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August 31 2014

styledotcom How to dress when the temps start to drop: stylem.ag/1tTGGmj pic.twitter.com/UbzzLm88hR

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36 posts tagged "A.P.C."

Here’s What Our Editors Will Be Buying for Fall

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It may be warm here in New York today, but the Fall collections are already hitting stores and cooler weather is just around the corner. Our Fall Shopping Guide should help you ready your wardrobe for the autumn months, but for some further inspiration, have a look at our editors’ Fall picks, below.

Nicole Phelps

Nicole Phelps, Executive Editor

A good fashion week dress from Damir Doma and a good fashion week shoe from Saint Laurent, not necessarily to be worn together. And because I’m not quite ready to admit that the shows are five weeks away, a pair of rehabbed vintage Levi’s from the new denim brand Re/Dun to wear all August long.

Damir Doma dress, $780, Buy it now; Saint Laurent kitten heel, $595, Buy it now; Re/Dun straight skinnies, $232, for more information, visit redun.com.

Margiela

Katharine K. Zarrella, Associate News Editor

I have poor blood circulation and am thus constantly freezing. I can’t wear my vintage 1920s monkey-fur coat all the time (though I’d love to), so I’m planning to rely on this cropped goat-hair jacket from Maison Martin Margiela for some deeply chic everyday insolation.

Maison Martin Margiela goat-hair-trimmed wool-blend cropped jacket, $2,590, Buy it now

Sandro

Amber Kallor, Senior Beauty Editor

Should another Polar Vortex descend upon New York, I’ll be prepared with this oil-print anorak from Sandro. The sleek silhouette makes it easy to slip in and out of backstage, but the down filling provides plenty of warmth while I’m trekking from show to show.

Sandro oil-printed anorak, $775, Buy it now

Adam Lippes

Brittany Adams, Associate Fashion Editor

The bitter Polar Vortex we New Yorkers endured this past winter shook me to the core (I’m still in a state of disbelief walking around in bare legs this summer) and already has me preparing for the cold months ahead. If there’s one trend I’m eager to get my hands on next season, it’s a statement-making shearling. I’m currently pining over Adam Lippes‘ oh-so-cuddly navy belted topper. It’s the stylish equivalent of a bear hug and will be sure to earn me compliments while keeping out the chill.

Adam Lippes belted shearling coat, $3,290, Buy it now

Missoni

Rachel Walgrove, Social Media Editor

It’s time to upgrade the ponchos that are currently in my closet. In chenille, this Missoni knit basically doubles as a wearable blanket. Plus, it’s super-easy to throw on over just about anything.

Missoni chenille poncho, $250, Buy it now

APC

Noah Johnson, Deputy Editor

Louis Wong consistently makes impeccable leather jackets under his line for A.P.C., but this season’s Ferris jacket is the first one that I must own. Colored suede was among my favorite trends from the Spring ’15 men’s shows, but I’m impatient, so waiting until next season is out of the question.

A.P.C. Louis W. Ferris jacket, $1,395, Buy it now

Zana Bayne

Kristin Anderson, Assistant Editor of Special Projects

When fashion week hits, my current shoulder bag may not cut it. This stunning tote from Zana Bayne is big enough for a notebook, tape recorder, flats, and maybe even a pilfered Perrier (or two).

Zana Bayne pentagram handbag, $525, Buy it now

Gucci

Jessica Teves, Site Director

I’m a bit mad for cozy pastels, so this boxy Gucci peacoat is the perfect transitional piece for the cooler months—plus, it livens up my go-to uniform of skinny jeans and a white T-shirt.

Gucci wool double-breasted peacoat, $2,500. For more information, visit gucci.com.

Shrimps

Emily Farra, Editorial Coordinator

I love Shrimps’ irreverent approach to faux fur—there’s nothing stuffy or upper crust about it. This camel, blush, and orange coat features all of my favorite fall colors, plus it won’t break the bank like the real thing would. I’d much rather wear a faux color-blocked version than blend into the pack of women in the same chocolate-brown mink.

Shrimps faux-fur coat, $920, Buy it now

The Row

Erinn Hermsen, Assistant Managing Editor

Despite my Wisconsin roots, I’m a wimp when it comes to the cold. Sweaters are a key part of my daily uniform during the fall and winter months, and The Row‘s cozy cashmere version would be the perfect addition to my rotation.

The Row cashmere sweater, $4,550. For more information, visit saksfifthavenue.com.

Photo: Courtesy Photos 

Here’s the New A.P.C. Kanye Collection in Full, and a Chat With Jean Touitou

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For the second and last season of the A.P.C. Kanye collection, the brand’s proprietor, Jean Touitou, and Mr. West went deep into military archives. What they came up with is an arsenal of cool, comfortable-looking, luxurious casual clothes that are as unique and appealing as they are smart and simple. This will be your last opportunity to own a piece of this collection, as West is moving on to build his sportswear empire with Adidas. So put July 17 on your calendar—that’s the day it goes on sale (and will likely be your only chance, as it will surely sell through fast).

