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July 25 2014

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15 posts tagged "Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele"

The Morning After: Our EIC Recaps Yesterday’s Action

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JEREMY SCOTT Fall 2014 Fashion Show

In the end, perhaps fashion isn’t so complicated. It boils down to this: How do I find my signature and how do I develop it over time? Three things that people have said to me on this subject have stuck in my mind:

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele (stylist): “I get inspiration from Mr. Alaïa, Mr. Lagerfeld. They know, you know? They know. They are not like all these young designers who change every six months. I think this is strange, because when you have talent inside, you never really change.”

Azzedine Alaïa (designer): “It’s inconceivable to me that someone creative can have a new idea every two months. Because if I have one new idea in a year, I thank heaven.”

Riccardo Tisci (designer), speaking approvingly of Hedi Slimane’s tenure at Saint Laurent: “I think Hedi, he wrote his first chapter [i.e., at Dior Homme] in a capital of fashion, and then he took his time off, and then he started from the same page. It’s like when you go to bed and you’re reading a book: You do the little corner, and then the night after, you start from the same page. And the aesthetic that he does really belongs to him. For sure, it is something that doesn’t look like anybody else, and that’s what I like.”

These thoughts were thrown into particularly sharp relief during a busy day of shows in New York yesterday.

MICHAEL KORS
What’s more remarkable about Kors: the fact that he’s now worth a billion dollars or the fact that, after three decades in business, he isn’t resting on his laurels? With his last two collections, he has brought his vision of American luxury into razor-sharp focus.

JEREMY SCOTT
A very different designer from Kors, of course, but in his own way as American as apple pie or Pop Art. Scott has done what you do if you have your own signature: lived through a few seasons where he enjoyed the support of the faithful—and it’s some faithful; he draws the liveliest crowd in town (hey there, Jared Leto)—but didn’t have the full attention of the fashion press. Thanks to his recent appointment as creative director of Moschino, he’s firmly back in the media spotlight. He didn’t waste the opportunity, delivering a collection that riffed confidently on two great American pastimes: sex and sports.

HUGO BOSS
How do you define the signature of a commercial juggernaut, best known for its menswear, which is now making a serious push into womenswear? That’s Jason Wu’s brief at Hugo Boss. He’s started to do it with the collateral: an Inez and Vinoodh-shot campaign; Gwyneth Paltrow as the face of the fragrance. And his debut collection? As Nicole Phelps said in her review, “Wu’s challenge going forward will be to maintain the Boss polish while figuring out ways to loosen up and have a bit more fun.”

ANNA SUI
I would be remiss not to mention Sui in this recap. She is one of the treasures of the New York calendar. Here’s Tim Blanks on what made her latest collection such a decadent delight.

REED KRAKOFF
Krakoff has been giving this subject a great deal of thought lately. After a few collections that felt the anxiety of European influence, he is now focused on creating his version of American luxury. Read Nicole Phelps’ review here.

PROENZA SCHOULER
Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez were part of a pack of young New York designers who broke through in the last decade. When they celebrated their tenth anniversary a couple of years ago, they decided to drill down on their label’s identity, starting with a powerful but understated new logo. Their aesthetic, now reliably their own, is rooted in the contemporary New York art world. It’s no coincidence that yesterday’s show took place at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, a gallery in the West Village.

IT’S RALPH, THOUGH
As it happens, I’m writing this after seeing Ralph Lauren’s show on this snowy Thursday morning. Lauren showed looks from his Polo line alongside his top-end collection today, and the move invigorated him. These clothes were as clear and direct as a Hemingway sentence. If America didn’t exist, Ralph Lauren would have had to invent it.

Photo: Patrick McMullan Company 

Jeremy Scott: The New Man At Moschino

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Jeremy ScottMoschino, which celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in Milan last month, has hired Jeremy Scott to be its new creative director. The 39-year-old L.A.-based designer replaces Rossella Jardini, who has headed up the label since 1994, when the house founder, Franco Moschino, died. Scott will make his runway debut at Moschino’s Fall 2014 show in February next year. In an e-mail, Aeffe chairman Massimo Ferretti said, “I am enthusiastic about this significant change, as our goal is to inject new energy into our Group in keeping with the changes already in place with other Aeffe brands such as Philosophy, Emanuel Ungaro, Pollini, and Cédric Charlier.” Scott will continue to design his own label, which he launched in 1997. With a rebellious streak at least a mile wide—at one of his early shows, he tossed coins printed with his face at the audience—Scott is a savvy match for Moschino, a label known for its irony and irreverence. “It’s the closing of one chapter and the beginning of a new one,” he said via phone this morning. Here, the Missouri farm boy who Karl Lagerfeld once took under wing discusses his plans for Moschino as he ushers it into its fourth decade.

