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September 2 2014

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7 posts tagged "Camille Bidault-Waddington"

EXCLUSIVE: Inez & Vinoodh Add Color, and Soon, Clothes, to Their Repertoire

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Camille Bidault Waddington in Inez & Vinoodh jewelry

It didn’t take much time for Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin’s fine jewelry collection, Pretty Much Everything, to take off. But that’s no real surprise. After twenty-seven years in the biz, the renowned photographers and artists have a pretty good idea of what we fashion folk (and folks in general, for that matter) want—and they deliver. For their sophomore outing, the husband-and-wife pair continued to play with the interlocking-ring concept—modeled on their own wedding bands—with which they began last September. However, this time around, they’ve introduced new proportions, stones, and a rainbow of colors via a series of stackable enamel rings in varying widths. “There’s so much color in our heads because of how we live, and we couldn’t find the shades we wanted in actual gemstones,” said Van Lamsweerde of their choice to experiment with enamel. Ranging from lavender to shocking pink to electric yellow and beyond, the hues on offer were inspired by Inez & Vinoodh’s enviable New York apartment. So it’s fitting that the duo tapped their architect, Simrel Achenbach of Descience Lab, to help make the tints a reality. “Simrel has also created the paints for Francesco Clemente for years, so he knows a lot about color.” While that’s perhaps the understatement of the century, the team-up paid off. Who else could perfectly translate the orange of a Leonor Fini painting, the blue of an Yves Klein coffee table, or the shade of the family couch into jewelry?

The rings debut exclusively above in a portrait—lensed by the designers, naturally—of stylist Camille Bidault Waddington. “A lot of the furniture and art found in our apartment stems from the seventies, and Camille’s personal style and sense of color is very reminiscent of the eclectic and ethereal chic of that time,” said the couple. “Women can stack and combine all fifteen colors differently to amplify their mood or personality, and Camille’s portrait is the first in a series of magnificent people wearing their personal combinations.”

Pretty Much Everything

Elsewhere, there were wide, 18-karat white gold, rose gold, yellow gold, and oxidized silver bangles, each of which was attached to a contrasting metal band or a string of vivid stones or white pearls. Also new were precious iterations of their signature ring and star necklaces that come in strands of sapphires, rubies, emeralds, very rare Sleeping Beauty turquoise, or pearls. Slim bracelets garnished with diamond, emerald, ruby, sapphire, or Tahitian-pearl-embellished chains felt delicate and bohemian, while pavé diamond earrings oozed a decadent breed of cool. Currently carried by Net-a-Porter, Barneys New York, and Colette, among other retailers, the range, according to Van Lamsweerde, “has that chic, hippie vibe that I love, especially when it’s layered with pieces from our first collection. It’s fine, but it’s personal and easy—it’s not a statement, but at the same time, it still says that you understand fashion.”

Going forward, Inez & Vinoodh plan to expand their enamel selection and—get this—are working toward an apparel launch. “I can’t say anything yet, but you can expect it in the fall,” teased Van Lamsweerde. “Similar to our jewelry line, it will include things that we feel like we’re missing.” When asked why, with her and Matadin’s exhausting list of projects (major campaigns, music videos, perfume, and editorials are just some of their recent endeavors), they’re taking on yet another venture, Van Lamsweerde laughed. “We’ve learned so much from all the incredible people we’ve worked with throughout the years. Everyone is constantly feeding us input, and it’s too much fun. So, we thought, Why not?”

Photo: Inez & Vinoodh 

A Street-Style Primer For The September Shows

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New York fashion week officially kicks off in 20 days. That means that editors everywhere have likely begun planning outfits in hopes of getting snapped by the roving brigade of street-style photographers. While there’s no denying the can’t-drag-your-eyes-away fabulousness of oft-lensed subjects like Anna Dello Russo, Giovanna Battaglia, and those ubiquitous Russians, we’re always on the lookout for the next street-style stars. And lately we’ve noticed several girls with the potential to blast off at the upcoming shows. Take Eleonora Carisi (pictured). The Italian blogger and owner of the concept boutique You Store, in Turin, has a knack for putting together eccentric ensembles like the cartoonish Daniel Palillo dress she paired with a fuzzy yellow topper back in March. Esther Quek is another one who’s getting used to the flashbulbs; the fashion director of The Rake could teach the boys a lesson or two in tailored suits. Our own Tommy Ton recently called out Ursina Gysi (who is Camille Bidault-Waddington’s assistant) as one of his “most sought-after subjects.” We’ve got a hunch we’ll be seeing more of her and these other under-the-radar girls next month.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW of future street-style stars.

