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July 13 2014

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17 posts tagged "Berlin Fashion Week"

Germany’s Next Top Models?

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Is the Schwarz-Rot-Gold having a fashion moment? The answer may be yes. Germany’s Jil Sander returns to the women’s runway this Saturday in Milan. This season’s Berlin fashion week was stronger than ever, and German models new and returning ruled the catwalks. There seems to be no stopping Kati Nescher (left, in Stephan Schneider), who stomped her way through a very successful New York season. So did Toni Garrn, a Calvin Klein exclusive lo these many years ago and still working steadily today; she secured the opening spot at Ralph Lauren. If German fashion is on the rise, it’s hard to think of a better outlet to celebrate it than Achtung Mode. The magazine’s Markus Ebner—who recently weighed in on the Raf/Hedi debate for Style.com—paid tribute to his countrymen and women’s designs, modeled by Germans Nescher, Antonia Wesseloh, and new Calvin Klein discovery Thorben Gärtner, in a new story shot by Markus Pritzi on location in Berlin and Paris.

Photo: Markus Pritzi/Courtesy of Achtung Mode

A More Mature Turn At Berlin Fashion Week

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Mercedes-Benz Berlin Fashion Week is under way in the German capital. All week, reporter Hili Perlson will be sending back dispatches from the scene.

Day two of Berlin’s fashion week saw a change in direction, with many of the labels sending more mature and subtle creations down the runway, compared to the previous day. Black and white combinations ruled the palette, often with a minty pastel green or a bright tangerine for contrast.

Hugo by Hugo Boss (pictured) transformed an ice skating rink into a catwalk. White carpet replaced the ice, much to the chagrin of guests—including Kate Bosworth, Jessica Joffe, and China Chow—hoping for a break from the heat wave. The womenswear included A-line dresses with a below-the-knee cut, worn with geometric tops that gave the silhouette a futuristic look. Asymmetric shoulders made a big return at Hugo, accentuated with thin strips in a reflective metallic material. On the menswear front, standout pieces were a two-tone suit in black and white, with electric blue and red that melted on the border, and a playful suit jacket/blouson combination.

The collection of rising star Michael Sontag (a favorite of Vogue Germany editor in chief Christiane Arp) showed a strong development of the designer’s aesthetic, which is characterized by a special ability to do very feminine cuts without going über-femme. Extra fabric lining the contours on pants created a trompe l’oeil effect of round skirts and transformed tops into light sculptured capes. The show’s highlight was a wide charcoal overcoat in rich natural silk.

Romanian designer Irina Schrotter closed the day. This season, Schrotter, whose career spans two decades, entrusted her label to young avant-garde designer Lucian Broscatean, who gave the line his signature smart elegance. High-slit dresses in sand, nude, sheer white, and pale pink made up the core of the collection, matched with pieces in tangerine and bronze. The accessories drew inspiration from the art of Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei, giving the clean looks a crafty touch.

Photo: Courtesy of Hugo by Hugo Boss

At Berlin Fashion Week, A Few Feathers, A Lot Of Leather

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Mercedes-Benz Berlin Fashion Week began yesterday in the German capital. All week, reporter Hili Perlson will be sending back dispatches from the scene.

Berlin fashion week has a new home this season, a few kilometers away from its former address. That makes it not only the first time that the shows will take place in the former West, but also that it’s sharing real estate with the Siegsäule, the nineteenth-century Victory Column that was also ground zero for the legendary Love Parade. The electronica-and-more fest wasn’t known for its high fashion cred—it gave rise to more than a few bizarre looks—but it inspired some utterly creative getups in its heyday nevertheless.

Still, the shows at Berlin were more fashion than festival. Escada Sport opened the season with a breezy Spring 2013 collection of light knits and embroidered pieces that mixed a hot summer Cancun getaway with Berlin cool. At the end of the show, it was a lamb leather T-shirt worn with matching pants that had showgoers buzzing.

The contrast to Augustin Teboul’s presentation could hardly be starker. The visionary German-French duo showed an all-black collection of sheer fabrics and leather, inspired by Baudelaire’s Les fleurs du mal, offsite in a grand West Berlin apartment, where the models were set within cavernous flower arrangements.

