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July 25 2014

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12 posts tagged "Boucheron"

Everything You Need to Know About Fall ’14′s Hautest Jewelry

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In the run-up to September’s Biennale des Antiquaires—arguably the most important event on the jewelry calendar—there is much muchness being showcased in and around the Place Vendôme. But while big may be beautiful and jaw-dropping, some of the season’s most compelling pieces, such as “floating” stones and unexpected 3-D effects, prove that less can still be more. Below, we tell you everything you need to know about the hautest of this season’s fine jewelry.

A Fine JewelA Fine Jewel: A champion of couture with parsimony, Emmanuel Aubry decided to “turn water to ice” by mounting a 47-carat rectangular cabochon atop a mirror in a white-gold cage setting called the Riva, in homage to the boat. By the time you read this, the one-of-a-kind Riva will have likely vaporized. (It happens to be the least bank-breaking bauble of the week.) Fortunately, Aubry has other aquas to freeze and plenty of other stones where “things are happening.”

BoucheronBoucheron: Japan, Russia, India, China, and Persia offered up a whirlwind world tour of inspirations, among them a Bolshoi-informed diamond necklace that can become a tiara: the Trésor de Perse necklace in diamonds, rock crystal, and two cabochon sapphires including one that once belonged to the shah of Iran and a 190-carat engraved emerald that belonged to a 17th-century maharajah. “It’s all about the majesty of the stones,” commented creative director Claire Choisne. “There’s no need for complexity. I try to stay as invisible as possible and keep it simple.”

BuccellatiBuccellati: Every two years, Buccellati focuses on a single object. This year, it’s Bracelets de Rêves. Forty unique variations on house signatures by Andrea Buccellati feature baroque flourishes set into a silky, textured background known as rigato, a proprietary technique, or gold honeycomb lace. The dazzling diamond-, sapphire-, and tsavorite-encrusted cuff was two years in the making. The house is also quietly turning out unexpected pieces, such as gold and diamond iPad and phone covers.

BulgariBulgari: Stones talk. Lucia Silvestri has spent her life listening to them for Bulgari, but even she can’t quite explain how she does it. That’s why she decided to whittle 4 carats off her favorite stone in the collection: a Burmese sapphire. The 58-carat cabochon anchors one of the nine creations in the Musa collection. Overall, candy-colored stones with irregular shapes and bezel settings take pride of place. (Silvestri affectionately calls one necklace “The Flintstone.”) High-jewelry serpentis mark the house’s 130th anniversary.

ChanelChanel: In a departure, Chanel tapped into the explosive creative freedom of café society and shook loose of strictly figurative codes. What camellias and stars remained got the abstract treatment, as graphic relief on the supple, 3-D Sunset necklace heavy with padparadscha sapphires and diamonds. Elsewhere, the house ventured into gold with red enamel on an openwork bracelet set with diamonds and yellow sapphires. Another showstopper: the Broadway bracelet set with 35 carats’ worth of baguette, brilliant, and square-cut diamonds.

Cindy ChaoCindy Chao: Cindy Chao dances on the line between jewelry and art objects. This year’s centerpiece was the much-talked about 10th anniversary Ballerina Butterfly, a collaboration with Sarah Jessica Parker that will be auctioned to benefit the New York City Ballet in October. Elsewhere, the designer continued her tribute to nature and the four seasons, which most recently included sculptural orchid earrings wrought in 3-D with large sapphires and diamonds on all sides of the piece.

DauphinDauphin: Charlotte de La Rochefoucauld is exploring a “blue period” with her nascent jewelry line. Her latest pieces include a boule ring based on her minimalist cuff, which are both done in black diamonds on palladium gold with a midnight blue cast that changes depending on the light. The cuff is also offered in black, gray, and white ombré diamonds and, come September, in rose gold, a special edition for Le Bon Marché. The designer has also spun out her Eiffel-esque design into a significant diamond-set signet ring.

DiorDior: Of the twenty-one one-of-a-kind pieces in Victoire de Castellane’s ArchiDior high-jewelry collection, all but four had been snapped up by the middle of Couture week. Among the pieces inspired by Christian Dior’s creations from 1947 to early 1950 were the surprising Corolle Soir in pigeon’s blood rubies and diamonds, and the Envol ring, which echoes the dress by reprising a button detail with a significant emerald. There was also a hint of what’s to come in the other twenty-three pieces now being readied for the Biennale, with Plissée Verticale, a ribbon of diamonds ending in pear-cut emeralds.

