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July 10 2014

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15 posts tagged "Berlin Fashion Week"

Berlin Fashion Week Kicks Off, Sans Boss

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Kilian Kerner Show - Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2015The schedule for Berlin fashion week Spring/Summer 2015 may lack extravaganzas like the stadium-sized picnic and all-night party that Boss Orange hosted for Spring 2010, but a number of smaller, local designers are stepping into the breach.

Instead of occupying the historic but cramped Brandenburg Gate and Bebelplatz sites, which World Cup festivities have taken over just now, Berlin fashion week resides happily in the Erika-Hess-Eisstadion. This vast, open-air ice rink from the sixties has been converted into a breezy main tent. The local German designers, such as Lena Hoschek and Michael Sontag, as well as visitors from emerging fashion cities including a showcase of African designers, presented sensible but still compelling collections.

The evident outliner was Kilian Kerner (pictured, left), a designer who grew up with Berlin fashion week itself. This is Kerner’s tenth BFW season, and he has ripened into a designer whose garments gracefully fill the space left by labels like Boss. Kerner always cites music and club culture as his muse. In his early days, he reveled in silver PVC jeans, slinky Lurex dresses, and shimmering striped zoot suits.

Kerner’s chic Spring 2015 collection is too pretty, light, and precious to hide in a dark club. For women, he assembled floating fabrics in sorbet shades, with a subtle seventies-inspired silhouette, clusters of gold beading, and light layers of quilted silk. His men paid explicit homage to his origins by wearing shirts, briefs, and a full suit made from a print featuring a stained-glass window with Rihanna, Bowie, and Justin Bieber enshrined as saints. With Kerner’s new relaxed cuts and premium fabrics, these pieces were a solid start to a more grown-up Berlin fashion week.

Photo: Frazer Harrison / Getty Images

Berlin Fashion Week’s Fine Print

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Berlin fashion week

As a writer, it was nice to see that the leading Fall ’14 trends during Berlin fashion week were homages to old-fashioned printed words and images. Almost every main show included black-and-white outfits with patterned sections containing actual lettering or imagery that could have been lifted from a newspaper page. Lala Berlin combined panels of pretty white silk and black lace, and pinned signs expounding the virtues of being wild but nice on the backs of its casually structured blazers and flowing coats. Marc Cain adorned a pencil skirt with a vintage New York Times photo of the Williamsburg Bridge. Hien Le, meanwhile, sent out black-and-white egg-shaped wool dresses, knee-length skirts, and boxy blazers for her, and matching sweaters that resembled an illustrator’s charcoal shading paper for him. [ep_anouí] by Eva Poleschinski presented white leather tulip skirts paired with chiffon blouses covered in cursive black scrawl (including a coded charcoal love note to Cy Twombly). Vladimir Karaleev’s graceful, oragami-esque folds of cream-colored felt and silk could have been a frustrated writer’s crumpled blank page. As for the reportage that writers would broadcast about fabric, the big buzz was the appearance of Elizabeth Hurley wearing—hold the presses—black leather leggings and a white top with Morse code-like dots.

For a behind-the-scenes look at Berlin Fashion Week’s street style, parties, and beyond, click through our slideshow.

Photo: Courtesy Photos

Berlin Fashion Week Comes to a Close

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Throughout Berlin fashion week, Alonso Dominguez will report back on the best and brightest shows. To view our complete coverage, click here.

Day 4:
The last day of Berlin fashion week kicked off with Issever Bahri (left)—a young label (founded in 2010) designed by German-Turkish duo Derya Issever and Cimen Bachri. For Fall ’13, the pair put forth a minimal, neutral collection of long silk shirts and oversize knits. These were worn with black leather trousers and short skirts in wool velvet. Demure dresses brought a youthful femininity to the collection.

Over at Vladimir Karaleev, deconstruction was the name of the game. The conceptual designer sent men and women in unfinished gabardine, wool, and rubber garments down his runway. Key looks included a cream woven sweater with a mesh detail that exposed the model’s torso and a cropped see-through-plastic electric blue jacket with faux-fur sleeves.

