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August 27 2014

styledotcom Has the time come to rethink the fashion show? stylem.ag/1rAdMtO @BlackFrame pic.twitter.com/wjQS7A4aqD

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11 posts tagged "Carlos Quirarte"

Summer Friday: Weekend ‘Tauk With The Smile’s Matt Kliegman and Carlos Quirarte

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BARNEYS NEW YORK Hosts LOU LIVE in Celebration of the Fall 2013 Campaign CollaborationLike the George Gershwin song goes, “Summertime, and the livin’ is easy.” Especially if your workweek is cut short thanks to “Summer Fridays.” The extra hours go a long way in making every weekend seem like a holiday. If you’re short on inspiration for your own Summer Fridays, just look to our new season-long series in which we ask industry people with cool jobs to share how they’ll be spending their free afternoons.

Those who enjoy their meals at The Smile and their nights out at The Jane and The Westway will be happy to hear that this summer the duo behind all of those downtown institutions is headed out east. All summer long, Matt Kliegman and Carlos Quirarte will be keeping Montauk full with a residency at the restaurant at Ruschmeyer’s. And they aren’t just bringing their culinary know-how to the hotel and bar—their Montreal-style Black Seed bagels will also be on offer. Though it seems that Quirarte and Kliegman’s summer weekends will be spent working, here’s what they’ll really be doing.

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Carlos Quirarte: “At the beach! Because weeknights can run late at The Jane and The Westway, it’s nice to head to Montauk for the weekends. The Smile runs the restaurant at Ruschmeyer’s along with local chef Roy Wohlars, so it’s a good excuse to get out of the city and enjoy a weekend of great food with friends. If we get out east early, I like to stop by Melet Mercantile to see what Bob has in stock from week to week. They’re neighbors to the hotel, and his inventory is constantly changing as he sources new items throughout the summer.”

Matt Kliegman: “A perfect summer Friday would consist of yoga in Montauk with my fiancée, Sophie, followed by a delicious brunch. I’d probably order a blue crab eggs Benedict and banana pancakes from our menu—important to have both. Then enjoy a Bloody Caesar (it’s like a Bloody Mary, but with gin and Clamato juice) in a hammock by the bay and a game of life-size Jenga. But that’s the ideal; in the real world, there’s traffic on Montauk Highway, and brunch at Ruschmeyer’s is only served on Saturday and Sunday…”

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Photo: BFAnyc.com; Courtesy of Ruschmeyer’s

Is The Fashion World Ready To Embrace—Gasp—Food?

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Style.com contributing editor and party reporter Darrell Hartman circles the city and, occasionally, the globe in the line of duty. In a new column, he reports on the topics—whatever they may be at whatever given moment—that are stirring the social set.

“Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels,” Kate Moss famously said. Lord knows a good deal of the fashion world agrees with her. But fashion also responds to what’s going on in culture—and with all the foodie-ism out there these days, shouldn’t the Champagne-and-cigarettes diet seem a bit passé?

Bon Appetit thinks so. Since GQ alum Adam Rapoport took over as editor about a year and a half ago, the mag has adopted a new focus on food as an indispensable part of the stylish life, peeking into the dining rooms of fashion personalities such as the Missoni family and A.P.C.’s Jean Touitou to help its case. So when Rapoport & Co. threw a dinner a few weeks ago with help from recent profile subjects the Marden sisters and the in-demand interior designer John Derian, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to do examine the topic.

Hugo Guinness’s anecdotal evidence suggested that fashion’s higher-ups are more or less deaf to all that enthusiastic noise coming out of the foodie world. “Daphne couldn’t care less about food,” he reported, referring to his sister. And it was with little relish (so to speak) that he described the cuisine that one noted fashion hostess serves up at her dinner parties: “Always steak or fish, and horribly cooked.” But there’s a new guard, too, and in New York few people embody it as well as Matt Kliegman and Carlos Quirarte. They made a name for themselves as nightlife guys with a talent for marshaling the city’s cool kids, but in recent years they’ve gotten that same crowd to stop by for lunch at The Smile’s two downtown outposts with a menu that’s “healthy and comfort-y,” as Quirarte described it during cocktails at Bon App‘s dinner. This summer, they’re enlisting young restaurateur (and ex-boyfriend of Harley Viera-Newton) James Cruickshank to grill up late-night burgers at Westway. “I do think food is a bigger part of popular downtown culture,” offered Melia Marden (pictured), who’s head chef at The Smile and had put together the Mediterranean-flavored menu. “It’s very ingrained with what’s fashionable now—it’s not so separate.” Jean-Marc Houmard, who’s managed to lure Indochine vets over to his trendy new place, Acme, would probably second that.