Dawid Tomaszewski took things in a more avant-garde direction, sending alienlike models down the runway wearing futuristic jackets and laser-cut dresses made of high-tech materials, styled with feathers held in place by a mouthpiece (pictured, right). The collection of gravity-defying tops and rubber leggings was aptly entitled Metamorphosis and was inspired by the landscape of Portugal, though save for the Fado soundtrack, the collection evoked Asia Minor more than Iberian Peninsula.

Kaviar Gauche, one of the city’s strongest brands, closed out the first day, showing its signature ultra-feminine and always wearable looks, this time in shades of yellow, mustard, ocher, and black (pictured, left).

Photos: Samir Hussein / Getty Images

In Berlin, The Catwalk’s Just One More Gallery Space

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At Berlin’s Fall ’12 fashion week, just wrapped in the German capital, the city’s status as a European art hub was front and center. It was no accident that the largest hometown brand, HUGO, chose the Old Masters’ Museum as the venue to host its star-studded runway show and party, inspired by “surreal nostalgia” and “theater,” and incorporating recent runway trends like Art Deco graphicism and bodycon cuts inspired by athletic wear. And heat was generated by the young design talents who the city has been incubating. On the less-established front, a handful of Berlin’s “ones to watch” ripened this season with strong shows demonstrating the maturity of their concepts and skills. The best collections embodied the gritty “considered chaos” aesthetic which artists Jonathan Messe, Zhivago Duncan (Michael Milchasky’s collaborator this season) and Kirstine Roepstorff have made into Berlin’s signature creative style.

Along with the sleek sexuality of artists’ favorite DSTM (Don’t Shoot the Messengers), Juliaandben are Berlin’s best bridge between fashion and art. Designer Ben Klunker owned a gallery before he decided to devote himself completely to his collaboration with Julia Heuse. Their tie-dyed pieces used the old bathtub-dyeing technique favored by hippies and adolescents to create a fresh form of city-chic: leggings and dresses that look grungy but are gracefully cut. You could see them slinking off the presentation stage into Berlin’s studios, cafés, openings, and gritty after-opening bars.

Equally expressive of Berlin’s art scene is Vladimir Karaleev’s polished collection of black and Yves Klein-blue draped dresses and coats, in layers of worsted wool, mohair, silk and cotton. The Bulgarian-born Berliner debuted in 2007 when his show culminated in a gown made of twenty interlocking T-shirt fabrics hand-stitched, braided and tied together. Since then, his hand-sewn, abstractly attached and intentionally ragged clothes have inspired appreciation for his aesthetic but not sufficient confidence in their craftsmanship. This time, his collection gracefully balanced reassuring core construction with de-constructed details, in which elegant subtle black leather, artfully interwoven blue mohair and yellows, oranges and tans highlighted well-assembled stitching.

Photo: Courtesy of Mercedes-Benz Berlin Fashion Week

A Berlin Blowout, Courtesy of Hugo Boss

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There’s something to be said for the home-field advantage. When Hugo Boss-—based in Germany—elected to show its Hugo collection at Berlin fashion week, they went for broke, inviting 1,000 guests (including Hilary Swank, Eric Bana, and Ryan Kwanten) for a fashion show, dinner, and party at the Museum Island in the city’s center. Designer Eyan Allen looked back to the future for Spring. He called the collection Poetic Tailoring, but he seemed more to be channeling Star Trek with the sharp, clean lines, and stark palette of starship silver, glacial blue, white, and flame red. Silver lamé leggings and flowing dresses over second-skin white trousers gave a hint of the sixties.

Afterward, the catwalkers of today had no trouble imagining themselves in the goods. Georgia May Jagger, wearing a dress and lipstick in the same arresting red shown on the catwalk, cooed with Leah Woods over a sharp pantsuit worn by Jourdan Dunn. They both congratulated Allen on his bracing palette, too. A different opinion came from a model old enough to remember the sixties the first time around: Veruschka. “I love that Hugo’s clothes are wearable,” she said. “But I would rather wear the menswear, especially the apronlike coverall jackets, because I can’t see many men wearing them and someone should. I especially love how Hugo reduces it to one strong color, whether ice, silver or red. But really, I mostly wear what I bought 30 years ago. When something is strong, it stays worth keeping.” Or, you might say, reinterpreting.

Photo: Courtesy of Hugo