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32 posts tagged "Bruce Weber"

Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book

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Carine Roitfeld

If Carine Roitfeld has proven anything in her three decades in the fashion game, it’s that she’s a master of reinvention—of both herself and others. All one needs to do is look at her latest CR Fashion Book cover—which features reality-TV-star-turned-quasi-fashion-world fascination Kim Kardashian showing off a gilded grill—to see that. The editor, stylist, and consultant, who left her decade-long post as editor in chief of Paris Vogue in 2011 only to launch her abovementioned biannual publication to much fanfare in New York a year later, is the subject of Fabien Constant’s new documentary, Mademoiselle C. The film, which debuted in New York last night, chronicles the making of the inaugural issue of Roitfeld’s magazine and offers an intimate look into the life of the editor. “I was very surprised when I saw the film for the first time,” Roitfeld told us, donning a youthful Céline crop top and Miu Miu denim skirt. “I didn’t imagine it would be so personal. You see everything—my family, my kids, my husband, my apartment, my [dance] lessons, and this was very difficult.” We have to say, though, it was refreshing to see the editor—who’s famed for working with everyone from Karl Lagerfeld and Tom Ford to Bruce Weber and Mario Testino—behave so candidly in front of the camera. Style.com caught up with Roitfeld prior to the film’s premiere to talk life after Vogue, Nicolas Ghesquière, the future of fashion, and what it means to be sexy.

Before I turned on my recorder, you were talking about how much you admire Coco Chanel. Why is that?
She came back to work at almost 70 years old, and she came back as a success, and America was the first country to welcome her. France didn’t. They always say, you’re never a king or a queen in your own country.

Is that why you came to New York to launch CR Fashion Book? Do you feel like the Americans made you a “queen”?
I think America was very nice with me, because the day I finished Paris Vogue, I immediately got a phone call from America. Once you’re in New York, you jump. Paris is mostly retired people—I love it, and it’s a beautiful city, but it’s quite slow. In New York, you can do anything—you can shoot on Sundays, you can shoot at night, you can get a pink dog, everything you want is possible. It’s like Jay-Z’s song about the Big Apple—you never stop.

Do you miss being the editor in chief of Paris Vogue?
No. I still like the title. I think it’s a magical title, and there was a Vogue before me, there will be a Vogue after me. I have no regrets. Ten years is quite long. Otherwise, you stay forever, and you settle into office life, and I don’t like office life. It’s difficult to do things on your own, but I think it’s very exciting, and everyone says, oh, you look younger than before, and it’s just because I’m learning more.

Do you think that Emmanuelle Alt is taking Paris Vogue in the right direction?
I will not look at it. It’s her thing. It’s totally different. I don’t want to compare and I don’t want to judge. I’m over this now, you know? I do my own thing, and it takes me enough time, enough energy, I’m not here to criticize. I don’t care. I have so many projects—I’ve become a cover girl and a grandma at the same time. I have so many exciting things in my life. I don’t need to look back.

Before you launched CR Fashion Book, there were rumors that you weren’t on the best of terms with Nicolas Ghesquière. What’s your relationship like with him now?
This is the bullshit of politics in fashion. I’ve never had a problem with Nicolas. I just sent him a text and said, “I miss you!” I’ve known him since the very beginning. I think he’s the most talented person in fashion. He’s very, very smart. I’m sure he’s coming back, and I hope it’s very soon, because we miss him. And I think he’s going to surprise everyone. There are not so many big talents today, and he’s one of them.

Inevitably, Mademoiselle C is going to be compared to The September Issue, and you to Anna Wintour. How do you feel about being compared to her?
I was compared to Anna for many years. But I worked with her. I was working for her, and I think she’s a very tough woman, but she’s very honest. She’s a hard worker, and she and Grace [Coddington] have a lot of passion. And you feel passion in Mademoiselle C, too. Totally different, though. Vogue is the biggest magazine in the world; they have a lot of money. For our first issue, we had four people doing the magazine, but we have the same passion. Continue Reading “Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book” »

Pirelli Buttons Up for Fifty

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A preview of the new Pirelli calendar

The annual Pirelli calendar—famed for showcasing saucy shots of supermodels in the buff—celebrates fifty this year with a megawatt lineup, including Helena Christensen, Alessandra Ambrosio, Miranda Kerr, Alek Wek, Karolina Kurkova, and Isabeli Fontana. But judging by the series of tribute images —reportedly lensed not by the yet-to-be-revealed 2013 calendar photographer, but by Pirelli vets Patrick Demarchelier and Peter Lindbergh to build hype around the half-century milestone—the calendar’s stars are decidedly more dressed up than usual—well, by Pirelli standards, anyway. The catwalkers were snapped in black lingerie, as well as white shirts and their Skivvies. The full calendar, which has, in the past,been shot by the likes of Bruce Weber, Richard Avedon, Annie Leibovitz, Karl Lagerfeld, and Inez and Vinoodh (just to name a few), will be unveiled thisNovember—no word yet if the final images will be more, ahem, stripped-down.

