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July 28 2014

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23 posts tagged "Anna Wintour"

“Charles James: Beyond Fashion” Opens at the Costume Center

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Ribbon Cutting and Press Preview for Anna Wintour Costume Center and Charles James: Beyond Fashion COSTUME INSTITUTE Exhibition“Now, I know that Anna hates being the center of attention, so this all is probably killing her—but we love it,” said Michelle Obama as she took the stage at the ribbon cutting of the Metropolitan Museum’s new Anna Wintour Costume Center this morning. The first lady, sporting a green floral Naeem Khan, was speaking to a crowd of—as she put it so accurately—legends, including the likes of Marc Jacobs, Alber Elbaz, Donatella Versace, Olivier Theyskens, Alexander Wang, Ralph Lauren, Diane von Furstenberg, Calvin Klein, and many more. “The truth is, I’m here today because of Anna. I’m here because I have such respect and admiration for this woman whom I am proud to call my friend,” said Obama. Adding, “thanks to Anna and so many other dedicated individuals, the Met will be opening up the world of fashion like never before.”

The new world at the Met was brought to life by the soon-to-open Costume Center and its inaugural exhibition, Charles James: Beyond Fashion—a preview of which was given to guests after the first lady’s opening remarks. Wandering through the near empty (and Met Gala prepping) wings, the attendees made their way to the exhibition space. (Not without pausing to view the towering Charles James dress constructed entirely of roses in the lobby —“I have Michael Kors in my picture! Photo-bombing,” exclaimed Sarah Jessica Parker as she snapped away—and getting a bit lost along the way. “This is a sitcom. And a divine one at that,” narrated Kors.)

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The exhibition, in contrast to those of recent seasons’ past, is decidedly pared down. The emphasis is clear: The viewer is here is to see the dresses—James’ elaborately constructed ivory silk satin ball gowns, famous (or perhaps infamous?) little wrap “Taxi” dresses, and the voluminous “Tree” dress created for socialite Marietta Tree being just a few. Rotating X-rays, developed by architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro, allow the viewer to thoroughly examine the inner workings of many of James’ painstakingly created works. Original sketches and (some rather punchy) writings add further reference. “James was someone who engineered the hidden physics of a dress even though he is remembered for the loud surfaces of his designs,” explained head curator Harold Koda. “He is an artist who just happened to work in fashion. We believe that the public will leave this exhibition with an understanding of his great innovations.”

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This exhibition and space will see “hundreds of thousands of visitors, many of them students,” said Obama. “That’s really who I think about. Fashion isn’t an exclusive club for the few who can attend a runway show or shop at certain stores. This center is for anyone who is curious about fashion and how it impacts our culture and our history.”

The Anna Wintour Costume Center and Charles James: Beyond Fashion will open May 8.

Photo: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com

White Tie: A Very Serious Matter



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Marlene Dietrich Remember last year’s Met ball, when guests took some fairly questionable liberties with their punk ensembles? A few, like Kate Upton, just ignored the subject altogether. (“I don’t think I fully understood the theme,” she told us while standing on the red carpet in an emerald DVF column gown.) Well, there will be no sartorial messing around during Monday’s Charles James: Beyond Fashion gala—at least not where the men are concerned—because the Anna Wintour-imposed “white tie and decorations” dress code is a deeply serious one. “There is no leeway,” men’s fashion expert G. Bruce Boyer told WWD when asked about white tie. “If you say full evening dress, there isn’t any interpretation.” Apparently, this all-important outfit is causing quite a stir among the male guests.

The look, reserved for only the most formal of occasions, comprises a black or midnight blue tailcoat; matching trousers with a strip of satin or a braid down the side seams; a stiff, white pique wing collared shirt; a white vest; white cuff links and studs; white or gray gloves; black stockings; and black patent shoes. A top hat is technically optional (but let’s be serious, it’s not really). Unsurprisingly, these duds don’t come cheap, and will run Gala-goers up to $10,000 for a custom Savile Row iteration.

While some feel the style is overly elaborate and dated, it actually seems pretty straightforward to me. And personally, I’m more concerned with what the women will be wearing. I sincerely hope we won’t see too many starlets in ill-conceived plays on James’ masterful ball gowns. My secret dream, though, is that some brave femme will upstage the gents in her own white-tie suit—à la Marlene Dietrich. Does anyone know if Madonna’s coming this year?

Photo: Getty Images 

Public School Takes the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund’s Top Honor

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Dao-yi Chow, Maxwell Osborne

Tonight in New York, industry insiders and supporters such as Julianne Moore, Christina Ricci, and Diane von Furstenberg gathered at Spring Studios for the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund’s annual gala. Earlier this year, the decade-old initiative, which provides financial support and mentorship for emerging fashion talents, selected ten semi-finalists for its 2013 prize. And this evening, following a speech by Tom Ford, on-the-rise menswear label Public School, designed by Dao-Yi Chow and Maxwell Osborne, took the top honor. “We’ve been having such a great year, we were happy just to be here with you,” said the designers during their acceptance speech—and they weren’t kidding about the great year bit. The pair also took the 2013 Swarovski Award for Menswear at the CFDAs in June. “To say we’re tremendously humbled is an understatement,” added the winners, who were chosen by a committee that included Reed Krakoff, David Neville, Marcus Wainwright, Anna Wintour, and Jenna Lyons, among others.

