Style.com

August 28 2014

styledotcom Can Luella and Katie sustain the Marc by Marc excitement? stylem.ag/1qKTQOk pic.twitter.com/a0QKhvFHMJ

Subscribe to Style Magazine
51 posts tagged "Barneys New York"

Her Family Is Famous For Diamonds, But Gaia Repossi Is More Inspired By A Feather Through The Nose

-------


In recent years, the jewelry house of Repossi—founded in 1925 and nearing its 90th birthday—has won over a whole new generation of fans. Credit goes to Gaia Repossi, the 26-year-old artistic director, who took over her father’s post in 2007 and quickly introduced her own style as well as collaborations with friends like Joseph Altuzarra and Alexander Wang. (Her pieces made Style.com’s Top 10 Jewels list for Spring and Fall 2012.) All this despite protests that she’d never enter the family trade. “I was very intellectual, in my little own world,” Repossi said on a recent visit to New York to toast her ongoing partnership with Barneys. “I rejected completely the jewelry world.” But after studying painting, anthropology, and archaeology, Repossi edged into the business by the side door, as it were—she initially wanted to focus on its image and marketing—and wound up giving it a timely overhaul. “I wanted to bring it closer to what jewelry is nowadays to me,” she says, “and maybe also what jewelry was missing.” She spoke to Style.com about her work, her studies, and her art. For the record, she still paints.

Tell me a little bit about your background, and how you came to work for the family business.
It’s a little bit unexpected, even if it seems expected. When you grow up you can have two reactions: You can be very keen on what your parents are doing, or you want to look for something else. I was absolutely not willing to continue to work as my dad did [at Repossi]; I strictly wanted to do something different. I was painting as a teenager and I was aiming to really focus on that as my career. I started studying painting and I finished doing archeology, because I wanted to go more in the past, in the civilizations and the history of art. In the meantime, while I was in Paris studying, I saw a few things I didn’t like in my dad’s image of the company that I wanted to touch. Slowly it came out, the idea to launch a collection. And it worked, without even thinking about it. Unconsciously all my studies and my own imaginary world started applying to jewelry.

For example…?
It’s like, you go to India and see the nomads with garlands of silver things that they consider cheap, but they are extremely elegant. Nowadays, women don’t know how to wear the jewelry anymore, but when you go in India, there’s people barefoot but they are extremely elegant with all their jewelry. There are some codes, there’s an aesthetic that inspires me and has me working, a lot more than this [European] lady with her beautiful diamonds, even if she is elegant. It’s more that those silhouettes are striking. In Africa too—in Congo with their combs, and in Amazonia with their feathers in their nose.

Your anthropology courses proved to be good training.
Exactly. I was studying anthropology—ethnic similarities in between the civilizations. Even in those classes, jewelry became very important. Sculpture, too. When I go to shows, they have patterns, it’s the same. [But you also need] the family and the background that knows how it do it in a very refined way, because there’s no point to making a sculpture [for jewelry]—it has to be wearable and refined, not a heavy object you don’t know what to do with. Continue Reading “Her Family Is Famous For Diamonds, But Gaia Repossi Is More Inspired By A Feather Through The Nose” »

Now Trendabl

-------

Think Instagram, designed with the fashion set in mind—that’s what Trendabl, a new interactive iPhone app launching today, aims to be. Though the app is available to everyone, Trendabl founder and CEO Jon Alagem designed it with fashion editors, stylists, celebrities, designers, bloggers, etc. in mind. For the launch, Alagem enlisted a high-profile group of tastemakers and brands, including Mary-Kate Olsen, Ashley Olsen, Harley Viera-Newton, Brad Goreski, Diane von Furstenberg, Equipment, and Barneys New York, to contribute. How it works: Snap pictures on your iPhone, and using Trendabl, you can edit the photos, post captions, tag the pictures with the product and retail info, and share it with the app’s community. The result is a new social media platform to exchange trends and express personal style.

“We wanted to create a visually beautiful social media platform that allows users to share and discover the latest trends in fashion,” Alagem tells Style.com. “It was important to us to create an environment that encourages conversation between users, friends, brands, and tastemakers. Fashion has always been about showing off your style and that’s what we aim to accomplish.”