Photo: Patrick Demarchelier

Model-Slash-Peacemaker: Kyleigh Kuhn

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Kyleigh Kuhn in Afghanistan

At the young age of 26, Kyleigh Kuhn has brought about more positive change than most can hope to effect in a lifetime, and she’s using her modeling career as a platform to spread the word about her humanitarian works. Hailing from California, Kuhn has shot with top-tier photographers like Bruce Weber and Patrick Demarchelier—she even landed a coveted spot in this year’s Stephen McCurry-lensed Pirelli calendar. But when she’s not in front of the camera, Kuhn is busy following in the footsteps of her philanthropist mother, Heidi, who founded Roots of Peace, an organization dedicated to de-mining, replanting, and rebuilding war-torn countries. It all began in 2003, when Kyleigh launched the Roots of Peace Penny campaign. She asked fellow youngsters to donate their spare change, which was later used to construct a ten-room schoolhouse in Mir Bacha Kot, a small village in Afghanistan located near Kabul.

The model has returned to the Kyleigh Kuhn School (she told Style.com that she was “embarrassed but honored” that they named it after her) several times since it opened in 2007. And she brought photographer Ruvan Wijesooriya along to document its 250-plus students for her new book, Yearbook Afghanistan. “Whenever I’d come back from Afghanistan, I’d try to share stories about the characters I’d met, the beautiful landscape I’d seen, and the cultural experiences I’d had. But I often felt frustrated because most of the time, people would ask me about the country’s violent aspects instead of the things that excited and inspired me. This book was a way to do those parts justice,” Kuhn explained. While flipping through the glossy pages of boys and girls in grades one through nine, Kuhn said the publication helps “an American audience get a sense of the kids I’m interacting with, but also builds solidarity for the school. It boosts the students’ morale and helps them to reflect. The children get to see images of themselves and their peers—maybe for the first time in their lives.” Continue Reading “Model-Slash-Peacemaker: Kyleigh Kuhn” »

Riding Dirty

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Louise du Toit wearing a shirt from Acne's capsule collectionAcne Studios has rarely met an out-of-the-box idea it hasn’t liked. So though for most labels, publishing its own limited-edition collection of rodeo-rider portraits from a mid-century physique photographer wouldn’t be the first order of business, here it is. And so last night, with its usual clutch of models in tow—Hanne Gaby Odiele, Jacquelyn Jablonski, Ji Hye Park, et al.—Acne launched Rodeo, a hardbound book of photos from the collection of New Yorker critic Vince Aletti. Must be something in the air lately. As Hedi Slimane’s latest editorial suggested: Cowboys—they’re a thing.

 

Bruce of Los Angeles, little-known except among physique-photo aficionados, has nevertheless been influential among later photographers. Aletti traced elements of his style in the work of Mapplethorpe, Herb Ritts, and Bruce Weber. (The similarities were in some cases so striking, you could probably have bylined the book Bruce of Los Weber.) “It’s clear that he’s looked at it and had some appreciation of this period of work,” Aletti said between tête-à-têtes with Fran Lebowitz last night. “And I’d imagine he knows [of] some other photographer named Bruce.”

 

Unlike much of the photographer’s oeuvre, these rodeo shots are naturalistic, of real guys (rather than models) in their own clothes (rather than nude). Of course, exceptions apply. In any case, Acne took the opportunity to create a little capsule collection of clothes around them, too, for those who prefer to wear, rather than page through, their vintage beefcake. There are T-shirts, glammy cowboy boots stitched with appliqués of cowboys, and the traffic-stopping shirt modeled last night by the label’s Louise du Toit, available at Acne shops now.

Photo: Courtesy of Acne

Kim Kardashian: Star Du Jour

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The Spring 2013 issue of Du Jour, the online and print magazine that caters to Gilt Groupe‘s top spenders, has an unlikely cover girl. Out today online and the first week of March in print, the new issue features Kim Kardashian, who, shot by Bruce Weber, appears in her first pregnancy photo shoot. Weber lensed two covers: The first, which debuts above, shows Kardashian dressed up like a Tahitian princess (although, with a floral Du Jour crown hovering about her head, she looks uncannily like a Madonna), while the second depicts her, sans makeup, emerging from a pool. The pared-down photographs were taken at Weber’s Miami home. “We had come off this moment where we launched with Christy Turlington and were lucky enough to have Nicole Kidman on the second cover, with Patrick Demarchelier shooting, and we wanted to try something a little bit different,” says Nicole Vecchiarelli, who serves as the magazine’s co-editor in chief, along with Keith Pollock.

Now one might not think a reality-TV star would appeal to the magazine’s high-net-worth readers, but Vecchiarelli believes Kardashian will capture their interest. “We realized that everyone has an opinion about her. Our idea was that any audience would be able to appreciate seeing someone who they may view in a certain way reshape her image. It was an artistic endeavor, and I think there’s a lot for our audience to really delve in to, whether they’re personally into her or not.” Vecchiarelli adds that the interview with Kardashian, written by Du Jour‘s editor at large Alyssa Giacobbe, reveals that as she approaches motherhood, the reality queen is rethinking her approach to privacy and how she connects with her fans. What’s more is that Weber chose do draw visual comparisons to Kardashian and Elizabeth Taylor (there are even a few images of Kardashian leafing through books about the actress). “Could she ever be an Elizabeth Taylor or Marilyn Monroe personality of her generation? If she [were to become that] it would be because she’s continued down the road that she did with Bruce—opening herself up to different ideas and pairing herself with different kinds of people.”

Photo: Bruce Weber