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April 24 2014

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7 posts tagged "Behind-the-Scenesters"

Behind-The-Scenesters: Mary Howard

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Designers design. Photographers photograph. Models model. That much—in broad strokes, at least—is clear. But what about the artists, technicians, and industry insiders, often unpublicized and underappreciated, who help to get clothes and accessories made and shown? Call them Behind-the-Scenesters: people who shape our experience of fashion but never take a bow on the catwalk or strike a pose for the camera. Without them—from pattern-makers to production designers—the show wouldn’t go on. And in a new series, Style.com sits down with a few of these pros to find out, basically, what they do.

Mary Howard is the set designer on virtually every key fashion photographer’s speed dial. She’s the consummate background professional, literally—she creates the mise-en-scène of a shoot. Howard (left works regularly with Steven Meisel, Annie Leibovitz, and Steven Klein, among others, and her sets range as widely as her collaborators’ styles. She does dazzlingly elaborate (Leibovitz’s 2008 Wizard of Oz shoot starring Keira Knightley), and she can make a set virtually invisible, too (Meisel’s Spring ’10 Prada campaign.) On any given day, you can find Howard mottling the gray backdrop at a studio shoot or packing up a selection of Art Deco lamps headed off on location. Here, she talks to Style.com about working with the masters, how much stuff is too much stuff, and learning when to leave the bobby pins in.

So, Mary: In one sentence, what do you do?
I call myself a set designer for print. Could be editorial, could be ads. In movies, they call someone like me a production designer; in fashion, the name “set designer” has stuck but it doesn’t entirely describe the job. There’s a lot of art direction involved; it’s not just about picking out a rug. But I guess if I have to boil down my job description to one sentence, I’d say—I create the world around the girl. I don’t have anything to do with the model, but I shape the physical environment that surrounds her and help the photographer and the stylist and everyone else involved with the shoot tell the right story and make the girl pop.

Why do you think the fashion industry has shied away from the title “production designer”?
I think some of it has to do with the fact that this is still an emerging field. It barely existed when I moved to New York; it wasn’t until recently that my studio even began getting credits in magazine. I work quite a bit with Grace Coddington at Vogue, and she’ll tell stories about sending her assistants out to just, you know, grab a chair. Or the photographer would send his assistant out to pick up props.

How did you get into set design?
I grew up in New Orleans, and after I got my MFA, I went back down there to build Mardi Gras floats. Then I came to New York City and built floats for the Macy’s parade. I was always making things—I’d make props for Saturday Night Live, for instance. Eventually I began working with a set designer—this was about 20 years ago, and it’s possible that she was the only one. We began working with Richard Avedon, and that led to other photographers and editors seeking us out. Then I went out on my own. Honestly, I feel like a grandma in this field.

What’s an average workday like for you?
I think that, like a lot of people in fashion, I do what I do because there isn’t really “an average day.” There are days on set, and there are prep days that involve a lot of thinking or researching or pounding the pavement looking at stuff. So there’s a routine, but the work itself is so dependent on the assignment—if I’m working with Annie, her process is totally different from, say, Steven Meisel’s process. Continue Reading “Behind-The-Scenesters: Mary Howard” »

Behind-The-Scenesters: Gayle Dizon

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Designers design. Photographers photograph. Models model. That much—in broad strokes, at least—is clear. But what about the artists, technicians, and industry insiders, often unpublicized and underappreciated, who help to get clothes and accessories made and shown? Call them Behind-the-Scenesters: people who shape our experience of fashion but never take a bow on the catwalk or strike a pose for the camera. Without them—from patternmakers to production designers—the show wouldn’t go on. And, in a new series, Style.com sits down with a few of these pros to find out, basically, what they do.

First up: Gayle Dizon (left), founder of event production company Dizon Inc. Dizon produces runway shows for Proenza Schouler, Thakoon, and Isaac Mizrahi, among others, and in so doing, she has a hand in everything from picking out venues and setting up lighting rigs to casting models and hiring the hair and makeup teams. Here, she talks to Style.com about the business of creating fashion shows, their trickle-down influence, and the most unsung staffers in the game.

So, Gayle: Broad strokes, what do you do?
Well, I produce fashion shows. My company does full-scale production, from the early stages of development of a collection to bringing in the talent that works on the shows to developing the creative inspiration for the look and feel of the show itself.

This must be downtime for you then, between seasons.
Ha. Not quite. I actually started my own company with the expectation that I’d be able to dip in and out and spend time with my family, but it hasn’t exactly worked out that way. We’re constantly working. I mean, we just wrapped up Resort, which has really turned into a third big season, and we’re way into the September shows and starting on next season, too. And my company works on things like store events and parties, too.

Hold on. You’re already starting work on the February 2011 shows? Have the designers even begun thinking about those collections?
Only just. But the way I like to work, I’m involved from the get-go. Like, Proenza—what we do is get together with Jack and Lazaro very early on so they can show us their research. They are very intensive researchers; I’ve always got a lot to bounce off of. So we’ll talk about palette and inspiration and look at all these varied sources they’re pulling from, and I bring back ideas. And then we go back and forth until showtime, pretty much. Continue Reading “Behind-The-Scenesters: Gayle Dizon” »