We caught up with Touitou last week as he was preparing to show his Spring/Summer 2015 collection in Paris to chat about this partnership, his outlook on future collaborations, and A.P.C.’s American expansion.

See the entire A.P.C. Kanye collection here.

How did the process of working with Kanye evolve over time?

The process was easier the second time because we have learned more from each other, and then also we stopped by the military archive. It was surprisingly easier the second time, except at the end.

What happened at the end?

What happened at the end is exactly what he does to his own records, so I didn’t take it personally—like when it’s something he makes, and ten days before it drops, and then he wants to start from scratch. In music things are so possible, especially with today’s technology, good engineer, good computer, you could stretch time, but in fashion there are so many people involved, from weaving, knitting, choosing the yarn, choosing the color, making the pattern, making the first samples. It’s so much more material, but again, I don’t feel badly about him pushing the limits. So that was the difficulty. But apart from that, it was perfectly easy.

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So he wanted to change things—

That happens until, like, sixteen minutes before the presentation, I was changing things.

But at some point you were able to settle on some final decisions?

Oh, of course, of course, because it’s going to be in the stores and online on July 17, and we don’t have a reputation of being late. You have to manufacture all the clothes, and it’s not just virtual, it’s real things. At some point you have to say, “This is what it’s going to be.”

What led you to the military archives? Was that Kanye’s idea?

For a very simple reason: I do have archives where we live in Paris, and one day I wanted to show him what I did for almost twenty-seven years, and you know, there was a lot of my old stuff, a lot of A.P.C., and we started the process of designing from there.

You know, when you design something, you have to start with something, so that’s where we were, at my big archives to start with something. It’s not the process for designing a conceptual collection, but that’s why when we said we want a parka, its nice to see a parka from this army, and this army and that army and make your own design of it.

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What was Kanye’s part in the design? For instance, would he have input on every aspect of how the parka was going to be made?

Of course he would decide with me on every part of it. We would choose the fabrics and the color and the proportions, sleeves, shoulders, and there were a lot of fittings. It’s not like we want to do a parka, send the pattern to China, and OK we have the parka and I OK it. It’s not like that at all. We produce a first and second sample, a mock sample, a third sample, and finally the last one is good. It’s like a couture piece for every item.

Was it a more involved process than what you typically do for A.P.C.?

No, it was the same, with being involved and making the patterns. It was exactly the same.

A.P.C. has done a lot of collaborations—Nike, Supreme, Carhartt, and others. What’s your perspective on collaborating with other brands?

I have no perspective. I’m tired of collaborating. I’m tired of it. And there’s not so many people that I want to do anything with.

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So you’re feeling like this is the last one?

Kanye has his own line with Adidas now. And we do Nike because we don’t know how to do running shoes and they know how to do it right. I don’t have a major collaborating project. But I’m creating a new brand, and we’re launching Vanessa Seward in March, launching the brand with a new company and everything.

So you’re no longer focusing on collaborations?

Well, if it’s something very interesting to me, I’ll go for it. But I don’t look for collaborations, I just wait until it knocks at my door. I’m not pushing it all, doing something as humongous as creating a brand. Days are only twenty-four hours. And also we opened new stores. We’re not a huge corporation, we’re a small independent company.

The expansion of A.P.C. has really been impressive. Are you planning on continuing to expand?

No, we’re just focusing on America, and France is like the Titanic—still dancing, but it’s going to be at the bottom of [the ocean] soon. So I’m really happy to bring the brand to America.

Photo: Courtesy A.P.C.

Vanessa Seward: Sensible Luxury Crusader

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Vanessa SewardFollowing five collaborative capsules with Jean Touitou’s A.P.C., Vanessa Seward is taking things to the next level and launching her own brand with the financial support of A.P.C. She’s already begun working on her first collection, which is set to debut in Paris for the Fall ’15 season, and a series of stand-alone stores are already in the works. Here, Seward, an alum of Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, and, most recently, Azzaro, talks to Style.com about her vision of sensible luxury, why low-waisted jeans are the worst, and what we can expect from her new line.

How did your collaboration with A.P.C. start? Was it kind of an experiment?
It was not even an experiment: Two and a half years ago, it was a one-shot, because [A.P.C. owner Jean Touitou and I] knew each other, we liked each other, and I missed working. So he said, “How about doing a collection with us?” And because I loved the brand, I was really happy to. It was a brand I bought and used and understood, so it was a nice challenge.