At Dawid Tomaszewski, one of the most anticipated shows of the week, there were smoky-eyed models wearing sculptural black and dark gray looks in leather and silk. Applications like rubber patches on tights and copper-colored metallic belts and cummerbunds gave the collection a futuristic feel, while baded embroidery and carefully tailored jackets and capes were evidence of the designer’s attention to detail.

Michael Michalsky’s show—the last of the evening—was held at an off-site location. For men, there were rolled-up trousers, dark blazers, and leather jackets. Illustrator Bendix Bauer designed Michalsky’s custom Fall print, which appeared on trousers, shirts, and a suit. For the ladies, the designer showed long silk and lace dresses and skirts paired with thick coats, dark blazers, or sequined jackets. Mini polka dots covered aqua blouses and long skirts, and the black chiffon finale gown—nipped at the waist with a bowed belt—closed the show (and for that matter, Berlin fashion week) with a flash of drama.

Continue Reading “Berlin Fashion Week Comes to a Close” »

Germany’s Next Top Models?

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Is the Schwarz-Rot-Gold having a fashion moment? The answer may be yes. Germany’s Jil Sander returns to the women’s runway this Saturday in Milan. This season’s Berlin fashion week was stronger than ever, and German models new and returning ruled the catwalks. There seems to be no stopping Kati Nescher (left, in Stephan Schneider), who stomped her way through a very successful New York season. So did Toni Garrn, a Calvin Klein exclusive lo these many years ago and still working steadily today; she secured the opening spot at Ralph Lauren. If German fashion is on the rise, it’s hard to think of a better outlet to celebrate it than Achtung Mode. The magazine’s Markus Ebner—who recently weighed in on the Raf/Hedi debate for Style.com—paid tribute to his countrymen and women’s designs, modeled by Germans Nescher, Antonia Wesseloh, and new Calvin Klein discovery Thorben Gärtner, in a new story shot by Markus Pritzi on location in Berlin and Paris.

Photo: Markus Pritzi/Courtesy of Achtung Mode

A More Mature Turn At Berlin Fashion Week

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Mercedes-Benz Berlin Fashion Week is under way in the German capital. All week, reporter Hili Perlson will be sending back dispatches from the scene.

Day two of Berlin’s fashion week saw a change in direction, with many of the labels sending more mature and subtle creations down the runway, compared to the previous day. Black and white combinations ruled the palette, often with a minty pastel green or a bright tangerine for contrast.

Hugo by Hugo Boss (pictured) transformed an ice skating rink into a catwalk. White carpet replaced the ice, much to the chagrin of guests—including Kate Bosworth, Jessica Joffe, and China Chow—hoping for a break from the heat wave. The womenswear included A-line dresses with a below-the-knee cut, worn with geometric tops that gave the silhouette a futuristic look. Asymmetric shoulders made a big return at Hugo, accentuated with thin strips in a reflective metallic material. On the menswear front, standout pieces were a two-tone suit in black and white, with electric blue and red that melted on the border, and a playful suit jacket/blouson combination.

The collection of rising star Michael Sontag (a favorite of Vogue Germany editor in chief Christiane Arp) showed a strong development of the designer’s aesthetic, which is characterized by a special ability to do very feminine cuts without going über-femme. Extra fabric lining the contours on pants created a trompe l’oeil effect of round skirts and transformed tops into light sculptured capes. The show’s highlight was a wide charcoal overcoat in rich natural silk.

Romanian designer Irina Schrotter closed the day. This season, Schrotter, whose career spans two decades, entrusted her label to young avant-garde designer Lucian Broscatean, who gave the line his signature smart elegance. High-slit dresses in sand, nude, sheer white, and pale pink made up the core of the collection, matched with pieces in tangerine and bronze. The accessories drew inspiration from the art of Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei, giving the clean looks a crafty touch.

Photo: Courtesy of Hugo by Hugo Boss