There are so many synergies between you and the Moschino brand. How did you feel when you were approached?
I was really excited. For me, one of the key elements of Moschino is humor. It’s one of the few houses that has humor, and it’s the same thing for me. Another one of the bonding elements is their written messages that express thoughts and twist ideas. We share an obsession with poking fun at fashion. Whimsy, also.

Were you a Moschino fan before this offer came through?
I was. The ironic thing is, during my last year of college, when I was at Pratt, I interned for the Moschino press office, for Michelle Stein here in New York. Yeah, it’s kind of a fairy-tale story. I was the intern, and now I’m running the company.

You once said you turned down job offers from Pucci, Versace, Paco Rabanne, and Chloé. Why did you say yes to this one?
It’s two things. At the beginning of my career, I felt it was really important to establish my own name. I feel like my own brand, my own DNA, is created and solid now, and I’ve built a global fan base. I don’t have that fear I used to have of the possibility of me getting lost in someone else’s house. On the one hand, I’m different now; the other has to do with the brand. It’s hand in glove. When I heard it, it was like, “Oh my God, yeah, of course.” This is so natural for me; I can take this so many different ways.

When did Moschino come to you?
I was contacted in July. It was very effortless, actually. I feel like they were pretty fixated on the idea and certain about me being the right person. I’ll continue to do my own line, as well as my Adidas collaboration. I’ve been working very vigorously to be ahead of my normal procrastinated self in anticipation of having a larger workload.

Have you been spending time in Italy?
Not yet. Other than meeting them in July, I’ve gone to Milan maybe two or three times. I’m not very familiar with the city, so that in itself will be an adventure for me. I literally don’t even know where to get toothpaste.
I’m going to be there the entire month of November—to understand how they work and to meet my design team, which is already in place. But I’m a very modern boy. I work a lot through the Internet. That’s one of the reasons I moved from Paris to Los Angeles in the first place, actually. Nothing was being made in Paris except the things in my own studio. I could be anywhere. Now that’s even more the case with iPhones and gadgets. But at the same time, I want to see the archives, to learn the house, and to be physically there, as well. We’ll see. Whatever it’s going to take for it to feel right, that’s all I’m concerned about. I want to do a good job.

How does it feel to be headed back to Europe?
I started my career in Paris, so it feels like home. I’m excited about learning more about Milan, Milan life, and Italian style. I’ve only been to Rome once, when Karl [Lagerfeld] brought me. The proximity of everything—I mean, Italy is the size of California, I can spend the weekends sightseeing. I’ve never been to Venice…I’ve always wanted to go, and now I have the perfect opportunity.

On the other hand, California, where you currently work, seems to be having a moment. Does it feel like there’s something going on there?
I am the pioneer, I got here first. I even remember Tom [Ford] saying to me, “I can’t believe you’re moving there, I wish I could do it.” I love it here. I feel inspired, it’s a wonderful way of creating for me—it just feels really good. I don’t really think about how [it's having a moment], but I realize it through other people’s eyes. All the stories about [the new boutique] Just One Eye, all the attention they’re getting. Other people are focusing here. The only thing I can think of that’s different now than when I first moved here is that there’s a younger generation that’s come up, that has become part of the look of the city. There’s been so much more enthusiasm about fashion and style from this new generation of kids. Continue Reading “Jeremy Scott: The New Man At Moschino” »

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele Talks Image-Making in the Digital Age

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Matin Zad

Stylist Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele knows a thing or two about fashion imagery. You know all those photographs from the late eighties and nineties of supermodels like Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington, Naomi Campbell, and Claudia Schiffer decked out in Versace, Chanel, and piles upon piles of gilded baubles? Well, we have her to thank for those.

De Dudzeele’s reputation for creating vivacious, lasting images is undoubtedly one of the reasons Bottega Veneta tapped her to sit on the judging panel of its 2013 New Exposure Photography Competition (she’s joined by heavy hitters such as Craig McDean, Guido Palau, Andrew Bolton, and Bottega’s own Tomas Maier). Launched last year in an effort to discover and support emerging talents, the competition features five standout finalists this year. And tonight, at New York’s Openhouse Gallery, Collin Kelly, Emma Powell, Masha Sardari, Matin Zad, or Shae DeTar will be announced as the 2013 victor. The finalists’ photographs debut here. And below, in between shoots and shows, de Dudzeele weighs in on photography in the digital age, discusses the overuse of Photoshop, and offers aspiring image-makers some invaluable advice.

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How has the process of image-making changed throughout the course of your career? And what’s remained the same?

