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August 1 2014

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3 posts tagged "Ben Kirchhoff"

A Cautionary Tale, By Meadham Kirchhoff

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Ed Meadham and Ben Kirchhoff are two designers who know how to deliver a real show on the runway. This season, the Meadham Kirchhoff recipe for success included parlor scene vignettes (custom-made by the team at de Gournay), cupcakes, lavish bouquets of flowers, and clothes injected with a dash of nostalgia and glamour. Here, Style.com shares an exclusive video from the show. “There is something so exclusive and privileged about catwalk shows, and we try to make them an intimate experience for the audience,” the design duo tells Style.com. “The film should be a reflection of that moment.” Watch that moment come to life in the video above.

Exclusive: Meadham Kirchhoff Spring ’13 Preview

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Ed Meadham and Ben Kirchhoff’s Fall collection was rainbow-hued and full of sparkle, a look they said was inspired by a club they wanted to go to, if only it existed. For Spring, it appears the element of fantasy is still strongly intact. The Meadham Kirchhoff designers gave Style.com an exclusive preview of what is to come at their London show tomorrow, and Meadham’s sketch is pictured above. “I wanted this collection to take me as far away as possible from my own reality, and in particular from Dalston,” he says. “It’s about the dream of escape. It is a fantasy of opulence, decadence, glamour, and wealth.” Check back tomorrow to see the full collection and our review.

Photo: Courtesy of Meadham Kirchhoff

Letter From London:
The Men’s Collections, Day 3

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London’s final day of shows featured outings from J.W. Anderson, Margaret Howell, Pringle of Scotland, and Christopher Raeburn. It also offered a moment to check out the installations from Fashion East, Lulu Kennedy’s young-gun incubator of emerging talent. Tim Blanks took a tour.


Ben Kirchhoff went back to his London roots with Meadham Kirchhoff’s first collection for men (pictured), not only because he started out with menswear in his pre-Meadham days at Saint Martins but also because, when he first arrived in London, he lived in a squat in the general neighborhood of the imposing Georgian mansion where the duo showed their new work. So that glorious vista of green trees and blue sky (yes, the sun shone for a moment) had once been his. And so had the pell-mell, headily fragranced tumble of clothes, boys, flowers, and skip-surfed remnants with which MK filled the eighteenth-century salons. They’re now a fully fledged cult. The cultists were scarcely disappointed, but anyone else who’s been wondering what might be in the pipeline after the suited, booted sartorial conservatism that many of the fashion boys have been working over the past three days might also catch a glimpse of a possible future in MK’s extravagant wrack of the West.

They were sharing the house with the latest crop of designers that Lulu Kennedy was introducing to the world under the Fashion East banner. Downstairs, Duffy showed his silver jewelry with its occult undertones in a room that could have been built for that purpose alone. And Craig Green, fresh out of Saint Martins, showed eerie, homespun clothes—in calico, cheesecloth, cotton knit, and suede screen-printed to a crunchy finish—which suggested ancient rituals in pagan communities cut off from the world. The Wicker Man was an inspiration. No surprises there.

Ritual also infused Tom Lipop’s tailoring with a colorful Mexican twist, or at least the Day of the Dead did, because his models were made up as leering skulls. The boys were packed away on shelves and in drawers, a memorable way to guarantee maximal impact on a minimal budget. Kit Neale managed the same effect by filling his space with a huge fairground snake, which complemented his extravagant prints (particularly liked the lobster ensemble). Idiosyncrasy, playfulness, and obsession rule in the universe of Fashion East. Marten van der Horst’s heavy-metal mutant T-shirts had all that.

Photo: Courtesy of Meadham Kirchoff