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April 21 2014

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5 posts tagged "Camilla Nickerson"

Exclusive: LVMH Reveals the Forty Heavy Hitters on Its LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers Experts Panel

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LVMH Panel of Experts

Back in November, we broke the news that LVMH was launching its new 300,000-euro LVMH Prize for Young Designers. After applications close on February 2, an LVMH team will select thirty promising talents from the long list of hopefuls. And during Paris fashion week, those up-and-comers will present their collections to an esteemed panel of forty industry insiders. Today, we can reveal the heavy hitters who will be sitting in the judges’ seats, and boy, if the fact that 300K is on the line doesn’t give the contestants butterflies, the international powerhouses set to survey their work just might. Central Saint Martins’ Louise Wilson, stylist Olivier Rizzo, Net-a-Porter’s Natalie Massenet, stylist Camilla Nickerson, Colette’s Sarah Andelman, Dover Street Market’s Adrian Joffe, and editor Katie Grand are just some of the experts in the group. Of course, we can’t leave out Style.com’s own Tim Blanks and Jo-Ann Furniss, who will be joining their peers in narrowing down the pool from thirty to ten designers. As for the ultimate winner, we’ll have to hold our breath until May, when a group including Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Humberto Leon, Carol Lim, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, as well as Delphine Arnault, Jean-Paul Claverie, and Pierre-Yves Roussel decide who wins the grand prize. But considering the knowledge and taste levels the members of LVMH’s panel boast, it’s going to be worth the wait. Take a look at the full list of judges, below. As for the ultimate winner, we’ll have to hold our breath…

LVMH’s Panel of Experts
Imran Amed, founder and editor of Business of Fashion (London)
Sarah Andelman, creative director of Colette (Paris)
Fabien Baron, art director, founder of Baron & Baron (New York)
Tim Blanks, editor at large, Style.com (London)
Mariacarla Boscono, supermodel and muse (Rome)
Angelica Cheung, editor in chief of Vogue China (Beijing)
Alexandre de Betak, founder of Bureau Betak (Paris)
Godfrey Deeny, editor at large, fashion, Le Figaro (Paris)
Patrick Demarchelier, photographer (New York)
Babeth Djian, editor in chief of Numéro (Paris)
Linda Fargo, senior vice president of Bergdorf Goodman (New York)
Jo-Ann Furniss, writer, editor, and creative director (London)
Chantal Gaemperlé, LVMH group executive vice president for human resources and synergies (Paris)
Stephen Gan, founder of Fashion Media Group LLC (New York)
Julie Gilhart, consultant (New York)
Katie Grand, editor in chief of Love magazine (London)
Jefferson Hack, co-founder and editorial director of Dazed Group (London)
Laure Hériard Dubreuil, co-founder and chief executive of The Webster (Miami)
Adrian Joffe, chief executive officer of Dover Street Market International (London)
Sylvia Jorif, journalist at Elle magazine (Paris)
Hirofumi Kurino, creative Director of United Arrows (Tokyo)
Linda Loppa, director of Polimoda (Florence)
Natalie Massenet, founder and executive chairman of Net-a-Porter (London)
Pat McGrath, makeup artist (New York)
Marigay McKee, president of Saks Fifth Avenue (New York)
Sarah Mower, contributing editor, American Vogue (London)
Camilla Nickerson, stylist (New York)
Lilian Pacce, fashion editor and writer (São Paulo)
Jean-Jacques Picart, fashion and luxury consultant (Paris)
Gaia Repossi, creative director of Repossi (Paris)
Olivier Rizzo, stylist (Antwerp)
Carine Roitfeld, Founder of CR Fashion Book (Paris)
Olivier Saillard, director of the Galliera Museum (Paris)
Marie-Amelie Sauvé, stylist (Paris)
Carla Sozzani, founder of 10 Corso Como (Milan)
Charlotte Stockdale, stylist (London)
Tomoki Sukezane, stylist (Tokyo)
Natalia Vodianova, supermodel and philanthropist (Paris)
Louise Wilson, course director of the Fashion M.A. at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (London)
Dasha Zhukova, editor in chief of Garage magazine and founder of Garage Museum of Contemporary Art (Moscow)

Photo: Courtesy Photo

When The Weather Gets Cold, Fashion Types Get Creative

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Givenchy furIf nothing else, the confluence of the Polar Vortex and Pre-Fall presentations in New York has given us the chance to see the inventive ways in which fashion editors and designers choose to face down slippery sidewalks and subzero temperatures. Stylist Camilla Nickerson, for example, bypassed winter boots for nubby oatmeal socks and a pair of black-and-burgundy open-toed flats from Céline’s Resort ’14 lineup, crushing the notion that socks-and-sandals is a faux pas. Definitely cozy-chic, but we’re guessing she wasn’t planning on walking too many blocks to her next appointment. Elle‘s Samira Nasr, meanwhile, braved New York’s menacing gray puddles in a pair of pristine white moccasin boots, and WSJ. editor-in-chief Kristina O’Neill kept her calves above freezing with a pair of charcoal leg warmers, which she pulled over her black skinny jeans. However, the most-thoroughly-bundled award has to go to The Row’s Mary-Kate Olsen. The designer walked editors around her showroom while wearing a navy shearling coat with a slick fur collar. She and sister Ashley’s Greenwich Street headquarters weren’t exactly without heat, but they are only a block from the very chilly Hudson, and you never know when a river-effect draft might blow through. But perhaps the look that best sums up our schizophrenic weather (55 degrees on Monday, 12 degrees on Tuesday) was the one Jamie Bochert donned for the Givenchy Pre-Fall lookbook: open-toed sandals and a full-on fur.

