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23 posts tagged "Anna Wintour"

Luhrmann Gets Grilled on Gatsby

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“I wanted the audience to feel like the people who read Gatsby in the twenties,” said director Baz Luhrmann during yesterday’s intimate luncheon and discussion of The Great Gatsby at the New York Public Library. “Back then, it was dangerous and of the moment.” Following a string of stylish events and a splashy New York premiere worthy of any Fitzgerald novel, the event was a scholarly affair hosted by Anna Wintour, NYPL President Tony Marx, and editor in chief of The New Yorker, David Remnick. The latter moderated a Q&A with the film’s star-studded cast and crew.

Just steps from the library’s trove of Fitzgerald first editions, the film’s stars, Tobey Maguire, Joel Edgerton, Isla Fisher, and Carey Mulligan (DiCaprio was absent), offered insight into playing some of literature’s most memorable characters. “Daisy became a cocktail of a lot of research,” revealed Mulligan, who plumbed Princeton’s archives for the author’s intimate correspondence with muses Zelda Fitzgerald and Ginevra King. “I fell in love with these two women. The more I read their words, the more real Daisy became.” Fisher, who plays the down-on-her-luck Myrtle Wilson, admitted that her character’s capricious tendencies were hardly far-fetched. “I often play a floozy,” the Australian starlet deadpanned in a Chloé ensemble.

But perhaps the keenest observation came from the film’s scorer, Jay-Z, who was the first to see a rough cut. “We went to lunch afterward, and Jay told me, ‘The thing about this movie is that it’s aspirational,’” recalled Luhrmann. “I think he really nailed it. With Gatsby, everybody thinks of the parties, the fashion, and the champagne. I do hope the movie has a lot of razzle-dazzle, but ultimately it’s a book about hope.”

Photo: Courtesy photo

Anarchy In the Met

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“Fashion has lost its edge,” said curator Andrew Bolton at a preview of the Met’s upcoming 2013 Punk: Chaos to Couture exhibition yesterday morning. The statement was in response to a query about why the Met chose to explore the rebellious seventies subculture at this particular time. “Punks were so brave and noble. I just think fashion needs an injection of that at the moment,” the curator told Style.com.

If the garments that joined Bolton on the podium during his introduction to the exhibition (looks from McQueen, Chanel, and Rodarte among them) were any indication, punk has been fighting its way into fashion for quite some time—since Zandra Rhodes’s slash- and safety-pin-infused 1977 “Conceptual Chic” collection, to be exact. The new show, explained Bolton, is a prequel to the Met’s 2006 Anglomania and will examine punk as an aesthetic, rather than an attitude. “Punk smashed every convention,” he said. “It prized originality, authenticity, and individualism.” While counterintuitive, these qualities, he said, put punk on the same, or at least a very similar, plane as couture. Continue Reading “Anarchy In the Met” »

Galliano Returns

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He’s back. This morning, WWD released an extensive feature announcing that for the first time since his Paris café outburst and departure from Dior, John Galliano has reemerged—in Oscar de la Renta’s studio, of all places. Galliano will work in de la Renta’s studio throughout the next three weeks, in an effort to reimmerse himself in the fashion world. Believed to have been facilitated by Anna Wintour, who is a close friend of de la Renta and was a key player in Galliano’s early-nineties comeback, the partnership is somewhat undefined, but de la Renta, who told WWD that he is a “great admirer of [Galliano's] talent,” asserts that he’ll welcome the designer’s input on his upcoming collection.

The story also features statements from Galliano, who comes out as a recovering alcoholic and apologizes for his anti-Semitic statements. “I have been in recovery for the past two years. Several years prior to my sobriety, I descended into the madness of the disease. I said and did things which hurt others, especially members of the Jewish community. I have expressed my sorrow privately and publicly for the pain which I caused, and I continue to do so. I remain committed to making amends to those I have hurt,” he said.

While this is, as WWD notes, perhaps the biggest fashion comeback since Chanel, it seems a surprising and unexpected move on both designers’ parts. The simplest explanation would be that Galliano is posed to take over for de la Renta, now 80, in the event that he were to retire. However, de la Renta dispels this notion. “Am I retiring? Is John going to replace me? Certainly not. I hope to be around for a long time.” Galliano has not yet revealed what he’ll do after his stint with de la Renta.

