Style.com
Subscribe to Style Magazine
5 posts tagged "Cass Bird"

Warby Parker’s Warriors

-------

Nobody does NYC cult better than Chrissie Miller and her longtime collaborator, photographer Cass Bird. So when the gents at Warby Parker (who opened their Soho flagship in April) needed a film to help launch Ocean Avenue—the label’s latest collection, which was inspired by offbeat seventies gang thriller The Warriors—they knew just who to call. Set on Coney Island, the short depicts an old-school dance-off, during which the retro-styled cast members (think lots of denim, some leather biker jackets, and a few pairs of seriously short shorts), somewhat miraculously manage to keep their specs in place. “I liked the idea of two gangs dancing rather than fighting,” said Miller, who’s currently serving as Warby Parker’s creative consultant (she was also the creative director of the film).

Comprising eight optical frames and fourteen sunglasses, the Ocean Avenue range (available from tomorrow) presents a series of new hues, like Sea Glass Blue, Ginger Lemonade, Cream Soda, Newsprint Grey, and Orange Fizz. Take a first look at WP’s wares, as well as the debut of Miller and Bird’s film, above.

Designer Diary: Kristy Caylor’s Postcard from India

-------

“India is a huge part of our brand,” said Maiyet‘s Kristy Caylor. In an effort to foster self-sufficiency and entrepreneurship in emerging economies, Maiyet, the conscious luxury brand cofounded by Caylor and Paul van Zyl in 2011, partners with artisans across the globe. For instance, the label’s handwoven silk and block-printed fabrics are made in Varanasi and Jaipur, respectively. And a few months ago, Caylor took photographer Cass Bird and model Daria Werbowy to both cities to shoot Maiyet’s Spring ’13 campaign, as well as a short film, which debuts exclusively above. “We wanted to incorporate the flavor of Maiyet from a product perspective, and also show the locations and cultures that mean a lot to us,” said Caylor of the Bird-lensed short. Indeed, it was a jam-packed trip, between shooting everywhere from the streets to the Ganges to Rambagh Palace, and visiting local artisans. But the team had some playtime, too—and they used it to watch sunsets over the river, take elephant rides, and make the acquaintance of a mischievous-looking monkey at Jaipur’s Amber Fort. Caylor, who visits India a few times a year, is set to head back this June, when she’ll continue to develop a new facility that will provide better working conditions for artisans. (As it happens, June will also mark the launch of Maiyet’s first store, on Crosby Street). Caylor chronicles her most recent Indian adventure for Style.com, below.

Sunrise on the Ganges in Varanasi.

Shooting Daria on the ghats in Varanasi. Continue Reading “Designer Diary: Kristy Caylor’s Postcard from India” »

Two’s Company

-------

“I didn’t think I’d ever have a store,” Sophomore’s Chrissie Miller says. “I thought, crazy people shop and I didn’t want to be involved in that. But I did it in L.A. and I loved it—that lifestyle, being there and talking to people about the clothes. As soon as I got back, it’s all I was thinking about.” So when a small shop space opened on Ludlow Street, Miller (above right) and friend and fellow designer Lindsey Thornburg (above left) pounced. Just one month after signing on the space, their new collaborative store, 143 (named after the building number, though Miller notes it’s also pager code for “I love you”), the first permanent retail space for either designer, is set to open this Friday.


143 will be divided between the Sophomore collection, which Miller designs with Madeleine von Froomer, and Thornburg’s cape-heavy namesake collection. (Both designers have also moved their studios to the building as well.) But it will also feature new and vintage pieces from a network of friends and the likeminded, including clothes, books, art, and jewelry. “The neighborhood is super vintage-heavy; I think people go [here] looking for vintage,” Miller says. “So I found the best vintage dealers I could, rather than go to New Jersey and try to buy a bunch of stuff myself.” She’s been following the Texas-based dealers Sisters of the Black Moon on eBay for years, for example, and L.A.’s Filthmart, at whose now-shuttered New York store she worked years ago, is supplying vintage menswear.