The runners up, too, expressed their excitement. “Being in this room and on this stage [with Tom Ford and Julianne Moore], I want to stay here forever,” said second runner up, jewelry designer Mark Alary. Juan Carlos Obando, who was named as the first runner up, offered some heartfelt words of gratitude. “The word thank you is very small. I found a word that is really true. It’s I love you, to all the judges.”

Photo: Carly Otness/BFAnyc.com

Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book

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Carine Roitfeld

If Carine Roitfeld has proven anything in her three decades in the fashion game, it’s that she’s a master of reinvention—of both herself and others. All one needs to do is look at her latest CR Fashion Book cover—which features reality-TV-star-turned-quasi-fashion-world fascination Kim Kardashian showing off a gilded grill—to see that. The editor, stylist, and consultant, who left her decade-long post as editor in chief of Paris Vogue in 2011 only to launch her abovementioned biannual publication to much fanfare in New York a year later, is the subject of Fabien Constant’s new documentary, Mademoiselle C. The film, which debuted in New York last night, chronicles the making of the inaugural issue of Roitfeld’s magazine and offers an intimate look into the life of the editor. “I was very surprised when I saw the film for the first time,” Roitfeld told us, donning a youthful Céline crop top and Miu Miu denim skirt. “I didn’t imagine it would be so personal. You see everything—my family, my kids, my husband, my apartment, my [dance] lessons, and this was very difficult.” We have to say, though, it was refreshing to see the editor—who’s famed for working with everyone from Karl Lagerfeld and Tom Ford to Bruce Weber and Mario Testino—behave so candidly in front of the camera. Style.com caught up with Roitfeld prior to the film’s premiere to talk life after Vogue, Nicolas Ghesquière, the future of fashion, and what it means to be sexy.

Before I turned on my recorder, you were talking about how much you admire Coco Chanel. Why is that?
She came back to work at almost 70 years old, and she came back as a success, and America was the first country to welcome her. France didn’t. They always say, you’re never a king or a queen in your own country.

Is that why you came to New York to launch CR Fashion Book? Do you feel like the Americans made you a “queen”?
I think America was very nice with me, because the day I finished Paris Vogue, I immediately got a phone call from America. Once you’re in New York, you jump. Paris is mostly retired people—I love it, and it’s a beautiful city, but it’s quite slow. In New York, you can do anything—you can shoot on Sundays, you can shoot at night, you can get a pink dog, everything you want is possible. It’s like Jay-Z’s song about the Big Apple—you never stop.

Do you miss being the editor in chief of Paris Vogue?
No. I still like the title. I think it’s a magical title, and there was a Vogue before me, there will be a Vogue after me. I have no regrets. Ten years is quite long. Otherwise, you stay forever, and you settle into office life, and I don’t like office life. It’s difficult to do things on your own, but I think it’s very exciting, and everyone says, oh, you look younger than before, and it’s just because I’m learning more.

Do you think that Emmanuelle Alt is taking Paris Vogue in the right direction?
I will not look at it. It’s her thing. It’s totally different. I don’t want to compare and I don’t want to judge. I’m over this now, you know? I do my own thing, and it takes me enough time, enough energy, I’m not here to criticize. I don’t care. I have so many projects—I’ve become a cover girl and a grandma at the same time. I have so many exciting things in my life. I don’t need to look back.

Before you launched CR Fashion Book, there were rumors that you weren’t on the best of terms with Nicolas Ghesquière. What’s your relationship like with him now?
This is the bullshit of politics in fashion. I’ve never had a problem with Nicolas. I just sent him a text and said, “I miss you!” I’ve known him since the very beginning. I think he’s the most talented person in fashion. He’s very, very smart. I’m sure he’s coming back, and I hope it’s very soon, because we miss him. And I think he’s going to surprise everyone. There are not so many big talents today, and he’s one of them.

Inevitably, Mademoiselle C is going to be compared to The September Issue, and you to Anna Wintour. How do you feel about being compared to her?
I was compared to Anna for many years. But I worked with her. I was working for her, and I think she’s a very tough woman, but she’s very honest. She’s a hard worker, and she and Grace [Coddington] have a lot of passion. And you feel passion in Mademoiselle C, too. Totally different, though. Vogue is the biggest magazine in the world; they have a lot of money. For our first issue, we had four people doing the magazine, but we have the same passion. Continue Reading “Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book” »

Fashion Features on Forbes’ Most Powerful Women List

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Miuccia Prada takes a bow

Forbes released its 2013 list of the world’s most powerful women earlier today, and on it were social and political movers and shakers: Hillary Clinton, Michelle Obama, Nancy Pelosi, and Oprah Winfrey; megawatt stars: Beyoncé, Angelina Jolie, and Gisele Bündchen; and one or two surprises (Shakira at number 52, for example). But fashion’s power players held their own against heads of state (Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel came in at number one), businesswomen, and celebrities alike. Miuccia Prada (58), Diane von Furstenberg (74), newly crowned billionaire Tory Burch (69), Anna Wintour (41), and Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts (52) all earned much-deserved spots on the list. Hats off to the industry’s—and the world’s—leading ladies.

Photo: Pierre Verdy/ Getty Images