of his and hers styles in the men’s collections certainly has our attention. So, are designers pushing us to become a bunch of sexless style-ites? Hardly. But if you’re tempted to walk in the other gender’s shoes, Fall ’13′s menswear will more than afford you the opportunity.

Photo: Andrea Pompilio—Gianni Pucci/ InDigital Go Runway; J.W. Anderson—Yannis Viamos/ InDigital Go Runway