Style.com

August 21 2014

styledotcom Well here's something we share with Gia Coppola: a love of wine. stylem.ag/1tq46j6 pic.twitter.com/34MqWIfrMu

Subscribe to Style Magazine
13 posts tagged "Azzaro"

Azzaro Gets Catty for Its Return to Couture

-------

Azzaro

Perhaps it was pure coincidence that Arnaud Maillard and Álvaro Castejón created this Azzaro Couture collection—the first the house has shown in thirty years—around the theme of felines. The iconic French house has shown a nine-lives resilience ever since its founder passed away more than a decade ago. It also allowed the designers to push a fierce message that played to their strength of sexy eveningwear.

Backstage, the designers introduced their woman-as-panther, pushing the visual pun to extremes with sequined-rimmed cutouts like cat scratches and bejeweled claw markings. As a follow-up to the success of their black dress from Spring ’14—the one with sheer strips running like a tributary down the front and back that flung actress Jaimie Alexander into the spotlight when she wore it last November—they introduced a new iteration with precise paneling that was marginally less suggestive. “There was a before and an after,” said Castejón, still astonished that the dress generated so much buzz—and, in turn, so many custom orders.

Azzaro

Reams of mousseline and chiffon cascading from fitted bodices would suggest that the Azzaro minx of today remains faithful to a look of yesteryear. But the further the surface detail strayed from the feline narrative—glossy black seed beads were actually springy placements of silicone or mirrored geometric bits—the closer the looks came to feeling of the moment.

As Maillard and Castejón readied their girls for the runway, they wore white felt gloves to avoid leaving fingerprints on the plated belts that reined in georgette caftans or gave superhero emphasis to jumpsuits. In Azzaro tradition, they bestowed every look with a name from a single letter of the alphabet: R (as in “Reuben” for a white Perfecto with a skirt of fox fur). That letter also conjures up words like respect and risk—and the designers are attempting to establish a balance between the two. But there’s one more word that should be their main focus going forward: relevance.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Vanessa Seward: Sensible Luxury Crusader

-------

Vanessa SewardFollowing five collaborative capsules with Jean Touitou’s A.P.C., Vanessa Seward is taking things to the next level and launching her own brand with the financial support of A.P.C. She’s already begun working on her first collection, which is set to debut in Paris for the Fall ’15 season, and a series of stand-alone stores are already in the works. Here, Seward, an alum of Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, and, most recently, Azzaro, talks to Style.com about her vision of sensible luxury, why low-waisted jeans are the worst, and what we can expect from her new line.

How did your collaboration with A.P.C. start? Was it kind of an experiment?
It was not even an experiment: Two and a half years ago, it was a one-shot, because [A.P.C. owner Jean Touitou and I] knew each other, we liked each other, and I missed working. So he said, “How about doing a collection with us?” And because I loved the brand, I was really happy to. It was a brand I bought and used and understood, so it was a nice challenge.

Did it come as a relief after doing so much high-fashion?
In a way, because when you’re doing high-end fashion, it becomes very difficult to do casual because it’s always a bit overpriced. And somehow it never looks as good. The couture houses have a wonderful hand for evening dresses, but casual is more complicated. What looks cool is when you combine the two. With the very first [A.P.C.] collection, I did things with couture fabrics combined with jeans and Irish sweaters. That was a relief for me. And I think a couture sensibility with jeans made for a really good fit. They sold out really quickly.

Your catchphrase is “sensible luxury.” Could you define it for us?
Even when a woman earns a good living in France today, luxury is still very inaccessible—and among the more accessible brands, there is a heavy connotation: You’re either boho or rock-chic, etc. It feels like a disguise. In previous generations we consumed less—you bought something a little more expensive that would last for years, and that really speaks to me. Even if they’re not as expensive, clothes are still an investment, and a nice sweater or skirt should last and make you look good without making you look like a fashionista.

What do you keep in mind when shopping? Is there anything you’ve bought lately that you love?
When you buy something, it’s important to be able to see yourself wearing it ten years into the future, and knowing you won’t feel stupid when you look at it in a photo. I don’t like over-designed clothes. I like clothes that are simple, that have a nice fit, that make you look good and don’t have too many details. Your personality is what counts. Then, luxury has to come in the finishings, in the cut, in the color, and material.

What have you bought lately?
I love my new Michel Vivien sandals because they fit with my notion of sensible luxury and they are also timeless. I get an “old Saint Laurent” feel from them. And at the same time, they will not look dated. I could give you a whole list of what I bought at A.P.C. For example, the Victoire jeans from the last collaboration are an homage to my friend Victoire de Castellane. I’ve known Victoire since I was her assistant at Chanel, and she has always been a big inspiration.

Are you doing the muse thing?
Yes and no. Victoire, her sister, and the friends around me are all big inspirations. For me, the danger lies in always designing [for oneself]. The collaboration with A.P.C. is a bit like working with a publisher. I try to design things that appeal to a wide range of women.

Are you—like many of us—relieved to be getting away from low-waisted jeans?
Oh, my God, so happy. There’s nothing more depressing, there’s nothing that makes me feel fatter than low-waisted jeans! There was a whole period when I would just not wear jeans anymore. At every house I worked with, and especially with Mr. Azzaro, I learned a lot about respecting the body. I like things that make you look good without crossing the thin line into overtly sexy.