Photo: Courtesy of Givenchy

The Image Makers: Inez And Vinoodh

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In a new series, Style.com sits down with the best in the field of contemporary fashion photography to talk about both the process and the product. First up: the husband-and-wife Dutch shooters Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin.


At exactly 34 characters long, Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin easily have the longest photo credit in the business. Admittedly, the count includes A-N-D, but that little linking word is crucial. Van Lamsweerde and Matadin are partners in every sense—creatively, romantically, as parents of their 9-year-old son Charles Star Matadin, and seemingly everything in between. The Dutch natives have been together for 26 years, and to sit with the two of them for an interview is to witness genuine sentence-finishing synergy.

There’s yet more neat duality in their work, which straddles art and fashion, gives you high glamour with a touch of the surreal or grotesque, ranges from classical black-and-white portraiture to near camp, and inevitably includes some degree of gender-bending. It also extends to their hefty new monograph, called Pretty Much Everything ($700, www.taschen.com), which comes out this month and encompasses their work for magazines like Paris Vogue and V, campaigns for houses like Yves Saint Laurent and Balenciaga, and their art projects. In the two volumes, van Lamsweerde and Matadin scrapped chronology, and instead painstakingly went through the 666 photographs to create very specific pairings, each with their own visual logic. “It takes time away so it becomes one body of work,” explains Matadin. “You see a picture from 1985 next to one from 2011, and they’re still holding up.” Van Lamsweerde and Matadin talked to Style.com about their unique relationship, the wonders of Lady Gaga, and why you shouldn’t peer into the inner workings of a fashion shoot.

You have this book now but you had the retrospective exhibit last year in Amsterdam. Had you always planned to do that at 25 years?
Vinoodh Matadin: This actually started nine years ago when Inez was pregnant. Karl Lagerfeld said, “Oh, you’re pregnant. You should do a book.”
Inez van Lamsweerde: He said, “Oh, you have to have a project while you’re pregnant.” Which is very cute.

And very Karl.
IVL: Yeah, it was sweet. So we started working on it and kept shooting and kept adding pictures and the book grew and grew. When it was done, it was kind of 25 years of us together. And by now, it’s again a year later so it’s 26 years of work together. But the show was based on the book.
VM: Basically we started the book putting everything in order.
IVL: Chronological order.
VM: But then we thought, it’s too soon. We’re not there yet. So we decided to redo the book.
IVL: The exciting thing for us was the editing and putting it together. Once we decided no chronological, which for us was not interesting, it became really about the combination of the pictures.

The pairings have a nice rhythm.
IVL: It’s really about how all those images that we’ve made in the past 26 years live inside our heads, especially this idea of art, fashion, and portraiture being all the same, from the same source. It really depends on the context or the venue in which you see the image.
VM: It also became one body of work because it takes time away. You see a picture from 1985 next to a picture of 2011 and they’re still holding up. You don’t know when this picture is from. It could be yesterday or 26 years ago. Continue Reading “The Image Makers: Inez And Vinoodh” »

Teen Jagger, Lily’s Lucky Charms, And More…

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Meet Georgia May: The youngest of Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall’s progeny is the new face of Hudson Jeans, the only company that seems to have any money these days. And, as if one insanely famous name weren’t enough, the ads were shot by Mario Sorrenti and styled by Camilla Nickerson. See what we mean about the money? [WWD]

If Sean Avery is to be believed, Alexandra Richards is an impressive multitasker. The hockey star espied the model-slash-DJ getting a pedicure while spinning at Surf Lodge in Montauk. [Page Six]

Lily Allen’s new jewelry lines features pink hearts, yellow moons, orange stars, and green clovers. OK, not exactly, but it does have poodles. [Vogue U.K.]

Photo: Jonathan Hordle / Rex USA

Photo: Jim Dyson / Getty Images

Blasblog: The A-Crowd Comes Out For Nate Lowman

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With so many art-loving financiers losing their pants in the current economy, the art world might be in for some tough times. But Nate Lowman isn’t going down without a smile. Or, more specifically, without a smiley face. That familiar little yellow circle with two dots and a curve was the ruling icon at his Saturday night opening party at the Maccarone gallery. A festive crowd of fashion and art world aficionados—and even two tween rappers called Little Wiki and Powered By Googs—came out to show Lowman support (Wiki and Googsdid so by free-styling by the front door). Despite the buzz, Lowman admitted to feeling not quite up to smiley-face standards. “I’m too tired,” he said, acknowledging he hadn’t slept much in the weeks leading up to the show. “Though I did manage to work in a shower before, which was nice.” Explaining the smiley faces, Lowman said he thought now was a good time to showcase something reminiscent of happier times—childhood doodles and the feel-good seventies. Lowman’s girlfriend, Mary-Kate Olsen—there with her sister, Ashley—was working a few oldies but goodies of her own: A vintage Prada brown leather jacket with fringe and a very late-nineties messy half ponytail. Further in the back of the gallery, where the likes of Camilla Nickerson and Jen Brill had congregated with the artist’s father, Lowman showed some of his more traditional pieces, including grainy images of an old headstone. (My favorites, however, were a picture of three dirty bottoms and a traditional landscape turned on its side, which suggested something naughtier.) Hopefully Lowman enjoyed his night out—it looked that way later at the Beatrice Inn— because on Sunday day he was starting his next project, a large installation that will debut at the Venice Biennale.

 

 

Photo: Courtesy of Nate Lowman