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19 posts tagged "Bruno Frisoni"

Two Centuries Of Fashion History, Starring Tilda Swinton

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Christian Lacroix, Haider Ackermann, Martine Sitbon, Bruno Frisoni. They all gathered at the Palais de Tokyo last night for a one-of-a-kind, one-woman fashion show: The Impossible Wardrobe, conceived and curated by the Musée Galliera’s Olivier Saillard and starring none other than Tilda Swinton. The performance lasted nearly 40 minutes, or about four times the normal length of a fashion show. No one minded. On the contrary, the crowd gave the duo a standing ovation.

Wearing white gloves, a lab coat, and beige suede pumps, Swinton variously carried, clutched, and presented vintage clothes and accessories up and down the runway, making eye contact with the audience along the way and pausing in front of a mirror to measure up how she might look if she was allowed to put them on. “It’s not possible to wear the clothes in a museum,” Saillard said, by way of explaining the show’s concept and name. “If Tilda hadn’t accepted our proposal, we wouldn’t have done it.” Above Swinton, a news ticker spelled put the pieces’ provenance, and there were some truly special items here: a 1968 Paco Rabanne dress worn by Brigitte Bardot, Elsa Schiaparelli-designed gloves with built-in gold talons from 1936, an embroidered top that belonged to Isadora Duncan in the 1920s, even a tailcoat covered in gold bullion worn by Napoleon. The Oscar winner actually sniffed the collar on that one, as if to get a sense of his essence. “C’est sublime,” said Bouchra Jarrar afterward. “A new way to talk about the history of fashion. One must never forget history.” In the history of this season, this will rank as one of its most fabulous moments.

CLICK HERE for a slideshow of Swinton wearing some of the pieces from the Musée Galliera collection >


Photo: Piero Biasion

Around The World In 80 Bags

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For the first time ever, Roger Vivier is debuting a collection of bags and shoes without the brand’s signature buckle: Prismick. Instead, the label’s creative director, Bruno Frisoni, used leather-on-suede appliqués in a variety of colors for a 3-D effect, a look that was inspired by his passion for art and contemporary architecture. To show off the Prismick collection, Roger Vivier asked stylish women around the globe, including Amanda Hearst (top), Fernanda Niven (middle), and Bettina Prentice (below) to pose with one of the new pieces in the setting of their choosing. (Hearst opted for the Brooklyn Bridge; Niven for an organic garden in Brooklyn; and Prentice at Haunch of Venison Gallery). The three will be on hand tonight in New York to launch the portrait series at Vivier’s Madison Avenue store. Their compatriots from farther afield will be on display, too: Photographers also shot Marta Ferri, Fatima Bhutto, Harumi Klossowski, India Mahdavi, and more in the U.K., Italy, France, and the Far East. Continue Reading “Around The World In 80 Bags” »

The 12 Days Of Christmas: Day 1

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The holiday season is upon us. We’ve already quizzed some of our favorite fashion personalities—from Bruno Frisoni to Miranda Kerr—on what they’d get for one another, and now we’re turning the focus to our own office. Check in every day to see what Style.com’s editors and contributors are going to gift (and hoping to get) for the holidays. First up: Tim Blanks.

Escentric Molecules wasn’t produced by my own fair hand, but it is the work of my other half’s company, so whenever I give it to friends, I do feel a vestige of that warm, fuzzy “here’s one I prepared earlier” sensation. Especially with this season’s limited edition, in a matte black glass bottle fired from volcanic sand. Sexy new look, same seductive scent. But I still don’t understand how we all smell so different when we’re wearing it.

Escentric 01 Black Edition, $140, and Molecule 01 Black Edition, $140, available at LuckyScent.com and Barneys New York.

Photo: Courtesy of Escentric Molecules

Roger’s Rendez-Vous

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Couture allows ready-to-wear designers to go for broke with the most fabulous fabrications money can buy. But it’s not restricted to the runway. Last season, Roger Vivier debuted the limited-edition Rendez-Vous collection inspired by the no-holds-barred spirit of couture, creating luxe updates on several of the house’s classic styles. Rendez-Vous returns for Fall 2011 with a new collection Vivier creative director Bruno Frisoni unveiled in Paris last week.

The look may be couture-rarified, but the spirit is rock ‘n’ roll. “Rock!” Frisoni told Style.com about his inspiration for the new collection. “Think Keith Richards, with an intellectual twist and a thirties feel. I took Roger Vivier’s iconic pieces and reworked certain proportions and heels, adding the precious craftsmanship of Parisian artisans.” Ergo, a Punk clutch gets bedecked with feathers or and the Miss Viv snaked with twisting rope details (top). The classic Virgule (or Comma) Vivier heel gets tweaked to become the Vertigo, creating an architectural buttress so that, in Frisoni’s words, “functionality becomes a jewel and rock energy is added” (above). Sounds as though M. Frisoni is rocking to the same punky beat that’s inspired Jean Paul Gaultier this season. Crank it up!

Photos: Courtesy of Roger Vivier

A Magazine And Acne Paper Play Host In Paris

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The party people were out in force on Friday night in Paris’ Marais to celebrate the latest editions of two—get this—print magazines. The revolving-editor A Magazine chose Giambattista Valli to helm its new issue: his chosen theme, “real beauty,” and his cover, a portrait of River Phoenix by Michael Tighe (above right). Marina Abramovic, Nan Goldin, Chiara Clemente, Lee Radziwill, Peter Schlesinger, and Kenzo Takada all collaborated on the tenth issue, as did Sasha Pivovarova, who did a series of self-portraits. “This magazine is about what nourishes me; it’s another way to show my inspirations,” said Valli, who opened his exploration with a 1975 quote from Yves Saint Laurent: “What we imagine may be very beautiful but nothing replaces reality.” (To buy, visit www.bruil.info.)

Around the corner at the very private Maison de La Chasse, Maria Berenson and editor Thomas Persson (below right) co-hosted a fête for the new issue of Acne Paper, the Studio Issue, and Kristin Scott Thomas and Bruno Frisoni (below left), Nicola Formichetti, Lanvin’s Lucas Ossendrijver and Elie Top, and Catherine Baba all dropped by to mill in the hunting house’s drawing rooms. The mag includes visits to, or representations of, the studios of artists like Matisse, Pollock, and Hockney, as well as photographic portfolios by Helmut Lang and Eric Boman. A nude Leigh Bowery (shot by Bruce Bernard as he sat for a portrait with Lucien Freud) appears on the cover (above left), and hostess Berenson is inside, shot by Katerina Jebb in Jean Cocteau’s house in Milly-La-Forêt. “Marisa’s grandmother, Elsa Schiaparelli, was so close to Cocteau it was natural to shoot her in his old house,” Persson explained of the spread, “and Acne is based on the idea of a creative collective, so we focused on artists’ studios as the place where creativity happens.” (To buy, visit Acne, 10 Greene St., NYC, or www.acnestudios.com.)

Photos: Courtesy of A Magazine; Courtesy of Acne Paper