Style.com

July 25 2014

styledotcom The trend that's just as much about attitude as it is about the clothes: stylem.ag/WLdgvf pic.twitter.com/tjOpuVNrz2

Subscribe to Style Magazine
38 posts tagged "Carol Lim"

EXCLUSIVE: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim on the Brand’s New London Shop, Baby OC, and More

-------

Opening Ceremony
Opening CeremonyOpening Ceremony’s latest addition to its growing empire, a shop at London’s Ace Hotel, officially opens its doors to the public today. “It’s a small store, but it’s a very well curated selection,” said the brand’s co-founder, Carol Lim, of the new Shoreditch outpost. (This will function as the primary OC store in London while the King Street location undergoes renovation.)

In the mix, there are offerings from OC’s roster of popular labels like Hood by Air and Raf Simons, the main OC line, and store exclusive pieces (the DKNY for Opening Ceremony collection will make its debut at the store, ahead of the September 1 official launch). There are also goods from London’s rising stars, such as Faustine Steinmetz and Marques’Almeida. “We have been big supporters of some of these labels, like Marques’Almeida, for a while, so a lot of the product is really special to us,” said Lim.

Opening Ceremony

Lim, for her part, didn’t make it to London for the opening: “I’m at home—my baby is due any day now.” She admitted that she and her OC co-founder, Humberto Leon, have babies on the mind these days. “Funny you should ask, we are working on baby gear right now. I also have a 20-month-old and Humberto has twins; it’s just a big part of our everyday lives at this point, so it makes a lot of sense.” More on that at a later date.

That’s not all they’ve got up their sleeve. “As our Opening Ceremony line continues to grow, we are really interested in exploring what a mono-brand retail format could look like,” said Lim. “We have always had our brand out with the 300-plus other brands that we carry, but we are hoping to switch things up a bit. In the next year, we are most likely going to roll out a new retail experience here in the States.”

Here, we have an exclusive first look inside the new Max Lamb-designed store.

Opening Ceremony Shoreditch at Ace Hotel, London, 106 Shoreditch High Street. For more info, visit www.openingceremony.us.

Photo: Jamie McGregor Smith 

Designer Diary: Steven Tai’s Postcard From Hyères

-------

Last weekend, London-based designer Steven Tai headed to the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography. As the 2012 winner of the festival’s prestigious Chloé award, the designer has a unique perspective on the fair. Here, he shares the details of his trip exclusively with Style.com.

Steven Tai

Started in 1985 by Jean-Pierre Blanc, the Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography has served as a launching pad for new talents for nearly three decades. This year, Humberto Leon and Carol Lim, the creative directors of Kenzo and founders of Opening Ceremony, were the head of fashion jury for the twenty-ninth edition of the festival. As the winner of the 2012 Chloé award, I had the opportunity to show my Fall ’14 collection as part of The Formers exhibition, where previous winners of the festival present their latest work and touch base with the community that started their careers. This year, Kenta Matsushige took first prize in the fashion category, and I was lucky enough to get a first look at her collection.

Steven Tai

After disembarking the Eurostar, I made a quick pit stop at Totem’s new office in Paris to pick up my collection.

Steven Tai

A skip, a hop, a five-hour train ride, and a cab later, we arrived at the Villa Noailles, where the festival would take place the next day. The sunny weather was the first sign that this would be an amazing year.

Steven Tai

Off to the catwalk space to have a nosy peek at the rehearsal for this year’s finalists. And of course the first thing I did was have a look at the lineup…

Steven Tai

…then it was over to the runway. An amazing giant door that the models walked through reminded me of one of my favorite childhood stories, Alice in Wonderland.

Steven Tai

Back to the hotel and it was time to start some hand-sewing. Well, sort of…

Steven Tai

The next morning, finalists had to present their collections to the jury. You can see the collections lined up in the tent behind all the models in hair and makeup. There was tension—someone’s destiny was at stake. And everyone in attendance was there to support the ten finalists as they pursued their dreams.

Steven Tai

Before settling in to see the finalists’ collections, I wandered around the villa and saw the Kenzo exhibition getting installed. It featured a mixture of vintage and current Kenzo pieces on rotating mannequins.

Steven Tai

After the nerve-racking presentation to the jury, the finalists showed their collections to the press. I had the pleasure of sitting in on the press presentation. It was so interesting to hear other designers’ thought processes.