Louis VuittonLouis Vuitton: Acte V signals the house’s fifth high-jewelry collection, and that key numeral-slash-letter is the springboard for pieces based on Gaston-Louis Vuitton’s tricolor monogram, sketchbooks, and 1925 Milano vanity set. A necklace with a nearly 88-carat Australian black opal was the headline act. But the talking points for many editors were smaller entries, such as the Deco-informed Apotheosis cuff and the hexagonal ring boasting diamonds, chrysoprase, and a hint of the seventies.

Repossi Repossi: We’re hearing a lot about “floating” stones this season, but no one did it quite like Gaia Repossi. “Just the stone is enough,” the designer noted of the delicately futuristic collection she called “set on empty.” One major statement was the ring with four yellow diamonds and one white in various shapes and sizes. “It’s big, but it’s camouflage big,” the designer offered. Also big and less camouflage-able were two Bauhaus-inspired cuffs in pink gold “tulle” and diamonds.

RezaReza: Olivier Reza doesn’t “do” themes. Fair enough: He has more stones than anyone. For the first time in fifteen years, Reza will show at the Biennale with a mix of about forty new pieces as well as some archival favorites, such as a pair of significant seventies-era drop earrings with two sapphires that together weigh 100 carats (that’s not counting the diamonds, plus they’re not for sale). Among the new wares are the Tremblant ruby and diamond earrings, and contemporary takes on the “toi et moi” with two stones set at close remove.

WilfredoWilfredo Rosado:As an assistant to Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat back in the eighties, Wilfredo Rosado discovered a passion for art that has followed him everywhere since. For this softer, lighter-colored collection, the designer looked to the work of Cy Twombly, notably his Alhambra period, for gems layered in the spirit of Moroccan mosaics. Two other groups, Bakkheia and Rapture, render the artist’s zigzags and scribbles in great swoops of white and colored diamonds.

VenyxVenyx: Natural phenomena, stars, and green lights fascinate Eugenie Niarchos. With her second collection, Theiya—a name that nods to the Greek goddess of sight, light, and shiny things in general—the designer offered another take on nature’s beauty in lightning bolt bracelets, Venyx stars (one branch is longer than the others), and a constellation of diamonds on an ear cuff called Lady Australis. Twin dusk and dawn pendants called Theiya Lumia were set with diamonds and moonstone or labradorite and a tiny piece of the Gibeon meteorite in back.

Photo: Courtesy Photos 

At Paris’ Haute Joaillerie Outings, a Twinkling Taste of What’s to Come

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This year, the January high jewelry presentations were but a prelude to the July Haute Couture season, which itself will be just a preview of what’s to come at the year’s biggest jewelry event: Paris’ twenty-seventh Biennale des Antiquaires in September. But even though most houses just offered a shimmering taste, indie brands and established houses alike gave us lots to lust for. Here, a roundup of the season’s most compelling gems.

Aurelie BiedermanAurélie Bidermann: Aurélie Bidermann’s quintessentially boho-chic personal style reflects the various places she’s lived since childhood—Paris, London, New York, and especially South America, with a nod to India for good measure. This multicolored sapphire and gold cuff with a tsavorite scarab detail headlines her debut foray into precious pieces. The designer’s much-anticipated collection spans colorful critter-shaped charms, a heavy elephant pendant, woven gold bracelets with diamond-lined edges, bangles that jingle, and medieval-inspired rings. We’re looking forward to seeing what fine-jewelry jungle the designer comes up with next.

BoucheronBoucheron: Believe it or not, it’s been a decade since Boucheron first launched its covetable Quatre rings. Now, offspring include an all-diamond variation and cuff bracelets. The Radiant iteration comes in gold with a row of diamonds, and sober, all-gold Monochromes were on offer for those with subtler tastes. Other options include summery renditions with white ceramic “clous” (so named after the calibrated square cobblestones of the Place Vendôme). Mix-and-match stackables and solitaires round out the story.

BulgariBulgari:In the months since Carla Bruni-Sarkozy debuted the original “summer” Diva necklace—she sported 108 carats of fancy-cut emeralds—Bulgari has been crafting a one-of-a-kind Diva for every season. The autumnal variation comes in 116 carats of moghul-cut rubellites, plus diamonds, amethysts, and mandarin garnets, while the winter version’s leaves are frosted over entirely with more than 40 carats of diamonds. Spring is still in the workshop, but it is set to be green, with mint tourmalines and peridots offset by amethysts and diamonds. Meanwhile, graphic, seventies-inflected pieces in diamonds and onyx join the Intarsio line.

