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August 20 2014

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96 posts tagged "Barneys"

Jennifer Meyer Gets Personal

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“I believe, by definition, that jewelry is a very personal thing,” Jennifer Meyer says. That sentiment is apparent in the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund runner-up’s new collection of diamond-and-gold arrow and custom-engraved ID cuffs, which launches this week exclusively at Barneys. While accompanying husband Tobey Maguire to the Sydney set of The Great Gatsby last year, the designer was influenced by the statement baubles that star Carey Mulligan wore with her costumes. “There was an abundance of beautiful classic pieces with a touch of personalization,” she said. “You could tell a lot of thought went into the characters and what they wore.”

Meyer, who has been nominated for this year’s Swarovski Award for Accessory Design, describes the new range as classic with an edge. “I just started with a trillion diamonds and custom-cut stones,” the L.A.-based designer says of the wares, which reference the Chrysler Building. While remaining true to her West Coast roots, Meyer’s trajectory has been deliberate, developing her identity while still tending to her collection with a delicate hand. As for her future plans, she tells Style.com, “I am continuing to love working with custom-cut stones and adding bigger, bolder pieces into the collection.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

Christine Quinn Addresses the Fashion Set

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Cosmopolitan editor Joanna Coles invited Derek Lam, Rachel Roy, Steven Kolb, Barneys’ Mark Lee and Daniela Vitale, and about fifty other fashion insiders to lunch in the Hearst Tower to meet New York mayoral candidate Christine Quinn yesterday. By way of introduction, Coles earned a few laughs when she said, “I’d like to tell you what Christine would do as mayor, or rather, what she wouldn’t do. She would never take a picture of her crotch and send it to someone in the Midwest whom she’s never met, and then blame her computer for being hacked. I just want you to be reassured that that is not something Christine would do.” The Cosmo chief, of course, was referring to Anthony Weiner, the scandalized former congressman, who is testing the waters for a mayoral run of his own. During a long question-and-answer period, Quinn was quick to repeat an earlier statement that “whatever the next decision is for Congress member Weiner and his family, it’s a decision that they’ll have to make together, and I wish them well whatever decision they make,” and to point out that none of her rivals have the credentials that she does.

“It’s easy to criticize and issue press releases,” she said. “It’s much harder to deliver tangible results. If you look at my record, whether that’s working with the Brooklyn Navy Yard to bring more manufacturing jobs during the recession, or passing more legislation than any other City Council has to protect New York City’s tenants, or whether it’s working with the mayor to create the most comprehensive network of incubators to facilitate jobs in all different sectors, or passing the most comprehensive green building code of any city in America, I have a record of results that none of my opponents can touch.”

Quinn touched on topics such as crime reduction, the expansion of affordable housing, tourism, and public education, as well as the city’s first Design Week, scheduled for next month. “In all five boroughs, we’ll highlight 40,000-plus designers of all types,” she said. “We’re doing it, one, to say that we’re better than anywhere else, let me be perfectly clear; two, to thank the design industry; and three, hopefully to bring more attention to it, so we can bring more jobs to it.” She also got into the nitty-gritty about the Garment Center, a subject close to her audience’s heart, suggesting her Small Manufacturing Incentive Fund model might be a good fit.

As for what Quinn wore, she said, “A New York designer, Elie Tahari, an Alexis Bittar bracelet, David Yurman necklace, and earrings I bought in Sag Harbor from a guy named Lee.”

Photo: Patrick McMullan

Minnie’s All Dressed Up

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Following the release of Barneys’ 2012 Electric Holiday film, an animated short that starred tall and skinny Disney characters wearing designer duds (Minnie in Lanvin, Goofy in Balmain, and Daisy in Dolce & Gabbana), the fashion biz took some heat for not portraying the iconic cartoons in their traditional proportions. Well, this weekend, in celebration of Disneyland Paris’ 20th anniversary, Alber Elbaz took a stab at a new Minnie Mouse ensemble. The lovable rodent stomped the runway in a custom purple embellished Lanvin frock and one of the designer’s Fall '13 Love necklaces. Needles to say, Ms. Mouse looked pretty sharp, and she didn’t have to lose a pound to do so. Other runway ensembles included a Cinderella-inspired knit skirt and top from London’s Sister by Sibling, and as well as enchanted wares from Custo Dalmau and Jean-Paul Knott. According to The Telegraph, some onlookers complained that they missed the polka dots. Elbaz offered, “We’re not here to transform people. We love her the way she is.”

Photo: Thibault Camus / AP Photo

Neuwirth’s Night In

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Last night, to celebrate Irene Neuwirth’s 2013 CFDA Fashion Award nomination for the Swarovski Accessories prize—her second consecutive nod in the category —Barneys New York CEO Mark Lee threw her a party. And when Mark Lee throws you a party, you know you’ve made it. “Barneys was my first account, about ten years ago—it’s the perfect home,” Neuwirth told Style.com. Speaking of perfect homes, Lee hosted the soiree in his swank Chelsea penthouse, replete with views due west to the Hudson and a luxe, quirky charm.

Neuwirth’s work, too, exudes opulence—yet with a bohemian spritz that’s often rare in the fine-jewelry business. Hyper-vivid color is her signature, from asymmetric starburst emerald earrings to chunky labradorite-and-rose-gold-disk rings to lapis-studded bangles—all trimmed with diamonds. “I love Mexican fire opals,” laughed the designer when pressed as to her favorite gemstone. “When you think of fine jewelry, you think of pieces that can be passed down forever, which I still want for my collection—but in a more colorful, creative, and artistic way,” she added.

“She’s way high up on the totem,” said Lee. “She’s built something really significant. We love Irene.” Given the fete’s friendly feel, not to mention the turnout (Allison Williams, Stefano Tonchi, Kate Lanphear, and Wes Gordon were all in attendance), we’d say Lee’s sentiment is the general consensus.

Photo: Billy Farrell/ BFAnyc.com

Reece Hudson’s Virtual Expansion

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Reece Hudson, the New York-based handbag and accessories label founded by Reece Solomon and her business partner, Max Stein, in 2009, is on a roll. The brand has experienced some serious success since it earned a coveted spot in the CFDA’s Fashion Incubator program in 2011. Evidence? Spring 2013 saw the range launch in major retailers like Barneys New York and Shopbop.com. In an effort to meet bigger orders and up its leather quality, the brand has, for the past two seasons, been manufacturing its clever clutches, totes, and satchels in Italy. And the duo has even begun to conquer key international markets—come Fall ’13, it will land in China and Russia. Today, Solomon and Stein (who are actually just back from a CFDA/W Hotels-sponsored inspiration trip in Istanbul), announced the debut of Reece Hudson’s new Web site, which marks the brand’s first foray into e-commerce. “We only do two collections per year, so stores are selling out of things in thirty or forty-five days, and then there’s nothing available,” said Stein, explaining that he and Solomon hope the e-commerce portion of their Web site (which will be accessible to clients worldwide) will help fill the ’tween-season gap. The new online destination will also offer special pieces that aren’t often available at larger retailers.

In addition to e-shopping, Reece Hudson’s virtual home features fashion films, behind-the-scenes snaps, a full collections archive, and more. “One thing we’ve been working on a lot with our mentors since being in the Incubator is building a defined brand image,” said Solomon. The Web site, which the designer describes as “simple and clean,” is the pair’s next step in expanding and defining the growing label. Check out the brand’s new online digs at reecehudson.com.

Photo: Courtesy of Reece Hudson