What’s your take on Parisian style?
It’s about knowing how to balance an effect. Those who grow up in a family culture of sensible luxury will hold on to an Hermès bag they inherited, or an old jacket, and they are good at mixing couture with jeans. If they are going to be really dressed up, they won’t wear much makeup and their hair won’t be too done. That makes it cool.

What can we expect from your debut collection?
I’ve started working on the collection and it’s almost like psychoanalysis. I’m basically reviewing my whole life: I was brought up in London, and my family is Argentine, but they are a bit English, and there’s a lot of Paris, too. Then there’s all the time I spent working at Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, and Azzaro. When I was working with those brands, I was thinking about their codes. Now I am creating my own. Just thinking about what my staples are is really exciting. What we call “affordable luxury” is just about the price; what I am trying to do is broader than that. I want to do something seductive that plays on bon chic, bon genre with a little naughtiness, and I think I can do that in a way that is mine.

Photo: Tung Walsh

Runway to Red Carpet: Arty Parties and High-Glamour Mesh

-------

Karl Lagerfeld and Tilda SwintonWhile fashion and art have always gone hand in hand, the Spring ’14 runways were influenced by art more than ever. The creative cross-pollination continued this week with several designer-sponsored museum galas, which brought a bevy of well-dressed power players to the red carpet. New York City’s Museum of Modern Art’s tribute to Tilda Swinton, co-chaired by Karl Lagerfeld, had many stars donning Chanel’s recent runway wares on Tuesday evening. Jessica Biel, Lupita Nyong’o, and, of course, the lady of honor, Swinton, all turned up in Karl’s latest looks to celebrate. Later in the week, the Dior-sponsored Guggenheim International gala and pre-party in New York saw screen sirens like Elizabeth Olsen, Natalie Portman, Leelee Sobieski, and Cobie Smulders posing on the red carpet in a host of Raf Simons’ takes on the LBD. On Saturday, Gucci presented the Los Angeles County Museum of Art 2013 Art + Film gala, which was studded with A-listers in showstopping Gucci gowns. Salma Hayek in particular stood out in an embellished beige Gucci Première halter dress with a sparkling belted waist.

While mesh is not the first thing that comes to mind for black-tie affairs, strategically placed mesh has been making its way onto the red carpet, thanks to its starring role on many Spring ’14 runways. Zoe Saldana attended the LACMA 2013 Art + Film gala in a figure-hugging black Gucci gown with strips of mesh panels down the sides, which subtly made the otherwise conservative dress sexy. The following evening, Jaimie Alexander took the trend up several notches at the Thor: The Dark World premiere in L.A. The actress chose a floor-length, long-sleeve, high-neck Azzaro Spring ’14 dress that showed about as much skin as it covered.

Here, more of this week’s red-carpet highlights.

Photo: Billy Farrell / BFAnyc.com

A.P.C. X Vanessa Seward: A Cure For The Common Collaboration

-------

Collaboration fatigue is an affliction that’s been making the rounds among fashion folk for some time. But the collection that ex-Azzaro designer Vanessa Seward has done for A.P.C. is quite darling enough to pierce the haze. For starters, there’s the happily un-corporate, très A.P.C. way it came together. “We’ve all known each other for quite some time. Then Vanessa, how do you say, had some free time, and the will to do something with us. That was it,” explained A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou, in his usual puckish manner, at the label’s Left Bank showroom a couple days ago.

But mostly there’s the clothes, which take A.P.C.’s essential nature and give it a pretty upgrade in couture fabrics, some from the archive of storied Swiss mill Abraham. The bronze-y gold lamé, however, is a new version that’s far less itchy than the old stuff, and thanks to Touitou’s knack for navigating production, the prices are still right. A sweet pale golden jacquard lamé dress tops the line out at around $700, while a pair of hot pants in the same fabric rings in at around $325. In the navy and red floral silk, the frill-necked dress is about $590, while a flippy skirt is about $400. The capsule is tightly edited, but these seem like clothes that you can wear for seasons to come without feeling like you’re in that piece. Getting your hands on them is another issue. At least A.P.C.’s new West Village store is finally open, after a few landmark-driven delays—another place to line up.

Photo: Ezra Petronio

The New Chambre Maids (And Men), David Gandy: The Book, Fly The Standard Skies, And More…

-------


France’s Chambre Syndicale, the body that organizes Paris’ fashion shows, has announced its newest members and associates. Congrats to Azzaro, Carven, Damir Doma, Felipe Oliveira Baptista, Thimister, Véronique Leroy, and American (sometimes) in Paris Zac Posen. [WWD]

Dolce & Gabbana have found their ideal poster boy (literally) in David Gandy, who’s starred in many of the label’s menswear campaigns and runway shows. They’re now cementing their affection for the British-born model with a new book dedicated only to pictures of him—the first they’ve ever done focusing on a single model. [Vogue U.K.]

Next up for the Standard: its own airline. André Balazs’ do-no-wrong hotel group has launched its own mini plane service, StndAIR, offering flights to the Hamptons in a plane painted the Standard’s own cherry red. Here’s hoping for a liftoff from the Boom Boom. [W]

And Lindsay Lohan takes on her latest role: art star? The troubled actress gets in front of the lens for a short film—the first—by artist Richard Phillips, who’s no stranger to celebrity portraiture. [T]

Photo: stndair.com