Photo: Courtesy of Candice Lake

Is There Anything This Woman Doesn’t Do?

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Camille Bidault-Waddington is one of the world’s top stylists, consulting on Marc by Marc Jacobs, Pucci, and Byblos and contributing to Self Service, Numero, and Pop (and still finding time to make regular appearances on Purple Diary). But lately, we’ve noticed even more multitasking: There was the appearance on Marc’s Fall 2010 collection catwalk, and now, for Another‘s Web site, a new editorial she’s styled and shot herself. Apparently she’s training young multitaskers, too. The retro-inspired pieces from the Spring collections of Miu Miu and Celine are modeled by her assistant, Ursula Gysi.

Photo: Camille Bidault-Waddington/anothermag.com

Gods And Party Monsters At Yazbukey’s Tenth Anniversary Bash

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Yaz Bukey and her sister Emel are Paris party girls extraordinaires, so their accessories line Yazbukey’s tenth anniversary requires nothing less than ten parties to celebrate. Yaz has a gift for revamping the classics—she designed a gift box for Paris’ primo macaron purveyor Ladurée earlier this year, and created a mini collection of Barbie-inspired Plexiglas baubles that will be available at Colette this May—and for her latest trick, she made over the vintage Parisian vodka-and-caviar club Raspoutine into Yazpoutine. The dimly lit, red velvet lair was stocked with Baba Yaga dolls, pictures of Russian folk dancers, and ancient samovars. Jefferson Hack (pictured, with Laetitia Crahay and Josephine de la Baume), Camille Bidault-Waddington, Mario Testino, Nicola Formichetti, Olivier Zahm, and Catherine Baba stopped by for a “tableau vivant” performance by Paris’ House of Drama troupe. (Emphasis on the vivant, not the tableau.) House of Drama’s Aymeric Bergada Du Cadet—Bukey’s former design assistant—turned himself into a whirling dervish, assisted by the troupe’s exotic dancers, before one and all fell to the floor for a moment of communal ecstasy. Yaz herself joined the tableau as a deity of sorts, attired in a corset—her preferred stage attire. But some things are apparently out of even a goddess’ hands. Bukey was scheduled to fly to NYC the following morning to work with Zac Posen on the bags for his Z Spoke collection, but he’ll have to wait until that Icelandic volcanic ash blows away from the European skyline.

Photo: Olivier Zahm/purple-diary.com

Friday Night Lights

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On any given Friday night, the corner of 14th Street and Ninth Avenue is going to be a traffic morass. But if the gridlock seemed a little heavier than usual last night, it probably had something to do with all the cabs stopping in front of Abe & Arthur’s, the joint that’s taken over the former Lotus space. Much to the surprise of guests, both Rag & Bone and Charlotte Ronson had booked their after-parties at the venue; the designers themselves only became aware of the overlap the day before. Rag was downstairs, Ronson up, and more than a few fashion VIPs found themselves walking into the wrong party by accident. C’est la vie: Pretty much everyone at both parties was landing at the Jane later, anyway. Erin Wasson had taken over the mezzanine at the hotel for her postshow soirée, but it didn’t take long for that upstairs/downstairs divide to be breached, either. Kirsten Dunst, Camille Bidault-Waddington, André, Humberto Leon, Swaim Hutson, and Kate Mulleavy were among the attendees finding room to mingle wherever they could—per usual this week, the bar was packed to the gills. Wasson herself could be found, at one point, perched on the bar downstairs waiting for a drink like a regular plebe. “I don’t really care if everyone liked the show,” she said of her blowout at the tents, which saw Gang Gang Dance playing, Bruce Willis watching, and models including Freja and Lily Donaldson walking. “All I care about is that everyone felt it.” And with that, Wasson was on to the next thing—most imminently, elbowing her way back upstairs. “Anyway,” she commented, “the show’s in the past now. And I’m all about the future.”

Photo: Hanuk