Shen Beauty will curate an assortment of beauty products, and Miller’s boyfriend, actor and artist Leo Fitzpatrick, will organize art and art books from the likes of Nate Lowman, Bruce Weber, Richard Kern, and Cass Bird. “Leo is obsessed with art books, and we don’t like keeping them in the house after we’re done with them,” Miller says. Retail, the broom of the system! By the same token, shoppers can expect to find Sophomore and Thornburg samples and one-offs on the racks.

143 opens Friday, November 18, at 143 Ludlow St., NYC.

Photo: Aaron Stern

Truth Or Dare, The Sophomore Way

-------



No one knows who invented the game Truth or Dare. But Sophomore designer Chrissie Miller has a pretty good theory as to why it’s proven so popular. “Based on my own experience, it’s just the obvious thing for boys and girls to do when they get together for the first time,” she says. “You’re kids, you’re looking around the room at each other, and you realize, we have absolutely nothing to talk about.” Miller has had Truth or Dare on the brain lately; together with frequent collaborator Cass Bird, she’s created a short documentary featuring the likes of Chloë Sevigny, Lesley Arfin, Jen Brill, Scott Campbell, and PJ Ransone playing the game.

Of course, in addition to all of the pre-teen boys and girls worldwide, Truth or Dare has one very famous practitioner: Madonna, who named her 1991 doc after the game. It’s that flick, in fact, that inspired Miller to lens her own. “I watched it not that long ago, and I just loved it, and I thought, we’ve got to do that,” Miller explains. “It’s not a typical ‘fashion’ film—it’s for Sophomore, yeah, but the clothing isn’t my main concern. I prefer to focus on making something interesting, that people will want to watch. So I rounded up some friends, we got a room at the Bowery Hotel, and came up with a list of questions.” Those questions led to hours of footage, all of which was boiled down to the six-minute film. All that editing means there was plenty left on the cutting room floor—including a few tantalizing bits. “There was one point where Chloë dared Lesley Arfin to kiss her,” Miller recalled. “It was really adorable—I mean, they’ve been friends forever, and they were both willing to go there with the game.” The film debuts tomorrow on www.kanonvodka.com, and tonight, Miller is hosting a screening in Los Angeles at Paul and Andre, the unmarked bar recently opened by Paul Sevigny and André Saraiva.

Photos: Cass Bird

Blasblog: The Camera Phone, Now A Legit Artistic Medium

-------

With camera phone technology getting increasingly sophisticated (did you know some of those suckers can do high-def video now?), this was bound to happen: an art show composed entirely of snaps taken on cells. Such was the gist of a party at the Stephan Weiss Studio on Wednesday night to celebrate Exilim’s new phone, where giant slideshows of the work several New York art types—Cass Bird, Justin Giunta, Richard Kern, Danielle Levitt, Chrissie Miller (see her self-portrait above), and Christian Weber—took on these new phones were projected on the walls. For the artists themselves, it turned out to be a fun experience. Bird, a professional photographer, found herself dabbling in food styling, like when she propped an order of French fries into a sunset, and shooting pics of skateboarders on the street. “I guess you don’t realize how many photographable things surround you,” she said in the VIP section of the party. The technological progress of camera phones was a hot topic of conversation, especially since the crowd spanned chic teenagers, like Taylor Momsen and Zoë Kravitz, to a more mature audience, like Mick Rock and Ann Dexter-Jones. “I can remember when there weren’t even digital cameras,” smiled Dexter-Jones. “Actually, I can remember the time before cell phones.” One good thing—or bad, depending on who you’re asking—about this sort of picture is how intimate they can be. In a few of snaps that Sophomore designer Chrissie Miller took of Lindsay Lohan, Mandy Moore, and the Virgins’ Donald Cumming for her portfolio, they look just like regular folk. “Everyone keeps asking me who the vivacious redhead is in these pictures,” Miller joked. “And I say, ‘Only the most photographed woman in the world: Lindsay Lohan.’ “