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71 posts tagged "Carine Roitfeld"

Legacy of Style: Fashionable Mother-Daughter Duos, Just in Time for Mother’s Day

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Mother's Day“You’re just like your mother.” Many women meet such a comparison with dread, but for those lucky enough to have ultra-stylish mums, it’s a compliment of the highest order. Who wouldn’t want to learn the art of getting dressed from an icon like Kate Moss, Jane Birkin, or Jerry Hall? Having good taste is a birthright for their respective daughters Lila Grace, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lou Doillon, and Georgia May Jagger, so it comes as no surprise that many of these girls have become fashion darlings in their own right. In honor of Mother’s Day this Sunday, we rounded up twenty of our favorite mother-daughter pairs. From the quintessentially French Roitfelds to the pinup-worthy Dellal clan to the edgy power duo that is Lisa Bonet and Zoë Kravitz, there’s plenty of multigenerational inspiration here.

Click for a slideshow of stylish mothers and daughters.

Prada Brings the Harlem Renaissance to Milan

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prada

This Thursday, on the evening of its Fall ’14 show, Prada will fete the latest installment of its Iconoclasts series—a project, launched in 2009, that has seen the likes of Katie Grand, Alex White, Olivier Rizzo, and Carine Roitfeld reimagine Prada boutiques in the fashion capitals. This time around, the house has tapped W magazine’s Edward Enninful to share his vision, and he’s chosen to style the brand’s Via Montenapoleone men’s and women’s boutiques in the image of the Harlem Renaissance. At the women’s shop, Enninful will install a series of black and white mannequins, clad in Spring ’14 and archival Prada looks, and pose them as if they were guests at a swanky Jazz Age era club. (The ambience will be topped off with a glitzy Art Deco bar.) Meanwhile, the men’s store will feature game tables and a blues trio. “The event is meant as a celebration of Miuccia Prada’s incredible work. Hopefully people will leave the event with a smile on their face,” Enninful told Style.com. “It is a very joyful moment, and I hope that people will be inspired by the men’s and women’s collections, the installations in each store, and the culturally inclusive direction of this moment in the Iconoclasts series.” To give us a better sense of what to expect, the editor sent us an inspiration image: Palmer Hayden’s painting We Four in Paris, above.

Photo: Palmer Jayden’s We Four in Paris , courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Exclusive: Keeping Up With CR

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CR Fashion Book

Fun fact: Carine Roitfeld’s favorite fairy tale is E.T. “It’s not a traditional fairy tale, but I love E.T. because it combines science fiction and fantasy with a touch of sadness. All of the best fairy tales have that—something dark with something light,” the editor told Style.com. Why on earth would we be speaking with Mlle. Roitfeld about extraterrestrial eighties flicks, you ask? Because “fairy tales” happens to be the concept behind the latest edition of CR Fashion Book, which hits newsstands on February 25.

Considering Roitfeld has facilitated a few fashion Cinderella stories since launching her zine in 2012, “fairy tales” seems a fitting theme for issue four. The editor’s choice to put Kim Kardashian on the cover of issue three helped convince the industry’s elite to (kind of) embrace the reality-TV star. And Kate Upton’s issue one cover made readers recognize that she could be an all-American bombshell and a high-fashion model, too. (For the record, a Brigitte Niedermair pointe shoe and Ukrainian ballet dancer Sergei Polunin covered issue two, but that’s not terribly pertinent here.) Roitfeld’s latest princess-in-the-making? Nineteen-year-old Gigi Hadid, whose Bruce Weber-lensed cover (right) debut exclusively here, alongside a second E.T. themed cover featuring Lindsey Wixson, shot by Sebastian Faena (left). “Gigi is next in the line of athletic, voluptuous babes who transition to high-fashion success,” said CR Fashion Book design director Stephen Gan. Not unlike Kim K., Hadid also happens to be on reality TV—she’s best known for her role on Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills (as a daughter, not a housewife). “It may be a cliché, but this is a girl who lights up a room. When I met her, I immediately sensed her star quality—it was only days later that I found out she was already a reality-TV star,” Gan continued. Did we ever in a million years think Roitfeld would fall for not one, but two reality darlings in the span of six months? No. But we’re inclined to trust her judgment. After all, she did introduce the world to Lara Stone.