Before the app’s debut today, a few of Trendabl’s famous contributors shared their picks exclusively with Style.com. “Look 11 from men’s Givenchy Spring ’12. The imagination and workmanship behind this suit is the reason why I love fashion. This look is perfection to me,” says Goreski. From Viera-Newton: “My two favorite new accessories for Spring ’12. Gold Tom Binns Last Laugh Shark Cuff and white gold Alison Lou Happy/Sad studs [pictured, below].” The Barneys crew also has studs on the mind—they said they are still stuck on the Chloé Susan studded ankle boot. To get the full experience and see what fashion insiders are loving right now, download the app for free on iTunes. As for what’s to come from Trendabl? Alagem reports that he’s planning a Web site and e-commerce in the future.

Photos: Courtesy Photos

Around The World With Maiyet

-------

“We literally sat in the back of some man’s house and workshop in Kenya, with Silly Putty, making molds to show the artisans how to make this bracelet,” Maiyet president Kristy Caylor (pictured, right) told Style.com last night at the brand’s fête to celebrate its exclusive launch at Barneys. As she held up a sleek gold cuff, she explained, “The first time the bracelet came back, it looked nothing like this. The second time, it looked nothing like this. By the third time it was close, and by the fourth time it was beautiful. They came out with this huge smile on their faces when they knew they had finally achieved what we had asked for.”

Caylor, along with the brand’s co-founder Paul van Zyl (pictured, left) and creative director Gabriella Zanzani, shared similarly endearing stories about the making of Maiyet and their partnership with artisans in South Africa, Kenya, Indonesia, India, and more throughout the dinner portion of the night. Among those seated at the Fred’s feast, prepared by chef Floyd Cardoz, was Christina Ricci (pictured, center), this year’s Nobel Peace Prize winner Leymah Gbowee, Princess Khaliya Aga Khan, and Barneys’ Mark Lee. “I wish I had known who she [Gbowee] was in the elevator—I had no idea I was in the presence of greatness,” one female guest said as she sat down to the table.

Nearby, Ricci, who was dressed in head-to-toe Maiyet, told Style.com, “At first, I just looked at the designs and thought they were beautiful, and then hearing the concept behind the whole company, I thought it was really amazing.” Meanwhile, at the other end of the lucite table, wine glasses were breaking left and right as they fell into the water-filled moat running down the middle. “It’s still early in the night and people are already throwing glasses around,” joked van Zyl. “Well, as long as Lori Goldstein is OK, the evening can proceed,” he told the group as he looked at Goldstein, who was sitting directly to his right. Though Ricci had to head out after a few bites of her banana leaf-wrapped halibut (early-morning rehearsals for her off-Broadway performance in A Midsummer Night’s Dream called), the rest of the guests continued on through the Indian vanilla bean kulfi (well, assuming they didn’t lose their dessert silverware to the moat).

Photo: Joe Schildhorn / BFAnyc.com

Brooks Departs From Barneys

-------

Amanda Brooks, who joined Barneys New York early last year, has resigned from her post as the retailer’s vice president and fashion director. She has announced she will be moving to England with her family: “I have had the pleasure of working with an incredibly talented team but have resigned to temporarily relocate to England with my husband [Christopher Brooks] and children in the interest of further pursuing other opportunities. It is a personal decision and I will miss working with the Barneys team,” Brooks tells WWD.

Brooks, who was previously at William Morris Endeavor Entertainment as director of fashion, was brought onto the Barneys team as part of CEO Mark Lee’s overhaul of the creative leadership for the retailer. WWD reports that the Barneys is not planning to replace Brooks immediately.

Photo: David X. Prutting / BFAnyc.com

The Making of Maiyet

-------

Introducing: Maiyet, a conscious-clothing label that’s similar in ethos to Edun but with an even more luxe sophistication (and price point). Though the brand officially launched for Spring ’12 in Paris, Maiyet’s founders—former human rights lawyer Paul van Zyl, former Band of Outsiders president Kristy Caylor, and Daniel Lubetzky—are celebrating the label’s exclusive arrival at Barneys New York stores this week. The collection ($595–$2,400) of military coats, simple blouses, dresses, and jewelry is so sleek shoppers might be oblivious to the fact that it’s the work of hand-block printers in Jaipur or metalsmiths outside Nairobi. How it works: Maiyet and its design team (a group that hails from the likes of Celine, Calvin Klein, and Ralph Lauren) partners with local artisans in countries around the globe to promote self-sufficiency and entrepreneurship in developing economies. A portion of the profits then goes into training and development. Here, in this Style.com exclusive video (below), a look at the artisans at work on the collection.

Photo: Courtesy of Maiyet