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July 10 2014

styledotcom Colleen Atwood's fantastical confections are coming to a store near you: stylem.ag/1qKWrvf pic.twitter.com/kivmFPG9tg

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61 posts tagged "Anna dello Russo"

Insta-Gratification: #MFW Edition

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. For this very special edition of Insta-Gratification, she’ll be calling out the best shots from #MFW. See below for today’s picks.

Monday, February 24

Giorgio and his Armani army.

Collect them all.

Marni, through Linda Fargo’s lens.

Missoni’s pre-show clique.

The finale bow. Squared. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification: #MFW Edition” »

Insta-Gratification

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In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. See below for today’s top shots.

Wednesday, February 5

From four eyes back to two.

Marina’s #NYFW mantra.

Ahhh! Real monsters.

It may not be Thursday, but we couldn’t resist this throwback.

Pusha T pushing tees on Marcelo Burlon. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification” »

Buckling Up for Thanksgiving and Beyond

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BeltsNew It bags and It shoes regularly enter the fashion orbit, but this season’s unexpected must-have accessory is the humble—or not so humble—belt. Back in September, we clocked Céline’s Thanksgiving-appropriate pilgrim buckle on Anna Dello Russo, Giovanna Battaglia, and Elina Halimi, and noticed plenty of statement-making cinching on the Spring runways, too. Michael Kors, Haider Ackermann, and Tom Ford created a wasp-waist silhouette with classic men’s leather belts, while other designers assumed a more-is-more approach. Lanvin’s Alber Elbaz featured sweet cummerbunds decorated with bedazzled hearts; Peter Dundas sent out medallion-spangled bands worthy of a boxing champion at Emilio Pucci; and Vera Wang was snapped wearing an ultrawide style that swallowed up her entire torso.

Here, just in time for Thanksgiving viewing, a slide show of our favorite waist-cinchers.

Can Moda Operandi Fix Karlie’s Fashion Heartbreak?

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“It changed the way that I started dressing,” reveals Karlie Kloss. The supermodel du jour is referring to a Steven Meisel photograph from the nineties, featuring supes of yore in decade-appropriate matching Chanel tweed miniskirts, jackets, and hats. For Kloss, it was the look that “got away.”

Debuting exclusively above, The One That Got Away is a video series produced by online luxury retailer Moda Operandi, in partnership with St. Regis Hotels & Resorts, detailing fashion heartbreak—that one runway or editorial outfit that you just had to have but could never locate—and how the site can mend your sartorial melancholy.

In addition to the beauty from St. Louis, Moda Operandi has tapped an impressive roster of industry tastemakers to lend their own testimonials, including Anna Dello Russo, Caroline Issa, and Poppy Delevingne (you can also shop the ladies’ latest fashion obsessions). Although, for these women, we’d imagine that the coveted and the wait-listed are never too far out of reach.

Michael Kors: “Fashion Is An Athletic Competition”

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Michael KorsToday, Michael Kors will join the ranks of Karl Lagerfeld, Dries Van Noten, and Oscar de la Renta when he accepts his Award for Artistry of Fashion from the Couture Council of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Though the man, who has created one of fashion’s largest empires with his namesake American sportswear label, hardly needs an introduction, Hilary Swank will be on hand at the Lincoln Center luncheon to properly present him with the honor. Style.com caught up with Kors to talk about fashion as a sport, triple shoulder pads, and more. And no, in case you were wondering, even a pro like Kors is not ready for fashion week. “You know, we are never ready until five minutes before the show,” Kors told us. “But that’s the way it is.”

You’ve been designing for over thirty years. Do you still find fashion exciting?
This morning, I was watching that swimmer Diana [Nyad] who is 64 years old, and she really had the endurance to keep trying and keep persevering. Fashion is an athletic competition and you have to have endurance and you have to stay excited about the idea that things are always changing. The world always changes, therefore fashion changes. I am excited about the fact that no matter how many years I have been doing it, you never know all the rules. You never know exactly what the game is going to be because the game is always changing.

What have been the most interesting changes you have seen in fashion during the course of your career?
There are three changes that have rocked fashion and continue to do so. Number one is the internet. Fashion became accessible quickly and 24/7 to anyone who was interested all around the planet. Clothes used to be very specific by country. The introduction of the Web was like when the Berlin Wall fell—it took down the barriers around the world in fashion. Number two, the rules have totally been thrown out the window. No one would have thought that people would be going to parties and fashion shows in February wearing sandals, or that they would wear sequins in the office during the day. Plus, the idea of “dressing your age,” has been totally diminished. In today’s world, if you have amazing legs, you might be a 60-year-old and wearing a short dress. Or, on the other hand, you might be 16 years old and instead of looking girly, you look sophisticated. The biggest change, though, is probably the democratization of fashion. When I started, you had to be wealthy and fashion-obsessed and live in a big city to really feel that there was anything in the fashion game for you. Today, it’s all about a certain taste level, a certain point of view design-wise, and it’s not about the price tag.

You are getting the award from FIT, where you attended school. What was one of the most challenging moments from your time there? I did not grow up sewing. There was no sewing machine in my house. The idea of sitting down and trying to be really exacting at the sewing machine was like an I Love Lucy episode—me sewing turned into Lucy at the chocolate factory. On the other side of the coin, I had been sketching since I was really small. When I arrived at school, they were trying to teach us really rudimentary things [about sketching] and I was like, “I have been doing since I was a 6-year-old.” I was either left back or a genius. I was never in the middle while I was in school. That’s for sure. Continue Reading “Michael Kors: “Fashion Is An Athletic Competition”” »