Did it come as a relief after doing so much high-fashion?
In a way, because when you’re doing high-end fashion, it becomes very difficult to do casual because it’s always a bit overpriced. And somehow it never looks as good. The couture houses have a wonderful hand for evening dresses, but casual is more complicated. What looks cool is when you combine the two. With the very first [A.P.C.] collection, I did things with couture fabrics combined with jeans and Irish sweaters. That was a relief for me. And I think a couture sensibility with jeans made for a really good fit. They sold out really quickly.

Your catchphrase is “sensible luxury.” Could you define it for us?
Even when a woman earns a good living in France today, luxury is still very inaccessible—and among the more accessible brands, there is a heavy connotation: You’re either boho or rock-chic, etc. It feels like a disguise. In previous generations we consumed less—you bought something a little more expensive that would last for years, and that really speaks to me. Even if they’re not as expensive, clothes are still an investment, and a nice sweater or skirt should last and make you look good without making you look like a fashionista.

What do you keep in mind when shopping? Is there anything you’ve bought lately that you love?
When you buy something, it’s important to be able to see yourself wearing it ten years into the future, and knowing you won’t feel stupid when you look at it in a photo. I don’t like over-designed clothes. I like clothes that are simple, that have a nice fit, that make you look good and don’t have too many details. Your personality is what counts. Then, luxury has to come in the finishings, in the cut, in the color, and material.

What have you bought lately?
I love my new Michel Vivien sandals because they fit with my notion of sensible luxury and they are also timeless. I get an “old Saint Laurent” feel from them. And at the same time, they will not look dated. I could give you a whole list of what I bought at A.P.C. For example, the Victoire jeans from the last collaboration are an homage to my friend Victoire de Castellane. I’ve known Victoire since I was her assistant at Chanel, and she has always been a big inspiration.

Are you doing the muse thing?
Yes and no. Victoire, her sister, and the friends around me are all big inspirations. For me, the danger lies in always designing [for oneself]. The collaboration with A.P.C. is a bit like working with a publisher. I try to design things that appeal to a wide range of women.

Are you—like many of us—relieved to be getting away from low-waisted jeans?
Oh, my God, so happy. There’s nothing more depressing, there’s nothing that makes me feel fatter than low-waisted jeans! There was a whole period when I would just not wear jeans anymore. At every house I worked with, and especially with Mr. Azzaro, I learned a lot about respecting the body. I like things that make you look good without crossing the thin line into overtly sexy.

What’s your take on Parisian style?
It’s about knowing how to balance an effect. Those who grow up in a family culture of sensible luxury will hold on to an Hermès bag they inherited, or an old jacket, and they are good at mixing couture with jeans. If they are going to be really dressed up, they won’t wear much makeup and their hair won’t be too done. That makes it cool.

What can we expect from your debut collection?
I’ve started working on the collection and it’s almost like psychoanalysis. I’m basically reviewing my whole life: I was brought up in London, and my family is Argentine, but they are a bit English, and there’s a lot of Paris, too. Then there’s all the time I spent working at Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, and Azzaro. When I was working with those brands, I was thinking about their codes. Now I am creating my own. Just thinking about what my staples are is really exciting. What we call “affordable luxury” is just about the price; what I am trying to do is broader than that. I want to do something seductive that plays on bon chic, bon genre with a little naughtiness, and I think I can do that in a way that is mine.

Photo: Tung Walsh

A.P.C. Invests in Vanessa Seward’s New Label

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Vanessa Seward

The sixth and final Vanessa Seward x A.P.C. collection will be unveiled this September, but come 2015, Seward will have a new project: her own ready-to-wear label. WWD reports that Seward will unveil her first namesake collection during Fall ’15 Paris fashion week. A.P.C. will provide logistical and financial support for the venture.

Best known for giving new life to Azzaro, Seward also held positions at Chanel and Yves Saint Laurent. In an interview, Seward said she wanted to create a “chic, timeless wardrobe” for her new line. A.P.C.’s Jean Touitou referred to it as “sensible luxury.”

Seward’s collaborations with A.P.C. are a prime example of the abovementioned aesthetic—she often uses luxury materials in a modern way to create garments at contemporary prices. “I’m going to be able to go futher with my own design identity,” she said. The collection will include casual and formal pieces as well as shoes, bags, belts, and costume jewelry. Her first boutique is set to open in Paris in September 2015, and additional locations in L.A. and New York are a top priority down the road. With such strong support from Touitou, we can only expect great things.

Photo: Courtesy Photo 

EXCLUSIVE: A.P.C. + Nike Is Back for Spring

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This Thursday, A.P.C. will release its latest collaboration with Nike, an Air Max 1 done up in an all-navy combo of suede, mesh, and leather, with a white midsole and gum outsole. You’re seeing them first, exclusively on Style.com. The kicks are simple and clean, keeping true to A.P.C.’s understated aesthetic. Available for both men and women in-stores and online for $120.

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