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July 31 2014

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14 posts tagged "Caroline de Maigret"

Chunky Necklaces Are at the Top of the Fashion Food Chain

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Chains at ChanelThanks to the tastemaking powers of Nicolas Ghesquière and Gaia Repossi, five-fingered rings and tough ear cuffs have been all the rage for the past year or so. But judging from the recent Resort collections, the new jewelry must-have is a chunky chain. We spied statement-making metal necklaces that were equal parts punk and hip-hop bling at Chanel, Bottega Veneta, Givenchy, and Lanvin, among others. Jenni Kayne, for her part, piled on the gold strands for an extra dose of swag (let’s just say that Jay-Z himself would be jealous), while Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing, Bouchra Jarrar, and Hedi Slimane at Saint Laurent incorporated gleaming links as accents on their clothes. In addition to Rihanna, whose Céline ID choker has been in heavy rotation for some time now, cool girls such as Caroline de Maigret have taken a new liking to heavy-duty chokers. We’re betting they’ll be street-style status symbols at the Spring ’14 shows.

Here, a slide show of our favorite chains.

Helena Christensen’s Iron Girls

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Helena Cristensen

Matchesfashion.com is paying tribute to strong, independent women this week with “Iron Girl”—a series of portraits shot by Helena Christensen and Jen Carey for the September issue of Rika Magazine. The snaps star Julianne Moore, Dree Hemingway, Caroline de Maigret, Lucie de la Falaise, and, of course, Christensen, sporting “Iron Girl” sweaters, which, priced at about $178, will be sold exclusively at Matches starting tomorrow.

Julianne Moore by Helena ChristensenIt’s no secret that nineties supermodels are having a comeback, with Christy Turlington, Yasmin Le Bon, Naomi Campbell, and Elle Macpherson fronting a dizzying array of ad campaigns, magazine covers, and prime-time modeling shows. Christensen is no exception. She recently appeared in a seminude spread for FutureClaw magazine (which caused its Web site to crash) and has also been busy as a shutterbug, serving as Oxfam’s global photographer. “I have worked on both sides [of the camera] for over twenty years now and thoroughly enjoy the creative process of either,” Christensen told Style.com. “I have learned so much doing both jobs, and that knowledge has helped me evolve as a photographer and inspired me as a model,” she explained, noting that a Polaroid camera is her weapon of choice.”

Rika founder Ulrika offered that choosing the Iron Girl models was no easy task, but ultimately she looked for women who have “a keen sense of who they are. They have an understated but cool edge and an ageless style; they are the nonchalant women of the world who inspire the people around them.”

Matchesfashion.com will host an exhibition of the photographs on July 18.

Photo: Courtesy of Matchesfashion.com

Before Chanel Cruise, A Catch-Up With Coco

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The Karl caravan has arrived in Singapore. Lagerfeld and forty-seven models are set up at the city’s famous Raffles Hotel, the gorgeous nineteenth-century English-colonial hotel, with enough hardworking dressers, stylists, and global PR reps attending them to put you in mind of a postcolonial Downton Abbey. Today, they’ll put on Chanel’s Cruise show. But last night, it was a party for a prelude: a pair of short films, screened alfresco in the hotel courtyard, beside which Maugham and Hemingway sat in the Long Bar, sipping Singapore Slings.

Leave it to Lagerfeld to make not one, but two films. The preview and the movie: They just go together, he explained. So Women Only featured a raft of his favorite girls—Kati, Cara, Lindsey, Lina, Xiao Wen, Soo Joo, et al., all clad in Chanel Pre-Fall—piling into a movie theater for the debut of a new film. Then the film within the film: Naturally, it’s a little number by Lagerfeld. Once Upon a Time… takes us back a century, to the opening of Gabrielle Chanel’s shop in the French resort town of Deauville. It opens with a scene of two servant girls impugning the name of Chanel. “Who is Gabrielle Chanel?” they wonder as they wander past her shop. “I don’t know, but she has no taste.”