Photos: Sebastian Faena, Bruce Weber

And Now, Karl Lagerfeld Pushing A Baby Stroller

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On a list of things that seemingly do not go together, Karl Lagerfeld and infants would rank pretty high. And yet this footage of the famously stone-faced “Uncle Karl” pushing Romy—Julia Restoin Roitfeld’s daughter—around in a stroller might just be one of the best things we’ve ever seen. Pulled from Fabien Constant’s forthcoming Carine Roitfeld documentary, Mademoiselle C, the clip shows the Kaiser taking a quick spin and weighing in on breast-feeding.

In honor of Karl’s 80th birthday, we’re bringing you the video’s exclusive debut. For more candid moments from fashion heavyweights, catch Mademoiselle C when it hits theaters on September 11.

Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book

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Carine Roitfeld

If Carine Roitfeld has proven anything in her three decades in the fashion game, it’s that she’s a master of reinvention—of both herself and others. All one needs to do is look at her latest CR Fashion Book cover—which features reality-TV-star-turned-quasi-fashion-world fascination Kim Kardashian showing off a gilded grill—to see that. The editor, stylist, and consultant, who left her decade-long post as editor in chief of Paris Vogue in 2011 only to launch her abovementioned biannual publication to much fanfare in New York a year later, is the subject of Fabien Constant’s new documentary, Mademoiselle C. The film, which debuted in New York last night, chronicles the making of the inaugural issue of Roitfeld’s magazine and offers an intimate look into the life of the editor. “I was very surprised when I saw the film for the first time,” Roitfeld told us, donning a youthful Céline crop top and Miu Miu denim skirt. “I didn’t imagine it would be so personal. You see everything—my family, my kids, my husband, my apartment, my [dance] lessons, and this was very difficult.” We have to say, though, it was refreshing to see the editor—who’s famed for working with everyone from Karl Lagerfeld and Tom Ford to Bruce Weber and Mario Testino—behave so candidly in front of the camera. Style.com caught up with Roitfeld prior to the film’s premiere to talk life after Vogue, Nicolas Ghesquière, the future of fashion, and what it means to be sexy.

Before I turned on my recorder, you were talking about how much you admire Coco Chanel. Why is that?
She came back to work at almost 70 years old, and she came back as a success, and America was the first country to welcome her. France didn’t. They always say, you’re never a king or a queen in your own country.

Is that why you came to New York to launch CR Fashion Book? Do you feel like the Americans made you a “queen”?
I think America was very nice with me, because the day I finished Paris Vogue, I immediately got a phone call from America. Once you’re in New York, you jump. Paris is mostly retired people—I love it, and it’s a beautiful city, but it’s quite slow. In New York, you can do anything—you can shoot on Sundays, you can shoot at night, you can get a pink dog, everything you want is possible. It’s like Jay-Z’s song about the Big Apple—you never stop.

Do you miss being the editor in chief of Paris Vogue?
No. I still like the title. I think it’s a magical title, and there was a Vogue before me, there will be a Vogue after me. I have no regrets. Ten years is quite long. Otherwise, you stay forever, and you settle into office life, and I don’t like office life. It’s difficult to do things on your own, but I think it’s very exciting, and everyone says, oh, you look younger than before, and it’s just because I’m learning more.

Do you think that Emmanuelle Alt is taking Paris Vogue in the right direction?
I will not look at it. It’s her thing. It’s totally different. I don’t want to compare and I don’t want to judge. I’m over this now, you know? I do my own thing, and it takes me enough time, enough energy, I’m not here to criticize. I don’t care. I have so many projects—I’ve become a cover girl and a grandma at the same time. I have so many exciting things in my life. I don’t need to look back.

Before you launched CR Fashion Book, there were rumors that you weren’t on the best of terms with Nicolas Ghesquière. What’s your relationship like with him now?
This is the bullshit of politics in fashion. I’ve never had a problem with Nicolas. I just sent him a text and said, “I miss you!” I’ve known him since the very beginning. I think he’s the most talented person in fashion. He’s very, very smart. I’m sure he’s coming back, and I hope it’s very soon, because we miss him. And I think he’s going to surprise everyone. There are not so many big talents today, and he’s one of them.

Inevitably, Mademoiselle C is going to be compared to The September Issue, and you to Anna Wintour. How do you feel about being compared to her?
I was compared to Anna for many years. But I worked with her. I was working for her, and I think she’s a very tough woman, but she’s very honest. She’s a hard worker, and she and Grace [Coddington] have a lot of passion. And you feel passion in Mademoiselle C, too. Totally different, though. Vogue is the biggest magazine in the world; they have a lot of money. For our first issue, we had four people doing the magazine, but we have the same passion. Continue Reading “Carine Roitfeld Opens the Book” »