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July 11 2014

styledotcom Modesty was the dominant theme during the second day of Berlin fashion week: stylem.ag/1lXloxm pic.twitter.com/U4SjhEhKlD

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37 posts tagged "Carol Lim"

Fashion and Function: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim Talks Teaming Up With Intel

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Humberto Leon and Carol LimGoogle’s not the only company that can play the tech-meets-fashion game. Last night at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich announced the corporation’s new plan to produce functional tech accessories that are both wearable and aesthetically pleasing. Impossible? Not when you have Opening Ceremony’s Humberto Leon and Carol Lim on your team. The duo will design a smart bracelet, which, currently under development, will be unveiled at a yet-to-be-revealed date.

But one bracelet does not a revolution make, so in addition to OC, Intel has tapped Barneys (who will sell the forthcoming wristband and future products) and the CFDA (who will help emerging designers get on Intel’s wearable gadget bandwagon) to assist with the project.

Earlier today, Ayse Ildeniz, Intel’s VP of Business Development and Strategy of New Devices, hosted a panel to discuss the push. She was joined by OC’s Bettina Chin (Director of Special Projects) and Su Barber (Art Director), the CFDA’s Adam Roth (Director of Strategic Partnerships), and Barneys’ Matthew Woolsey (SVP of Digital). The takeaway from their chat? While functionality is key, the products have got to look great (if you recall, one of the biggest complaints about Google Glass, pairs of which were worn on Diane von Furstenberg’s Spring ’13 runway, was that it wasn’t exactly the sleekest thing on the block). “If wearables are to take off, it has to be an industry effort, and fashion and aesthetics have to be involved,” Ildeniz told Style.com after the panel. Woolsey concurred. “The design element is paramount to the way in which our customer engages with [the product],” he said. It’s worth noting that, through this project, Barneys will become the first luxury retailer to carry wearables.

So can Leon and Lim do for wearable tech what they did for Kenzo—that is to say, make it the cool set’s new must-have? Unfortunately, some blizzard-induced flight delays prevented Lim from attending the conference and addressing that in person. However, with a little help from a smartphone, Style.com was able to catch up with Lim about why OC and Intel are a natural fit, how she plans to make wearable tech covetable, and how her collaborative device will not only allow people to plug in, but offer them the option to turn off.

Why did you and Humberto say yes to the Intel project?
Technology in all forms has been really important to us, not only in our store and our collections, but also in terms of online retail. We had been watching the wearable technology space for quite some time before Intel approached us. We’d been thinking about how to incorporate [wearables] into our collection, so when this project came along, we thought it was a great opportunity. Intel represents such a strong force in technology, so we were happy to lend our design sensibility, and it makes sense to partner with someone whom we consider to be the expert.

Do you feel confident that the end result will resonate with the Opening Ceremony customer?
Absolutely. If you look at how people operate today, they use so many devices and applications. I think [wearable technology] is the next step in terms of how people interact. Your phone’s generally by your side, but you don’t always get a chance to look at it, so I think this product is a natural progression.

As far as stereotypes go, “fashion” people and “tech” people are about as opposite as you can get. How do you hope to bridge this perceived gap? And considering you design for Kenzo as well as Opening Ceremony, do you see wearable tech translating into luxury fashion?
When Intel approached us, they basically said, “We’re experts in technology, and we would rely on you to be experts in the field of creating an item that can stand on its own—an item that is beautiful, and that people will want.” I think that marriage of two partners with different talents is going to be very interesting. And you’re right, the fashion industry has been slow to adopt wearable technology. But I think that’s because it’s usually coming only from a technology point of view, rather than a combination of tech and design aesthetic. Our focus will be to create a covetable item that someone would want to wear regardless of the tech aspect. So I think this collaboration with Intel will stand out from other devices. Continue Reading “Fashion and Function: Opening Ceremony’s Carol Lim Talks Teaming Up With Intel” »

It’s a Drag, Drag, Drag, Drag World

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PS1 Dral Ball

Leave it to the queens to do Halloween in style. Last night at MoMa PS1, Humberto Leon and Carol Lim along with Luis Venegas of Candy magazine hosted an art-meets-fashion Halloween drag ball, complete with an old-school pageant. “This is Miss America on steroids,” proclaimed MC Ladyfag before letting the contestants loose on a makeshift catwalk.

Later, Ladyfag explained, “It’s really a celebration of a culture that always dresses up. Most of the people here do this every day. It’s nice for people to stop and think what really goes into all of this all the time—how much work it is being a drag queen!” The work was evident in the hundreds of elaborate, detailed transformations—a sparkling, towering mummy bride; a red-lip-smeared Horn of Plenty; and co-host Melissa Burns as Prince. Also in the crowd: a well-disguised Michael Stipe and Justin Bond. “This look? I wanted to make it a bit Saint Laurent grunge, but at the same time I thought it would be cool to have something that would remind people a bit of Norman Bates’ mother—Norman from Psycho,” explained Venegas of his ladylike, lace-collared flower frock. “You know I come from Spain, so to be in New York celebrating Halloween with a drag ball is quite amazing for me!”