Good ones are good ones! The talented people will still stay the same—they have it in their [guts]. What’s changed is that the focus on set has gone from looking at the subject…to looking at a monitor. Nowadays, people sometimes forget to have fun and to have their own point of view. Fashion photography still has, and needs a lot of, original ideas. The digital is just a tool.

What qualities do you feel make a successful image in this digital age?

Energy, capturing a moment, composition, authenticity, creativity!

What traits did you look for while judging the Bottega competition?

I was looking for a personal eye, a unique image, a sensitivity, and honesty… not a reproduction of something done before.

Is there anything you miss about a more classic approach to photography? And, conversely, is there anything you really love about images?

I miss the happy surprise! I miss the focus on the subject and the attention to details. It used to be that nothing could get “removed” or fixed afterwards. When you had it, you knew it. Digital is good to build a story, as you can work on layout and cropping, then. Technology can help a bad photographer get better, but ultimately, good photography does not need to be reworked.

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Is Photoshop used too much today? When do you feel it’s appropriate?

Yes! Moving around the filter and switching heads, hands, arms, everything, this is not the essence of a unique photograph. This is not real talent. Photoshopping is appropriate to enhance a beauty that’s already there—to help the dream come true.

Have your aesthetic values changed since the digital embrace?
My aesthetic has not changed. I love the girls, the fashion, the joy, the energy, and the ideas. Creating fun, iconic images still is the goal.

What advice would you give to emerging image-makers, whether they’re stylists or photographers, today?
Be you! Don’t over-reference. And love it! Sometimes, what people think is bad…is good.

Is there anything you’d like to add?
It’s only fashion!

Photos: Matin Zad, Emma Powell, Collin Kelly, Shat DeTar, Masha Sardari

The Daily‘s Night

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The Daily Front Row First Annual Fashion Media Awards sponsored by Samsung

Friday evening, underneath the massive crystal chandeliers and amid the rococo decor of the Upper East Side’s Harlow restaurant, fashion’s boldfaced names gathered to dole out The Daily Front Row‘s first annual Fashion Media Awards. The vibe was touchingly familiar, with Tim Gunn introducing TV Personality of the Year Heidi Klum (“I met Heidi nine years ago, and I was a trembling, nervous, sweating, sputtering battling wreck—and I sustained that same demeanor for many, many seasons of Project Runway,” he recalled), Marc Jacobs speaking for the Editor in Chief of the Year winner, Grazia UK‘s Jane Bruton (“She’s the perfect combination of smart, bubbly, and fun—and from what I hear, sometimes a little too much fun,” he joked), and Lady Gaga, in a frenetic finale, presenting Stephen Gan with his Fashion Magazine of the Year award.

Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele introduced Model of the Year, Social Media, Karlie Kloss, and reminisced about their first shoot together with Steven Meisel, while Jessica Biel and Elle‘s Joe Zee (winner of the Creative Director of the Year) joked about their “first time” (i.e., first cover) together in 2007, and the discovery of Zee’s “sick hip-hop dance” moves in the years that followed. Later, Bruce Weber came to the stage to speak for longtime friend and Fashion Scoop of the Year winner Ingrid Sischy, who was recognized for her John Galliano feature in Vanity Fair. He was quick to emphasize the significance of the fact that—in the age of insta-everything—her story took two years to complete.

“I think it’s actually a great thing to do a Fashion Media Awards, because fashion media really are a part of the business of fashion—and really help in shaping and creating the image of fashion,” said Jay Manuel between texts to DVF (“Looking forward to that show!”). “The people who go behind the scenes typically need to have the spotlight shot on them, so people know who is behind the images.”

Photo: Courtesy Photo

416 Pages of Pucci

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On Wednesday evening, at its recently christened Madison Avenue flagship, Pucci invited friends such as Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, Karla Otto, and Bibhu Mohapatra to fete the new edition of Taschen’s Emilio Pucci. The lushly illustrated tome—initially released as an oversize, limited-run epic covered in vintage fabric—has been given new life as a 416-page coffee-table book. Four different covers are available in Pucci’s signature acid-hued, kaleidoscopic prints, each of which was plucked from the archives. “We all believe that at a moment when the world is becoming bigger, it’s nice to make sure that people can understand where you come from,” offered Laudomia Pucci—Emilio’s daughter and the house’s vice president.

Style.com caught up with the book’s author (and Financial Times fashion editor), Vanessa Friedman. In between inscribing copies, she dished on what she believes makes Pucci so timeless. “It’s really about an attitude, as opposed to a particular style,” she said. “It’s not about a silhouette. It’s about a way of existing in your clothes, and a freedom that your clothes give you to move and feel good about yourself.”

Emilio Pucci is available now at Pucci boutiques, and at www.taschen.com.

Photo: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com