Style.com

July 11 2014

styledotcom Our favorite front-row highlights from the Fall Couture shows: stylem.ag/1opOEyv pic.twitter.com/sP5EBpOjAf

Subscribe to Style Magazine
27 posts tagged "Anne Hathaway"

Instagram Fears the Nipple: An Exclusive Interview with Anja Rubik About Getting Kicked Off the Social Platform, and Celebrating the Naked Body

-------

Don't Fear the Nipple

Instagram doesn’t just fear the nipple—it’s terrified of it. This morning, Anja Rubik’s erotic magazine, 25, was kicked off the social media platform without warning. Why, you ask? 25 had posted an image or two that included partial female nudity. (One of said images may or may not have been a screen shot of yesterday’s Style.com homepage, which featured Rubik in Anthony Vaccarello’s transparent Fall ’14 finale look.) And that, apparently, was just not acceptable. “I think this whole thing is ridiculous,” Rubik told us by phone from Paris fashion week. “It’s like saying to the world that a woman’s body is offensive. You can’t show a nipple behind a sheer shirt?”

Yesterday, Style.com reported on Fall ’14′s nipple trend (which continued at Gareth Pugh). And while the judges are still out on whether this catwalk craze is a vehicle for female empowerment or objectification, we agree with Rubik that social media shouldn’t censor pictures that celebrate the body. “Like all forms of social media, Instagram is a form of a self-expression,” said Style.com social media editor Rachel Walgrove. “The digitally-driven have grown to accept it as an art form and prefer that companies not stifle their messages with their terms or censorship.”

What’s more is that there’s so much clothed vulgarity allowed on Instagram. Miley Cyrus can post a close-up of her derriere in a pair of white panties printed with a wagging tongue that reads “Bangers,” but Rubik can’t share a runway snap of her barely visible breasts? Pish posh. Here, in an exclusive interview, Rubik talks to Style.com about getting kicked off (and immediately relaunching on) Instagram, the dangers of censorship, and why there is no need to fear the nipple.

Instagram is obviously fearing the nipple, and they canceled your magazine’s account today because of it. How did you find out?
Well, [my colleague] who runs 25 magazine’s account called me and told me that it was down. We didn’t even get a warning. We know Instagram’s restrictions, and we’ve been very careful. So we started to think, What image could have triggered this? And actually, we think it was a screen shot of the Style.com homepage, where I’m wearing Anthony Vaccarello.

Stop. Are you serious?
Yes! And we loved [the image] because underneath, you guys wrote, “Don’t Fear the Nipple,” which is our slogan that originally came from an interview I did with Style.com, and it became our thing, and we did T-shirts around it. It’s all about empowering women and being comfortable with your body and your sexuality. Anyway, I guess that image triggered a lot of reports, which is why the account was closed.

Have you posted any other images that people might report?
Well, there was also an image I posted from French Vogue of a naked girl standing backward. You couldn’t see anything, but they took that down. And actually, this is the second time I’ve been thrown off Instagram. The first time was because a photographer friend of mine sent me a print with a beautiful note on it, and I posted a picture of it to say thank you, and they kicked me off for that without warning. It’s quite frustrating, especially because, when you look through Instagram, there are so many crude, vulgar images, which are apparently fine. But when you post a beautiful body of a naked woman, which is the most natural thing that can exist, then we have a problem. What’s the worst thing that will happen? Even if it’s children flipping through, why should they be offended by a breast? Especially if it’s photographed or shown in a very natural way that’s not vulgar.

It’s not like you’re posting porn.
No! Not at all!

So Instagram allows crass, clothed images but censors photographs that celebrate a woman’s nude body. What kind of message do you think that’s sending to the public?
I think it’s very strange. It makes us think that we should have some kind of complex about our bodies. It sends the message that our bodies are unnatural and not beautiful, and I think women need to fight this. Talking about sex and the naked body has become such a taboo, and that’s when people start having problems—when they can’t be open about it. We need to be proud of our bodies. We create all these really fake ideals of beauty nowadays with images of women that are physically altered, and women are trying to attain these insane, unrealistic ideals. But we show a natural woman naked and that’s an issue? I don’t understand it.