“It’s a total mess, but it’s great!” added Swedish pop star Robyn from beside the tequila bar. “I just think people are having a good time.”

Photo: Charles Roussel

Californication

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Californication From the streets of New York to the Paris ateliers, fashion is in a California state of mind. For proof, look at all the references to West Coast skate, surf, rave, grunge, and lowrider subcultures on the Spring ’14 runways. Hedi Slimane, who was fetishizing Los Angeles and its underground scenes long before he landed at Saint Laurent, is at least partly responsible for this mass migration, but Kate and Laura Mulleavy deserve credit, too. After taking us “back home to Santa Cruz” last season, the Rodarte sisters’ L.A.-inspired lineup was full of chola-girl plaid shirts styled with snapbacks, satin bras, studded suspenders, and fringed skirts. Tommy Hilfiger, meanwhile, transformed Pier 94 into an epic beachscape with a boardwalk runway that complemented his sun-kissed, sporty clothes; Humberto Leon and Carol Lim channeled SoCal street racing at Opening Ceremony; and Jeremy Laing described his Spring collection as “Malibu Beach Barbie goes to a rave.”

Here, a slideshow of our favorite California-inspired Spring looks.

Words of the Wild

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Eco-aware looks from Vivienne Westwood Red Label, Christopher Kane, and Kenzo

Crusader is as much of a job descriptor for Vivienne Westwood as fashion designer. And among her agendas, no cause resonates more acutely than her crusade to fight climate change. For Spring ’14, the designer sent out models in plastered-and-fractured makeup at Vivienne Westwood Red Label, the effect of which she likened to animals being “trapped” in the headlights. One look, a strapless brocade dress in pale gold and lavender, topped a ratty T-shirt that read “Climate.” Here, the message rang loud and clear. Moreover, Westwood gave out pre-addressed postcards to U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, instructing editors to write down their own ecological apprehensions.

But Westwood wasn’t the only designer who expressed her environmental concerns this season. Christopher Kane showed metallic teardrop cutouts on dresses—”Sterilized petals,” he called them. He also offered diagrammatic outlines of botanicals, paired with blocky letters spelling “Petal” and “Flower.” His wares appeared to place a conscious emphasis on the synthetic over the natural. At Dior, Raf Simons printed slogans such as “Alice Garden” and “Primrose Path” along brightly colored numbers that seemed to suggest a kind of nuclear summer, mutated wisteria included.

Shifting from terra firma to the big blue sea, Kenzo‘s Carol Lim and Humberto Leon addressed the problem of overfishing: In addition to a few fun aquatic prints, there was a T-shirt that read “No Fish, No Nothing.” “The challenges facing our oceans are a global concern,” Leon told Style.com. “The shirt is an effort to help raise awareness through fashion’s strong voice.” A portion of the garment’s proceeds will go to the Blue Marine Foundation, which battles fish-stock depletion worldwide.

Photos: Courtesy of Vivienne Westwood Red Label; IndigitalImages.com

Exclusive: Opening Ceremony Brings In A Bit Of Belgium For Fall

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Opening Ceremony's Humberto Leon and Raf Simons, as imagined by Deer DanaOpening Ceremony‘s world tour in style has taken it to Japan, Korea, the U.K., and Argentina. For its latest cultural tourism via fashion import, Humberto Leon and Carol Lim turned their attention to Belgium. For fall 2013, Opening Ceremony welcomes a new crop of Belgium-based designers to its ranks, many for the first time.

The timing is good. Fashion is in the grips of Belgo-mania, it seems. (I don’t say that just because I’ve contrived to make two trips to Antwerp in the past year.) Raf Simons may be going from strength to strength at Dior, but he’s helming the French-est of French lines from his native Antwerp. His namesake men’s collection will soon be on O.C.’s shelves. (He also sat down with Leon for a long interview coming soon to the store’s blog.) Dries Van Noten, one of the original members of the Belgian craze’s first wave in the eighties as part of the Antwerp Six, will be honored with a retrospective at Paris’ Musée Galliera this spring; before then, his men’s and women’s collections will come to O.C. for fall. Belgian cult favorite Veronique Branquinho returned from semi-retirement last season. Her work will be on offer, too. So will that of Belgium’s established lions, many of them underappreciated and understocked in the U.S. (Walter Van Beirendonck, Stephan Schneider), and of many of its up-and-coming guard (Woolmark winner Christian Wijnants, knit line Chauncey, former Cacharel designer Cédric Charlier). Leon and Lim even selected their favorites of the graduating class of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts.

“It has been especially exciting to put together this yearly focus, because we have the icons and the new masters of Belgium fashion as well as the fresh, young talents all in store,” they said.

Graphic: Deer Dana / Courtesy of Opening Ceremony