Photo: Victor Boyko/ Getty Images

Backstage with JD

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Model turned party and backstage fashion photographer JD Ferguson is known for capturing the sometimes stunning, sometimes hilarious, but always honest moments of fashion weeks around the globe. This Wednesday, the sharpshooter will head to Fashion Week Berlin to open his exhibition, JD Ferguson: Backstage Pass. Posted at MILA gallery and sponsored by V magazine (for whom he often shoots), the show features Ferguson’s candid images of catwalkers (like Lily Donaldson and Hanne Gaby Odiele) designers (Karl Lagerfeld) celebrities (Hilary Swank, Eva Mendes, Diane Kruger), and editors (he even got a shot of Anna Wintour almost smiling). “I hope the exhibition helps people see how fun backstage can be,” says Ferguson. “Yes, it’s definitely a lot of hard work and a grueling schedule, but there’s an energy that you can’t find anywhere else.” Some of Ferguson’s favorite images include a photo of Karl Lagerfeld and Lady Bunny (below), male models in wigs and makeup at a Galliano show, and a picture of Lily Donaldson “rushing to the runway” at Dolce & Gabbana (below). “I’d arrived late and didn’t get anything, and then suddenly I turned around and there was Lily, giving herself a once-over in the mirror. It ended up being the only image I got.”

Next up for Ferguson? His first book. But it’s not quite what one would expect from a member of the jet-setting fashion crew. “After five years straight of fashion, parties, and heavy travel, I’ve been on sabbatical in my hometown in the South, where I’ve fallen in love with photographing children,” he says. “Specifically, children who are a part of the adoptive process. It’s been very rewarding and a welcome break.”

JD Ferguson: Backstage Pass kicks off with a party on January 16 and will be open to the public from January 17 through February 23 at MILA Kunstgalerie, Linienstrasse 154, 10015 Berlin.


Photo: JD Ferguson

Karl Lagerfeld Hates Whining, Likes Dallas

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This year’s WWD CEO Summit featured candid discussions with fashion superstars such as Marc Jacobs and Proenza Schouler’s Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez. Yesterday afternoon, Karl Lagerfeld gave an interview to Bridget Foley for the conference’s grand finale. The likes of Sarah Jessica Parker, Anna Wintour, and model Brad Kroenig and his son (and Lagerfeld’s godson), Hudson, came out for the talk. Foley began by acknowledging last year’s numerous designer shake-ups and asked Lagerfeld what makes a successful designer/fashion house relationship (he’s been at Chanel since 1983, so presumably he has a good one). “I think the important thing is that you have to be behind the label and not use it as something that pushes your fame,” said Lagerfeld, adding later that his biggest irritations are “people who create complications” and “make things messy” because they think it causes them to seem serious. “This I hate. It’s the worst.” On the subject of Chanel as a business, he boasted that he’s never attended a meeting in 31 years (“Maybe there are marketing people, but I’ve never seen them,” he laughed) and noted that the house’s owner, Alain Wertheimer, never interferes with his creative process.

But that’s not to say Lagerfeld is out of touch with the house’s business side. In fact, he embraces his role as a “commercial” designer. Well aware that his Scottish Métiers d’Art show got him “100 million Euros in free advertising” from press, he feels his outrageous sets and locations make Chanel appealing to those viewing the collections online, rather than just to “fashion freaks.” He revealed that his next show stop is Dallas, because, after Coco Chanel reopened her atelier in the fifties, Neiman Marcus and the American press were supportive, while the French were not. “The Texan detail is a little [one], but with a little detail, you can tell a whole story. And I’m a storyteller.”

Couture, according to Karl, is not dead—apparently, Chanel’s couture clientele is up from twenty years ago. And when asked about designers who think the fashion schedule is too demanding—a topic about which he’s sounded off before—Lagerfeld quipped, “Don’t tell me that story. If you accept a job, you know the conditions of the job. After a certain amount of time, don’t start to play the victim…It’s like Olympic sports. You have to keep that level. And if you think it’s too much for creativity, don’t accept. Nobody’s forcing you to do the job. I do it because I enjoy it.” Other notable tidbits included his opinion on French politics (“I pay taxes in France, but I wouldn’t pay a cent more.”), whether technology has tainted fashion (“Oh no, no. We couldn’t do without it.”) his favorite artist (Jeff Koons: “He’s the right spirit of our times.”), and his sources of inspiration (“Everything. I’m a voyeur.”). Foley ended by asking Lagerfeld what his steps to success were. Naturally, this called for a Karl-ism: “A good staircase.”

Photo: John Aquino