Do you hope that 25 can help make issues and discussions surrounding sex and the naked body less of a taboo?
Yes. I hope that is something that we’re doing through the magazine. We shoot all different women for 25—models and real women. Women shouldn’t feel like they need to hide their bodies. If you look at the sixties or the seventies, women were free and comfortable in their bodies. All this censorship can start to make women feel uncomfortable, and that’s a very big problem

Do you think that this fear of the female body is inherently American, or is it an international sentiment?
I feel that we see it much more in the States. In general, people in America tend to be a little bit more prude than in Europe. But I think it’s spreading, unfortunately. Europe is becoming more and more prude. And it’s ridiculous because when you turn on the TV—a reality show—you’re faced with so many vulgar images. That’s what should be censored and not allowed, in my opinion.

I see that 25 has relaunched with another Instagram account. Will you continue to try and push the envelope with the images you post?
We will. And if they kick us off, we’ll open another account. We’re here at fashion week [in Paris] and it’s an important event for fashion and women. So we thought we should open a new account to keep our readers updated going forward. But after fashion week, we’re going to have to decide how we approach this issue. I’m considering opening a private account so only our users can see the photos. Maybe that will solve the problem. I don’t know.

More generally, we have seen a lot of bare breasts on the runway for Fall ’14. Do you think this is a positive thing? And would you walk around in the Anthony Vaccarello finale look that you wore down the runway?
Yes! Of course. In the right place, why not? I would feel comfortable. I mean, I wouldn’t wear it on the street, but this whole nipple thing is insane. Didn’t people want Anne Hathaway to apologize because you could see the outline of her nipples in her Oscars dress? That’s crazy. That’s like apologizing for having a leg. Honestly. She wasn’t even showing the nipple! It was just peeking through the dress. Obviously there’s a nipple in there! Why do we care? That’s really awkward! We should be apologizing to her. There was nothing vulgar about that dress.

You said that you wouldn’t go braless in a completely sheer top when just walking down the street. Why not?
I think because the world, unfortunately, is not quite prepared for that. In Europe, I’d probably do it—in Italy or the south of France. But in other places, I think it would cause too much trouble.

Is there anything you’d like to say to Instagram or to members of the general public who fear the nipple?
They should wake up. We’re going backward—way backward. Instead of celebrating our bodies and moving forward and exploring our sensuality, we’re blocking all these things and making them shameful. And to the people who don’t like these images and report them on Instagram, just don’t follow us. It’s very simple. I don’t understand why they’re following us in the first place if they find our images so offensive. I’m not putting a gun to their heads.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com

Punctuation Meets Punk At Roger Vivier

-------

Tartan Virgule shoe

Long before there was the red sole, there was the “comma” shoe—also known as Roger Vivier’s Virgule. Launched in 1963, the shoe, famous for its curved heel, is the stuff of fashion lore. Last week, a major Vivier retrospective opened at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, Virgule etc.…In the footsteps of Roger Vivier, and yup, the shoe earned top billing out of the immense body of work from the man who considered himself an architect and an inventor first, and a shoemaker by happenstance. Vivier and his Virgule’s world tour stops in London tomorrow at Selfridges Shoe Galleries—the largest shoe department in the world and an undisputed mecca for shoe lovers. It is here where the house will open its first shop in an event hosted by Inès de la Fressange, current creative consultant for Vivier, and designer Bruno Frisoni. It is all part of an international expansion of the brand, which has already seen shops opened this year in Japan and China.

The Vivier house has deep roots in Britain. In 1953, its namesake designer created the royal shoes for HM Queen Elizabeth II’s Coronation. After that, he shoed the Duchess of Windsor—not to mention his laundry list of iconic non-British patrons, like Marlene Dietrich, Elizabeth Taylor, Jeanne Moreau, and Brigitte Bardot. Today, the house’s fan base is made up of the “elegant” types—Cate Blanchett, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, Anne Hathaway, Nicole Kidman—but that doesn’t mean the label can’t have a rebellious edge. For tomorrow’s Selfridges launch, the Virgule will be reissued in a punk-tinged tartan; the updated classic debuts exclusively above. Later that night at Le Baron, a party hosted by pop progeny Atlanta Cadenet-Taylor will introduce a new generation of fans to Vivier’s work, though one wonders if his shoes have ever danced to strains of EDM. In any event, it shows that the house isn’t just living on past glory—it’s looking ahead.