ChanelChanel: Gabrielle Chanel loved pearls—real, faux, by day, by night, for sport, you name it. But there is nothing faux, or workout-appropriate, in the brand’s latest high jewelry collection. About three-quarters of the eighty-seven pieces in Perles de Chanel—the first collection in eight years to focus on the house staple—was on display in the Chanel salon this week. And the decadent wares hit all the high notes in the Chanel lexicon: ribbons, lions, camellias, and Coromandel swallows, with pearls ranging from seed-size to gumball (mostly the latter). The colorful one-off necklace strung with five sizable Australian baroque pearls and seven varieties of precious and semiprecious stones is just one of many showstoppers.

DauphinDauphin: Charlotte Dauphin de la Rochefoucauld, who chose her maiden name to headline her maison, makes her first foray into high jewelry this season, and her debut collection is nothing if not impressive. With a little help from friends like Paolo Roversi and Saskia de Brauw, the designer showcased a short line of “strong but light” pieces inspired by architecture—her gold and diamond rings and earrings could be the blueprints of the Eiffel Tower. Another cuff and matching necklace are an exercise in bone structure. Continue Reading “At Paris’ Haute Joaillerie Outings, a Twinkling Taste of What’s to Come” »

Haute Bijoux and a Gemstone Phone

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During the Fall ’13 Couture shows, which wrapped in Paris this weekend, houses debuted their jaw-dropping, and often blinding, haute joaillerie collections. Aside from a prominent seventies vibe, one thing came through loud and clear in the season’s jewelry presentations: a return to the statement stone (or perhaps we should say stones). Tina Isaac rounds up the most brilliant baubles from Dior, Chanel, Boucheron, Versace, and more, below.

A Cher Dior bracelet CHER DIOR:“I always create families, so I think of these pieces as the babies of Dear Dior,” said Victoire de Castellane during a preview of her new line of high jewelry for the house, which she has dubbed Cher Dior. “I was thinking of specific words—like “fascinating,” “sparkling”—and thinking about how to render those in gems.” True to de Castellane’s style, the resulting 21 pieces are “classic without being classic”—an array of symmetrically designed, smaller, lighter wares with colorful center stones, lacelike settings, and surprising color combinations. Take, for example, the Exquise Emeraude earrings, whose central gemstones mismatch, or the riot of colored sapphires in the Majestueuse Multicolore necklace. The Jardin Avec Fleurs earrings, whose floral design and pastel colors seem lifted straight out of the eighteenth century, were de Castellane’s starting point and remain her favorite. “It’s like a game,” she said. “These are pieces that you can wear without ever getting bored.”

Boucheron Perles D'Eclat RingBOUCHERON: This year, Boucheron, the first jeweler to open shop on the Place Vendôme, is celebrating its 120th anniversary at that address. Because the light is particularly beguiling in its south-facing atelier, head jewelry designer Claire Choisne has devised an eight-chapter story—one episode for each of the eight facets of the Place Vendôme—dubbed the Hôtel de la Lumière. One of her masterpieces picks up on a 1948 latticework necklace in sapphire and diamonds, while completely modern rock-crystal pieces are inlaid with pavé diamonds. The Perles d’Eclat necklace, for example, features large rock-crystal beads held together by the diamond slices that the house pioneered; the beads gradually progress from frosted to transparent, and inside the transparent ones sits a 3-D bouquet of diamonds.

One of Chanel's haute lionsCHANEL: Gabrielle Chanel was known to say that she was “a worker bee born under the sign of Leo.” Because the powerful, protective beast is also the symbol of Venice, where the designer traveled to recover from Boy Capel’s death, and because the house recently signed on to sponsor the restoration of the winged lion atop St. Mark’s Basilica, Chanel presented the timely Sous le Signe du Lion, a 58-piece collection inspired by the majestic feline. Pieces ranged from literal (a diamond-covered Lion Céleste which, extrapolated from the Venice city insignia, shows the beast in profile with his paw atop a sizable diamond) to the CGI-worthy (Lion Mosaique features a lion’s head emerging in three-quarter profile from a gemstone background). The Lion San Marco ring, created in tribute to St. Mark’s Basilica, is carved from a piece of lapis lazuli and set in gold and platinum with a center diamond. Only five of these were produced, and they sold out well before couture week began. Continue Reading “Haute Bijoux and a Gemstone Phone” »

Lacoste Fetes Eighty

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Fauchon, Hermes, Boucheron, and Goyard all interpreted Lacoste's crocodile motif for the house's eightieth birthday.