A week later, as we were both heading up to a dinner in Istanbul, Cecilia Dean suggested to me that fashion absorbs trends in its own way and that when it comes to food, the relevant idea at the moment is the rather general one of eco-friendliness. “Food doesn’t need to be cool in the eyes of fashion people,” she said. In other words, no trendy chefs, pig parts, and cooking techniques: the fashion world’s plate is full enough.

Photo: Evan Sung / Courtesy of Bon Appetit

Dinner On The House

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Fashion week presents a particular problem to any scheduler: When? “Fashion week’s so nuts,” designer Waris Ahluwalia admitted. “I didn’t have an open night.” So when he went to host an “intimate” (25—which turned into 45—person) dinner to celebrate his presentation at CIRCA’s Lincoln Center accessories lounge, he decided to bat cleanup, and invite friends to supper after the end of the week. It worked. Last night, CIRCA CEO Chris Del Gatto and Stephanie Winston Wolkoff hosted Johan Lindeberg, Scott Campbell, Veronica Webb, Sophie Théallet, Aaron Young, Terence Koh, Carlos Quirarte, and Ahluwalia’s mother, Darshan (“the guest of honor, always”) piled into Tiny’s in Tribeca for a last-minute dinner toasting House of Waris’ Spring jewelry and scarf collections. “A downtown celebration for an uptown exhibition,” he called it.

The collection being celebrated marks the second time that the House of Waris—known largely for its jewelry—has forayed into scarves. At a follow-up visit at his studio today, the designer explained that the two categories only seem different. They’re both, he reasoned, about keeping craftsmanship alive for a new generation—of craftspeople, as well as of customers. (The Rajastani embroiderers who work on his hand-loomed cashmere scarves now have their hands so full from his business that they’ve stopped working with any other.) This season sees a major uptick in the number of scarf designs offered, with many motifs carrying over from the jewelry collection. They range from the simple—a gorgeous plain taupe cashmere scarf with embroidered border—to the ornate, with chains picked out in contrast thread weaving their way over the whole. They have a richness—and a price tag—consistent with the hours of work they take to complete. But luckily for entry-level fans, batik-dyed cotton-silk scarves start at $300.

Photo: Patrick McMullan

Surf And The City

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Skate and surf photographer Ari Marcopoulos has become an ersatz documentarian of the often hidden world of action sports, turning his lens on any subject who truly loves spending time on a board. During last night’s Dark Sun exhibition, co-hosted by Saturdays Surf, Marcopoulos collaborated with the Nike Stadium on the Bowery to create a gritty, DIY installation. “I was asked by Nike to do an exhibition about East Coast surfing,” said Marcopoulos. “They didn’t want to style it, which is rare these days—I had freedom to do what I wanted.”

Celebrating casually pinned black-and-white prints depicting some of their own, a crowd pushed in for a live performance by Hanni El Khatib with both their boards and babies in tow, perching on the installation’s scuffed skate ramps. A cross section of sport and cultural attendees, including curator/publisher Tim Barber, the Smile’s Carlos Quirarte, and art mogul Tim Nye, showed up. Nike Stadium manager Ryan Giese explained the transient nature of both the scene and the art. “There’s nothing glamorous about it, the art will all come down in two weeks, the sculpture inside will be gone, and Ari’s photos are photocopies—they’ll be thrown away,” he said. “There’s no agenda in this world.”

Standing beside monitors scrolling the blue flicker of a surf video and surveying the relaxed partygoers, Marcopoulos agreed. “It wasn’t so much about finding big waves. It was about having people who are fanatic about surfing just doing what they do.”

Photos: Ari Marcopoulos; Courtesy Photo

Go Westway, Young Men

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Between all the prep work, production, and execution, there’s a lot that goes into a fashion show. So it’s easy to see why after wrapping up their men’s and women’s Fall 2011 collections, the duo behind Rag & Bone were ready to celebrate, and at a former strip club, no less.

“You only have so much control over the process and once everything is set into motion, you just have to go with it,” co-founder Marcus Wainwright said at the Westway last night. “It’s also a relief to be finished and we’re really happy that it turned out the way it did,” Wainwright added on their women’s show earlier in the evening. Put more simply, his partner in design David Neville quipped to well-wishers, “It feels awesome.”

And the crowd certainly felt the celebration mode. The music was pumping, though the stripper poles center stage were bare save for a few bold partying souls. There were, however, plenty of eye-catching ladies at the Matt Kliegman and Carlos Quirarte-owned spot. Notably, Hanne Gaby Odiele (pictured, center), who also walked Rag & Bone’s runway, pointed out, “The week just started and look at me, I’m out. I’m going to regret this tomorrow morning.” Lucky for her pumpkin coach, er taxi, she headed home just before midnight.

Photo: Luca Cannoniere/GoRunway.com