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Hollywood’s Most Powerful Stylists Revealed

-------

The results are in. Today, The Hollywood Reporter released its third annual list of Hollywood’s 25 Most Powerful Stylists. The winners include big names we’ve been hearing a lot about of late—Kate Young, who’s been whipping up a buzz with her new Target collection (and who styles Michelle Williams, Rachel Weisz, and Natalie Portman), came in at number four. Elizabeth Stewart, who chronicled her experience styling Amanda Seyfried, Jessica Chastain, Julia Roberts, and Cody Horn for the Golden Globes for Style.com, came in at number five. And Rachel Zoe, who styled Anne Hathaway and Jennifer Lawrence in their much-talked-about Oscar gowns, slid in at number three. Petra Flannery, who styles Emma Stone, Zoe Saldana, and Megan Fox, was this year’s runner-up. And the big winner is (drumroll, please) Leslie Fremar, who styles discerning stars like Julianne Moore, Charlize Theron, and Jennifer Connelly. A surprise on the list was designer (and Mick Jagger’s girlfriend) L’Wren Scott, who came in at number sixteen for dressing Nicole Kidman.

Photo: Courtesy of The Hollywood Reporter

And The Nominees Are…

-------

The frenetic buzz of awards season continues today with the Film Academy’s announcement of 2013′s Oscar nominees. Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln racked up an impressive twelve nods, best picture and best actor included. Jessica Chastain, Jennifer Lawrence, and Naomi Watts are up for the Actress in a Leading Role award, as are 85-year-old Amour star Emmanuelle Riva (the oldest nominee in the category in history) and 9-year-old Beasts of the Southern Wild lead Quvenzhané Wallis (the category’s youngest nominee in history). Amy Adams, Anne Hathaway, Sally Field, Helen Hunt, and Jackie Weaver are in the running for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, while the leading actor list includes Bradley Cooper, Joaquin Phoenix, Denzel Washington, Daniel Day-Lewis, and Hugh Jackman. Lincoln, Les Misérables, Life of Pi, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Zero Dark Thirty, Silver Linings Playbook, Amour, Django Unchained, and Argo are all up for Best Picture.

Naturally, during the ceremony on Feburary 24, we’ll have our eye on the stars’ red carpet styles. But with so many period films released in 2012, the masterminds behind this year’s blockbuster costumes are deserving of recognition, too. Jacqueline Durran is nominated in the Achievement in Costume Design category for the 19th-century Russian finery she designed for Anna Karenina (left), while Paco Delgado was nominated for Les Misérables. Joanna Johnston is also on the list for Lincoln‘s Civil War-era garb, and Eiko Ishioka and Colleen Atwood were nominated for Mirror Mirror and Snow White and the Huntsman, respectively. For the full list of nominees, click here.

Photo: Laurie Sparham / Courtesy of Focus Features

2013 BAFTA Nominees Announced

-------

Awards season is officially upon us. The Golden Globes are set for Sunday, January 13 (check back for our coverage), and today the nominees for the BAFTAs were announced. Lincoln, Argo, Zero Dark Thirty, and Les Misérables racked up the most nods, and red-carpet favorites like Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Marion Cotillard, Amy Adams, Jennifer Lawrence, and Helen Mirren (who just received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame), as well as Javier Bardem, Ben Affleck, Hugh Jackman, and Daniel Day-Lewis, are all up for honors. We’ll have to wait until the ceremony, which will be held at London’s Royal Opera House on February 10, to see who wins and, of course, what everyone wears. Click Here for the full list of nominees, or take a peek below. Continue Reading “2013 BAFTA Nominees Announced” »