Things began to heat up at the French Open in Paris yesterday, as Jo-Wilfried Tsonga defeated Roger Federer, raising hopes for a hometown win. (The last time that happened was thirty years ago, when national icon Yannick Noah took home the trophy.)

Meanwhile, inside the French Tennis Federation’s museum, Lacoste invited a handful of guests to preview trophies of a different kind. To mark its eightieth birthday, the brand invited nine French luxury houses to interpret its crocodilian heritage—Hermès checked in with a tennis satchel in shiny pale green croc; Goyard with a roomy travel bag, and Boucheron with bejeweled renditions of the house logo. The idea was lying in wait in the archives, noted Boucheron creative director Claire Choisne: As it turns out, house founder René Lacoste commissioned a shimmering croc from Boucheron for his wife, Simone, in 1957.

This morning, the lineup was already packed up and headed to Colette, where it will grace the windows starting on Monday. But while some things, like the silver golf club by Christofle or those Boucheron pins, can be special ordered, others, like the Hermès and Goyard bags, are unique: The next time you’ll see them is when the Lacoste museum opens at its home base, in Troyes, sometime in 2014. Still, there is one accessible option for everyone: polo-striped éclairs by Fauchon, which will be available through June.

Photos: Courtesy of Lacoste

Out With A Bling: Couture Closes with Haute Joaillerie

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From Dior’s demure gowns to Maison Martin Margiela’s high-fashion denim, the Spring ’13 Haute Couture shows had a lot to offer. But when it comes to couture, no look is quite complete without some jewels to go with it. As the last collections walked the runways today, some of the biggest houses debuted their Haute Joaillerie collections in Paris. Tina Isaac reports back on the most opulent baubles from Chanel, Dior, Louis Vuitton, and more.

Boucheron

Snakes are already trending for 2013—but it’s worth remembering that Boucheron has been turning them out for well over a century. For Spring, the house has rifled the archives and polished up hallmark designs from its first Serpent collection of 1968, giving them a more contemporary spin. Serpent rings in sculpted gold, beading, and the house’s signature snow setting—an eye-catching pavé of studied randomness—come with one head or two, in three sizes; pendants with honeycomb backs can be worn as a necklace or mounted as brooches on gold safety pins.

Chanel
For the first time, Chanel dedicated its entire high jewelry collection—all ninety-nine pieces—to a single theme: the camellia. The flower appeared rendered every which way: mounted into 3-D diamond swirls; flattened into graphic diamond pavé etched with a black spinel border; sculpted in onyx and white coral; fashioned into a diamond, gold and lacquer ring rendition of Mademoiselle’s celebrated Coromandel screens; or articulated in a big, colorful “origami” of pink sapphires and other stones.


Dior
As a prelude to the presentation of her new collection next July, Victoire de Castellane showed a curated selection of additions to existing collections. These included a trio of slimmer caned rings and bracelets in the My Dior collection, a Les Précieuses garden-inspired necklace anchored by a sizable emerald, a Toi et Moi rose-shaped ring in diamonds and emeralds, and a unique set of antique cameos mounted into earrings for the Coffret collection. Meanwhile, the house’s watch lines are expanding fast. Colored gems offset black or white ceramic settings in the Dior 8 line, russet feathers fan into the skirt-shaped oscillating weight on the new model of the Grand Bal watch, and a trio of Mini D watches feature zingy fuchsia, turquoise, or neon yellow bands.

Louis Vuitton

The latest addition to the Place Vendôme continues its travel through time, expanding the Vuitton galaxy with new takes on classic motifs. For instance, Vuitton showed new iterations of its lacy, articulated “knife edge” settings on a collar necklace. There was also a Monogram Infini fractal mandala and delicate bracelets mounted with the house’s signature star and flower cut diamonds. If there’s anyone out there who didn’t know the house was a new installation (Vuitton opened its Vendôme boutique and workshop in 2012), they could easily be forgiven for mistaking the diamond chandelier earrings for pieces that emerged from a bygone era.

Photos: Courtesy photos