But he who laughs last laughs best. Business starts out slow for Coco Chanel (Keira Knightley, absent from this Singaporean affair, on her honeymoon) and her partner/confidante Aunt Adrienne (Clotilde Hesme), but the crème de la crème of Riviera society eventually come swishing through her door. That Chanel girl, the consensus eventually runs, she’s really got something.

So does her latter-day inheritor, Karl Lagerfeld. “I did everything,” Lagerfeld said after the applause had died down. “I designed the set, I made the costumes, I made the characters, I made the dialogue. I make everything—otherwise, I’m not interested. I could never work with somebody who makes the dialogue, because I want them to talk the way I’m thinking.” He built a town from scratch—the whole thing was shot at a Paris film studio—and assembled a cast of thousands. (Well, 160 extras, at least; but as Hesme laughed, “I think the budget is much larger than the film I did before.”) And he bravely tossed the book out and shot without a script, calling out lines just before takes and encouraging his actresses to improvise. A task like that separates the wheat from the chaff. And who knows, some stars may have been born. Lagerfeld saved special mention for Ashleigh Good, who played the Swedish actress Jacqueline Forzane, and he wasn’t the only one. “Keira was impressed by Ashleigh,” he said gravely. As for others—well, the catwalk is a fine consolation.

Lagerfeld is as new to filmmaking as many of his actresses, but Karl’s gals—out in force tonight to celebrate—were full of praise for their fledgling director. “It was great fun—it was a giant playground,” said Stella Tennant, fresh into town from the Met Gala, who played Lady de Grey, Oscar Wilde’s patroness. “He’s very fresh,” added Caroline de Maigret, who played the towering Russian ballerina Ida Rubinstein. (Lagerfeld made her even more towering by dismissing all but the shortest extras for her scene.) “He’s very enthusiastic, excited. He’s laughing, ‘Ah, brilliant, brilliant!’

“He gets excited by everything he doesn’t know,” she declared, stubbing out her cigarette—usually a hot-button issue in law-abiding Singapore, but Karl’s night, Karl’s rules. “That’s his power. That’s what drives him, the unknown.”

A New Fleece On Life For Shearling

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When temperatures dropped and snow started to fall during the recent menswear and couture collections in Paris, showgoers and the city itself were caught off guard. Try putting down salt next time, s’il vous plaît. But we’re not all complaints. The unexpected weather gave rise to a flurry of toasty shearling coats in the streets (see: Mirte Maas and Caroline de Maigret) that echoed the action on the runways (Louis Vuitton, Kenzo, Bouchra Jarrar). Designers were feeling sheepish for pre-fall, too. Technicolor furs turned up at Fendi and Cédric Charlier, while Acne Studios and Céline went supersize. All in all, this is the most jazzed we’ve been about shearling since Kate Hudson stole our hearts as Penny Lane in Almost Famous.

CLICK FOR A SLIDESHOW of surefire shearlings.

—Brittany Adams

BLK LTHR, Now Luxer

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“I’ve always been inspired by strong women with integrity,” says Johan Lindeberg. “And I like to surround myself with a lot of them.” Lindeberg’s circle of tough chicks inspired his most recent project: a limited-edition, super-luxe version of the BLK DNM leather jackets
that are already a house favorite. “Whenever I’d meet or collaborate with someone, like Anja Rubik or Caroline de Maigret, I’d envision a different jacket,” he explains.

Focusing on texture and intricate embellishments, like croc-stamped lapels and fur accents, the eight-piece collection features buttery green, brown, black, and purple Italian leather, as well as printed shearling. This kind of luxury doesn’t come cheap: Available from Friday at Colette, as well as the BLK DNM stores in New York and Stockholm, the jackets will range from $3,495 to $3,995, a little steeper than the brand’s usual democratic prices. “When something’s really special, it’s going to cost more,” the designer shrugs, noting that each jacket is made in New York’s Garment District.

It should be noted that Lindeberg hasn’t forgotten about the guys in his life. In addition to creating custom suits for artist Aaron Young, as well as a made-to-order shearling for The Strokes’ Albert Hammond, Jr., the designer has a similar menswear project in the works. But for the moment, this leather’s all for the ladies.

Photo: Courtesy of BLK DNM