Steven Tai

After another night of hand-sewing and five coffees, the showroom was ready to go—and so was I! Continue Reading “Designer Diary: Steven Tai’s Postcard From Hyères” »

Fashion Over Function: Why Wearable Tech Is the Worst

-------

Google GlassNews broke yesterday morning that Google has enlisted Luxottica—the company that crafts eyewear for such brands as Prada, Ray-Ban, Chanel, Versace, and beyond—to make Google Glass less hideous. That’s all good and fine—at least the Internet giant is placing an appropriate amount of importance on aesthetics. But I have to be honest: I am deeply tired of hearing about, writing about, and thinking about wearable tech. I have no desire to be hooked up to a device all day. The nonstop e-mail-induced vibrating of my iPhone already gives me heart palpitations, and I don’t need my rings, bracelets, and specs incessantly nagging me, too.

Considering Apple’s recent hires—Saint Laurent’s former CEO of special projects Paul Deneve and Burberry’s former CEO Angela Ahrendts—and Humberto Leon and Carol Lim’s partnership with Intel, wearable tech is no doubt about to explode. And it has the potential to generate big business among Millennials who are lost without their tablets, smartphones, and various other gadgets. I’m just not interested in participating in this particular big bang.

That’s not to say that wearable tech isn’t impressive from, well, you know, a tech standpoint. I find it mind-boggling that a Nike Fuel Band has the capacity to track your steps and calories burned, and then spit that information out into the World Wide Web. However, I’m unsure why the world (or the NSA, for that matter) needs to know your, or my, workout routine. Nor do I enjoy being bombarded on Facebook by everyone’s “humble brags” about how many miles they ran today. I’ve unfriended people for less. But I digress.

As someone who has dedicated my life to fashion, I refuse to compromise on the appearance of a garment or accessory. I’d much prefer to spend my wages on a decadent pair of low-tech vintage sunnies than on a mediocre style with Wi-Fi.

Furthermore, when is enough tech enough? Despite the fact that it doubles as my career, fashion is my escape—and I think a lot of people feel that way. When I slip on a new dress or place my favorite hat upon my head, I get butterflies in my stomach. All my troubles dissolve (if only for an instant), and it’s as though I’ve been transported to my own personal sartorial oasis. Why on earth would I trade in those moments of bliss for a flashing frock with 4G capabilities?

And what’s so great about being connected all the time, anyway? Forever burned in my mind is an election party I attended in 2012. The invitees were educated, opinionated, entertaining, and dynamic, but for a good portion of the evening, I had to check their Twitter feeds in order to get their thoughts on the polls. What could have been a riveting few hours of discussion was diminished to a silent, nonstop tweet-fest. While I sat there with my iPhone tucked in my handbag (my mother always told me that it was rude to stare at one’s phone in social situations because it makes your company feel as though they’re not important), mumbling to myself, all I could think was, What a waste. Can you imagine how much worse this will become if we’re not required to take the extra step of reaching into our pockets to tweet, Instagram, e-mail, Facebook, etc.? If the Internet is latched onto our wrists or eyes, will we even speak to each other anymore?

Perhaps I’m a Luddite. And you know what? I’m OK with that. I’d prefer to be stuck in the last century than to look and live like some kind of Star Trekkian android.

Even so, I wish nothing but the best of luck to Google and Luxottica in making high-fashion face computers.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

Insta-Gratification

-------

In the age of Instagram, all it takes is a smartphone to achieve a photo finish, be it filtered or #nofilter-ed. That’s why Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, is rounding up our favorite snaps and bringing them into focus. See below for today’s top shots.

Thursday, March 13

Blurred lines need not apply.

Fact: Girls just wanna have fun.

And the award for coolest custom kicks goes to…

No one rocks classic red quite like Dita von Teese.

Coasting with Karen Elson. Continue Reading “Insta-Gratification” »

LVMH Fashion Prize Finalists Announced

-------

Suno, Craig Green, Hood by Air

Back in November, we broke the news of LVMH’s new 300,000-euro LVMH Prize for Young Designers. According to WWD, 1,211 talents applied, and today the short list of thirty semifinalists, who will go on to present their collections to an esteemed panel of experts during Paris fashion week, were announced. CG by Chris Gelinas, Tim Coppens, Suno by Erin Beatty and Max Osterweis, Shayne Oliver’s Hood by Air, and Creatures of the Wind by Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters are among the New York-based brands that made the cut. Notable international names include London’s Craig Green, Simone Rocha, Thomas Tait, Meadham Kirchhoff (designed by Edward Meadham and Benjamin Kirchhoff), and Marques’Almeida (designed by Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida); Paris’ Jacquemus (by Simon Porte Jacquemus) and Atto (by Julien Dossena); Rome’s Stella Jean; and more.

Following the Paris presentations, judges will select ten hopefuls from the group of thirty, and these finalists will continue on to compete for the big prize. The decision, which will be made by a group including Nicolas Ghesquière, Marc Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld, Humberto Leon, Carol Lim, Phoebe Philo, Raf Simons, and Riccardo Tisci, will be announced in May.

Photo: IndigitalImages.com